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#1007523 - Thu Aug 29 2013 07:14 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
TabbyTom Offline
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Registered: Wed Oct 17 2001
Posts: 8174
Loc: Hastings Sussex England UK    
Is it only in these islands that the -er/-re becomes -ah? How do they say it at Hahvahd?
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#1007616 - Thu Aug 29 2013 04:12 PM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
jabb5076 Offline
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Registered: Tue Apr 24 2012
Posts: 179
Loc: Georgia USA
The whole theatre/ theater issue is something that is continually misunderstood. In the U.S., "theater" has become the most common form, while "theatre" holds sway throughout most of the world. However, theatre purists in the U.S. (of which I am obviously one) will tell you that "theater" is used for a film venue, while "theatre" is both an art form and a place where plays are performed. Many people put the blame for the change in this country on Noah Webster; in his attempt to create American spelling distinct from its British roots, he sometimes created problems that we still argue about today.

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#1007644 - Thu Aug 29 2013 05:29 PM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: vendome]
kaddarsgirl Offline
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Registered: Wed Jun 27 2012
Posts: 1681
Loc: Ohio USA
Originally Posted By: vendome
Jeet? (Did you eat?)
No--jew? (No, did you?)


I have only every heard these in the deep south (GA/AL/MS/AR) and Texas. I have not heard anyone from New England or the lakes states speak like that (or anyone out in California - can't speak for the rest of the West, never been). Certainly as an Ohioan (even with my twang) I pronounce all the words separately.
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#1007659 - Thu Aug 29 2013 07:02 PM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: vendome]
guitargoddess Online   FT-cool


Registered: Mon Jul 09 2007
Posts: 34075
Loc: Ottawa Ontario Canada         
Originally Posted By: vendome
One thing that has always fascinated me is the Canadian and western USA pronunciation of 'o'. In these areas, 'o' is pronounced like the 'oo' in zoo' so the word 'out' sounds like 'oot'.


I assure you, I and 99% of the people I know, pronounce 'out' like 'out'. The only people I've ever heard say 'oot' are maybe Newfies with thick accents.
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#1007670 - Thu Aug 29 2013 09:25 PM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: kaddarsgirl]
MiraJane Offline
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Registered: Tue Apr 30 2013
Posts: 511
Loc: New York USA
Originally Posted By: kaddarsgirl
Originally Posted By: vendome
Jeet? (Did you eat?)
No--jew? (No, did you?)


I have only every heard these in the deep south (GA/AL/MS/AR) and Texas. I have not heard anyone from New England or the lakes states speak like that (or anyone out in California - can't speak for the rest of the West, never been). Certainly as an Ohioan (even with my twang) I pronounce all the words separately.



I hear this in the lower New York State area. Drives me crazy. However, if people do attempt to separate the words it's something like "Didja eat?" or "Did jeet?" followed by ""No, did ju?"

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#1008571 - Tue Sep 03 2013 11:58 PM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
Jar Offline
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Registered: Wed Apr 11 2001
Posts: 4216
Loc: Texas USA
Originally from Chicago, and many, many places between there and Texas, I have always pronounced the thing you pull out of a dresser, a drawer. Two syllables. Every time I visit relatives in upstate New York they say draw. I correct them every time and we laugh about it. But then I'm always changing the way they put their toilet paper on the roll, too. wink
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#1008602 - Wed Sep 04 2013 01:49 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
sue943 Offline

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Registered: Sun Dec 19 1999
Posts: 35625
Loc: Jersey Channel Islands        
Jar, draw us what we say too.
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#1008615 - Wed Sep 04 2013 03:01 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
mehaul Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Wed Feb 03 2010
Posts: 5184
Loc: Florida USA
How about the "-ove' words?
above
cove
dove
drove
hove
love
move
prove
rove
stove
wove

Any others with such a variety of pronouncements?
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#1008646 - Wed Sep 04 2013 04:39 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
Santana2002 Offline
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Registered: Mon Apr 14 2003
Posts: 8324
Loc: France
all the -ough words spring to mind... Wiki article

Though :(th-oh)
through : (thr-oo)
Rough : (r-uff)
Cough : (c-off)
Thought : (th-aw-t)
bough : (b-ow)
lough : (l-ock)
Hiccough : (hic-up)


Edited by Santana2002 (Wed Sep 04 2013 04:51 AM)
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#1008647 - Wed Sep 04 2013 05:04 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
mehaul Offline
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Registered: Wed Feb 03 2010
Posts: 5184
Loc: Florida USA
I wonder if -ove and -ough were related back in the days when spelling was the new science on the block? Trough and trove might have been argued over at the bar.

edit to add tough (tuff) to the -ough list and fought to the -ought list and it could have been in my bar scene descript rather than argough (arghue?)

edit2 to add clove and shove to the -ove list


Edited by mehaul (Wed Sep 04 2013 09:53 AM)
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#1008712 - Wed Sep 04 2013 08:04 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: mehaul]
flopsymopsy Offline
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Registered: Sat May 17 2008
Posts: 2652
Loc: Northampton England UK      
Originally Posted By: mehaul
I wonder if -ove and -ough were related back in the days when spelling was the new science on the block? Trough and trove might have been argued over at the bar.


Trough derives from the same root as the word tree.

Trove is from the Old French trover meaning to find.

