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#507133 - Tue Jan 05 2010 07:57 AM Interview with Snowman
BxBarracuda Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Wed Sep 05 2007
Posts: 5117
Loc: Bronx
New�York�USA�...
Quiz Beagle & Bruyere
What do you like about living in London, what part of the UK do you like the most, and have you lived anywhere else for a significant amount of time?

Apart from my university days living in Sheffield, I've lived my entire life in London. Before I had children, I couldn't have envisaged a reason to want to leave. I've always felt that the city was part of me, rather than just a place where I happened to live. What I love about it is the vibrancy and the variety of the city. Whatever you want to do on any given day is usually available to you. I particularly love the open spaces and the river. I live just a few minutes walk from Greenwich park where I could happily sit all day and watch the world go by (the views of the city are spectacular).

It's very easy to be blas about London when you are from here. You take so much of it for granted. One of my favourite things to do is to take newcomers around the city and share in their wonderment of the sights that I normally walk straight past.

As for my favourite part of the UK; there is still a lot of it that I have yet to explore. I have done a lot of travelling worldwide but not anywhere near as much at home. Of the places I have visited, I love going to Scotland, particularly Perthshire, and the Forest of Dean, near to where my parents live. Last New Year I stayed in the Lake District for the first time and found it extraordinarily beautiful, although it was too cold for me (despite my nickname, I've never been a fan of winter weather).

My choice of favourite place, for sentimental reasons, would have to be Warwick - I got married in the Great Hall of the Lord Leycester Hospital, a 14th century retirement home for ex-servicemen. We were the first couple ever to be married in the hall, which was the scene of a banquet for James VI of Scotland as he travelled to London to claim the English throne.


Quiz Beagle & Paigedamon
Being a new-ish Editor, has being one changed your FT experience, and if so, how?
What is your favorite part of being a FunTrivia editor? What's your least favorite aspect?

It has changed my experience considerably. I appreciate the craft of quiz making more than I did previously and I hope that it has improved me as a writer too. I find I take much more care over the quizzes I create. Authoring my first quiz after becoming an editor was quite nerve-wracking as I knew I had to make it completely fault-free!

The experience on FT has been, more or less, uniformly positive. It would be difficult to pinpoint a least favourite aspect of it. I've not suffered too many difficulties with authors and usually find that they will listen to what you offer in terms of constructive criticism. I suppose that telling people that they aren't ready to author quizzes is probably the least pleasant thing that I have to do as an editor.

The good parts are far easier to highlight. I love the creative process and enjoy watching authors develop their quizzes and, over time, develop their skills. It's nice how, as an editor, making a small suggestion to an author about one or two questions can help them turn a good quiz into an excellent one. Then, seeing the compliments pour in for a quiz that I've edited is a delight. I also love seeing the enthusiasm of new authors despite the difficult process of getting a first quiz online. We've all been there.

Finally, getting to work closely with the other editors on the site is a privilege. New editors need as much help as new authors sometimes do and it is always there when required.


Paigedamon & BX
You are a prolific (and darn good) quiz writer. How do you get the inspiration to write your quizzes? Can you also tell us a bit about the highly rated Half Peeled Quince?

Those who have seen my posts in the Author's Lounge may well be aware that I believe in the power of the shower. Many of my best ideas and best questions are formulated there. Unfortunately, a paper and pen are not much use in a shower and a laptop isn't at its best either. It then becomes a race to get to the PC before I forget it all (which often happens).

Inspiration can come from anywhere at all. Often it comes from hearing something on the news or reading something in a book but often it can just come from a chance remark I hear at work or in the pub that will set my mind racing. Sometimes, it's inexplicable. For example, I saw five minutes of Richard Attenborough's "Chaplin" the other day and I immediately thought, I'll do a quiz on William Randolph Hearst. I still haven't worked out the connection in my head. What this probably demonstrates is that my mind is not very disciplined. It tends to go off and do its own thing, which infuriated my teachers but has been great in terms of acquiring general knowledge. Whenever I think of something I don't know about, my instinct is to find out straight away.

The Quince quiz was unlike anything else I have ever done. For a start, I wasn't in control of the title, it was gifted to me by Highfells via Kyle's Commissions. I had no idea at all what to do with it when I first saw it. I even had to double check exactly what a quince was. Thankfully, my wife is a Harry Potter fan and when I told her the title she informed me as to the likely derivation of it. From there, the idea of rhyming titles came quite quickly but little more than that. I have scant knowledge of Harry Potter (it probably shows) so I worried about how to construct the narrative. In the end I treated it as a creative writing exercise and just let the words flow. I found myself laughing at the absurdity of some of things I came up with and just hoped that players would find it amusing too. Fortunately, the response to it has been fantastic so far. I have had compliments from Potter fanatics and haters alike!