So unless you were trying to find a tree there's no connection.
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#1008724 - Wed Sep 04 2013 10:03 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
sue943 Offline

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Registered: Sun Dec 19 1999
Posts: 35625
Loc: Jersey Channel Islands        
With the 'ove' words I would personally put them into three groups, each group being slightly different to the others in the way they are pronounced.

above
dove
love
shove

move
prove

cove
drove
hove
rove
stove
wove
clove


Edited by sue943 (Wed Sep 04 2013 10:45 AM)
Edit Reason: Edited to add the shove and clove
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#1008726 - Wed Sep 04 2013 10:21 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
Santana2002 Offline
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Registered: Mon Apr 14 2003
Posts: 8324
Loc: France
I'd agree with that, Sue.
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#1008727 - Wed Sep 04 2013 10:23 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
Santana2002 Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Mon Apr 14 2003
Posts: 8324
Loc: France
Oh, and I'm with Jar for the pronunciation of drawer, that -er at the end is not an optional extra, I pronounce it.
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#1008733 - Wed Sep 04 2013 10:52 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
TabbyTom Offline
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Registered: Wed Oct 17 2001
Posts: 8174
Loc: Hastings Sussex England UK    
I think that drawer has become draw'r (in one syllable) in the same way that prayer has become pray'r. For those of us in the south of England and elsewhere, who don't pronounce our r's clearly, draw'r sounds just like draw.
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#1008791 - Wed Sep 04 2013 02:33 PM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
jabb5076 Offline
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Registered: Tue Apr 24 2012
Posts: 179
Loc: Georgia USA
I guess we all just have to accept that English is a confusing conglomeration of different languages and country and regional alterations--no wonder it's considered difficult to learn!

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#1008820 - Wed Sep 04 2013 03:17 PM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
rossian Offline
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Registered: Sat Jun 10 2006
Posts: 1499
Loc: Merseyside UK 
Because drawer is pronounced without the 'er' at the end, many people get confused with the spelling. I've seen it written as 'draw' so many times I've lost count.
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#1008846 - Wed Sep 04 2013 04:44 PM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
guitargoddess Online   FT-cool


Registered: Mon Jul 09 2007
Posts: 34075
Loc: Ottawa Ontario Canada         
For me I don't *fully* pronounce the -er but 'drawer' certainly doesn't exactly like 'draw'. More like 'door' with an extra r
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#1008896 - Wed Sep 04 2013 10:35 PM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
Santana2002 Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Mon Apr 14 2003
Posts: 8324
Loc: France
Well yes, I agree the -er is not fully sounded out. I end up with something which rhymes with "roar".
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#1008908 - Thu Sep 05 2013 02:33 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
sue943 Offline

Administrator

Registered: Sun Dec 19 1999
Posts: 35625
Loc: Jersey Channel Islands        
You could be right Tom, Toni is Irish so has a delightful, but different accent to us from the South of England.
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#1008925 - Thu Sep 05 2013 06:53 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
Santana2002 Offline
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Registered: Mon Apr 14 2003
Posts: 8324
Loc: France
hihi thanks for the compliment on my accent, Sue (not that any of the credit belongs to me). It's true, I probably pronounce certain words differently from a person in the UK.
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#1008945 - Thu Sep 05 2013 08:46 AM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
MadMartha Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Apr 25 2008
Posts: 13485
Loc: Georgia USA
I enjoy hearing people from different regions speak "their language." The thing I try always to remember is that my dialect sounds just as strange/funny to others as theirs does to me! wink
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#1012535 - Thu Sep 26 2013 02:06 PM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
Jakeroo Offline
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Registered: Sat Aug 30 2008
Posts: 1925
Loc: Alberta Canada
I, like gg, have never heard anyone say out as "oot", unless it was my Gaelic grandfather. And yes, some folks in the Maritimes, since there is a lot of the same influence there. I DO find though, that some words with "ou" in the middle, CAN be pronounced differently than our American cousins. For instance "route" (which we pronounce "root" in Alberta, but Americans are more likely to say it as "rout"). And don't get me started on roof/ruff or ruffs/rooves lol.

For your dubious amusement, here's a semi-related beer commercial..
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=up0i0G_y05A&list=TLAaFf7UPbrgbzxOvwoVCTDAG8mpkipQLy

Or perhaps you'd prefer the William Shatner parody version (which I admit, is completely unrelated to pronunciation)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qneD11pj4Y0&list=TLAaFf7UPbrgbzxOvwoVCTDAG8mpkipQLy

Disclaimer: I'm not advocating either beer or priceline - it's just funny, ok? lol. Moderators can feel free to delete the post.
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#1012546 - Thu Sep 26 2013 02:47 PM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: sue943]
C30 Offline
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Registered: Sat Nov 13 2010
Posts: 100
Loc: Lancashire England UK         
My mother, after watching me make a mess of doing something - "Dew yew dew as yew should dew then you dew much better than yew do dew" - East Anglian as it is spook! Lol

Lets face it, with the variations of English (English-English, American-English, Australian-English, etc), it is hard enough for someone who's native tongue is English. Throw local regional dialects into the mix and it gets distorted further. People trying to learn English must despair! Lol

If we take my East Anglia - those who know, can tell that the rural Essex dialect differs from their neighbours in Suffolk, which in turn differs from Norfolk.

For example............the Norfolk dialect tends to be a slow and drawled monotone.
Suffolk is pronounced the same, but the voice goes up and down the scale, and is described as "Norfolk set to music". Essex, has the London influence creeping in, so whilst sounds like Suffolk, tends to drop H's from words.................and so it goes on........!

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#1012548 - Thu Sep 26 2013 03:18 PM Re: A question for our US cousins [Re: Jakeroo]
guitargoddess Online   FT-cool


Registered: Mon Jul 09 2007
Posts: 34075
Loc: Ottawa Ontario Canada         
Originally Posted By: Jakeroo

For your dubious amusement, here's a semi-related beer commercial..
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=up0i0G_y05A&list=TLAaFf7UPbrgbzxOvwoVCTDAG8mpkipQLy


lol I've never seen the curved stick one, I liked it!

The most relevant one is missing though, the rant!
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