Lesley153
When you've been researching for quizzes, what's the most surprising fact you've unearthed and have you ever turned your writing skills to adults' or children's fiction?

Perhaps it's not the most surprising fact, but my favourite thing that I have come across in the course of quiz writing is the story of how potatoes came to be a popular crop in France. I won't spoil the story for those who want to play the quiz but the subterfuge involved amused me no end.

I'm not sure I have the patience for writing fiction but I toyed with the idea of screenwriting when I was younger. I wrote a few sketched out scenes for a dark comedy or two in my early twenties. I re-read one of them a year or so ago and I have to admit, it was nowhere near as bad as I feared, although it would need a lot of work before it would be in a fit state to show to anyone else.

I have been sorely tempted to write screen adaptations of a couple of novels that I have read. Maybe one day I will do it.


Darksplash
Which funtrivia.com quiz author do you admire most, and why?

When I first started I remember being impressed (if not overawed) by the quality of quizzes from a number of authors such as uglybird, jouen58 and stuthehistoryguy. I was fortunate to be invited into the Quiz Makers Guild where I could rub shoulders with such giants of the site and many other very talented writers. Without question, that spurred me on to write better quizzes than I had been before that point.

The QMG is still the place to find many of the very best authors on the site (such as my inquistors in this interview, for example), but there are plenty of others on the site who consistently write quizzes that impress. The challenges in the Author's Lounge have certained inspired some of the site's most creative people to produce quizzes of the highest quality.

All that is a roundabout way of saying that I'm not sure I could name just one. Suffice to say that anyone who consistently writes quizzes that inform, amuse and surprise are the ones who I admire the most.


Darksplash & BX
Which football (soccer) team do you support? Are there any other sports you follow?

I have had the personality forming experience of being a West Ham fan. If nothing else, it has taught me how to deal with great disappointments in life (and also that style is more fun than substance). Other than football, I'm a keen follower of Rugby Union, having played the game from the age of seven until injury ended my playing days in my early twenties.

I'll watch most sports if I'm ever given the time to but my other major sport to follow is Athletics (or Track and Field as some here will call it). The family talent for running fast passed me by, but the passion of my grandfather for the sport rubbed off on me. He was a sprinter of some success pre-WWII who became a coach once his running days were over. He trained British sprinter, Macdonald Bailey, and was invited to coach the Indian team in the 1954 Asian Games but turned it down (he never travelled outside of England and didn't want to). As a young boy he subjected me to all sorts of strange training routines including running round the local farm wearing weighted metal boots!

Boxing used to be a great passion when I was younger but the sport is too divided to hold the interest for long now. Its too easy for the best boxers to avoid fighting each other.


Bruyere
What do you find most rewarding about parenthood? Frustrating?

Without a doubt, the greatest reward is in the moments when you see your children's face light up and break into a beaming smile, just because you have walked through the door. Nothing prior to parenthood prepares you for the joys of unconditional love.

The frustrations lie entirely in the broken nights of sleep. One of the great ironies in my life is that I lived for more than a decade with an undiagnosed sleep disorder which meant that I never really got any deep REM sleep. 18 months ago I had an operation that cured my problem and then I had kids. I still don't know what a good night's sleep is!


Lesley153
Besides contributing to FT, what do you do for fun?

Without wanting to sound too one-dimensional, one of my main hobbies is doing pub quizzes. I have a local one I go to most weeks.

In my younger days, I played sport (rugby union and football with the odd game of cricket here and there) but sadly, as I mentioned before, injuries meant those ended sooner than I would have wished.

Like most on here I suspect, I'm an avid reader. Biographies and social histories are my favourite books although I do throw myself into the occasional novel - Paul Auster, Tim Parks and Don DeLillo are favourite authors.

In the past couple of years, I've rediscovered my love of cooking. I consider myself a bit of a whizz in the kitchen give me good ingredients and plenty of time and space and I can knock together something half-decent. I can do a throw something together type of cooking but I love taking on fine dining dishes. I have a cookbook by 2 Michelin star chef, John Campbell, and have mastered a few of his creations but with my own style (I am far from technically perfect as a cook).

But my true love is the movies. Whenever I get the chance to take my wife out, the cinema is our first choice. We have slightly different taste in films (I'm more of an arthouse fan) but usually we are compatible enough not to bore each other with our choices. However, sometimes the choices can be inappropriate - my wife chose the abortion drama, "Vera Drake", for our first date movie, for example. A good film but hardly the topic for a burgeoning relationship.


Quiz Beagle
If money was no object, what would be your dream holiday and why?

That's a very tough question. Despite complaining about the weather previously, I'd be tempted to say a trip to the south pole but I think my first choice would be a journey across Africa. I've been bitten by the African bug, to the extent that I have considered relocating there in the past. A trip from Cape to Cairo would be months of extraordinary experiences, fascinating people and astonishing sights. As an inveterate traveller, who has had his wings clipped in the last few years, I'm getting itchy feet just thinking about it.

If money is no object then I'd spend the odd night in five star luxury (there is a spectacular three-sided lodge on the edge of the Zambezi river in Zambia that I would love to go back to again) but I'd spend more money on experiences such as hot air ballooning across the Namibian sand dunes rather than on luxurious travel or accommodation. I'm happiest slumming it on crowded buses or trains - you get to meet so many people that way.


Bruyere
Rumor has it that you went to school with the flamboyant Sacha Baron Cohen aka Borat? What is he like in person?

The rumour is true. Even though Sacha and I were born only five days apart, we were in separate years at school and I never got to know him that well. I do remember him as being a nice guy and my brother, who was in the same year as him, says he was always very witty. I don't think anyone could have predicted the career he has had though.

The person I knew better was Dan Mazer, who is Sacha's producer and one of his scriptwriters. I've even performed on stage with Dan - a lousy version of Pete and Dud's "Mr. Spigott" sketch (I was Mr. Spigott). It was part of a revue that we performed at the end of an exchange trip we went on to a high school in New Jersey.

Our school mined a rich seam of comedy talent. As well as Dan and Sacha, we had Matt Lucas in the year below me (I knew him but we didn't get on particularly well), a guy from the stand-up circuit as well, David Baddiel. And then there's the politicians who were comedians in their own particular way...


BX
What are your television watching habits and if you could bring back one show that is no longer on the air which would it be?

I've become a regular viewer since becoming a parent. I don't seem to have the energy for much else. My PVR is vital for my sanity. I tend to watch "on demand" and "catch up" rather than live TV. I watch plenty of series now that I would have missed a few years ago such as "Mad Men", "Damages" and "Spooks" and I can finally catch up on the series that I missed such as "The West Wing" and "The Wire".

There are many programmes that are no longer made that I love such as "Minder" or "Ripping Yarns" (and "Dangermouse" from childhood), but if I had to bring back just one it would be have to be "Blackadder". I'm not sure which period of history I'd throw them into though - perhaps the 17th century and the English Civil Wars.


Lesley153
Your blog is shiny and new, and your profile information is minimal. Are you happier guarding your privacy?

What? You want more? I'm not one to readily volunteer information about myself, but I'm quite open if someone asks me something directly. I'm quite shy in some ways, although many of my friends would scoff at such a suggestion. I am far happier writing about someone else's life rather than my own though.

In certain aspects of my life I've had to be fairly circumspect. My wife once stood in a general election to become an MP and the role of an MP's "wife" requires that you are never noticeable. Just ask Jacqui Smith's husband about that!

In my early days on the social internet, I guarded my privacy jealously. I quite liked the anonymity and the sense of mystery that you could throw around your internet persona. Despite offers, I never met anyone I had befriended on the internet for years until I got to know a few fellow West Ham fans online and decided to go to a few games with them. That experience changed my perspective radically and now I'm far more open to consolidating online friendships. I've never met a fellow FT member though. Maybe if there was a London meet-up sometime I may pitch up there.

I didn't even know I had a blog by the way! Maybe I'll start on mine now.


Darksplash
Your house is on fire. You have time to save just one music CD. Which do you save, and why?

Would it be cheating to save 70 of them? When I got married a few years back we had a jukebox so that our guests could choose the music for the evening (we also had a black Elvis impersonator called, imaginatively, "Black Elvis" but that's another story). I painstakingly compiled all 70 CDs to go into the jukebox from my personal collection and from requests and suggestions from the guests. All 70 CDs sit in one zip-up case and are an evocative reminder of one of the most special days in my life. Saving that would mean more than anything else.

However, if I was allowed only one of those CDs, then it would have to be the music from the ceremony. It consisted of Vivaldi's "Concerto in G Major for Two Mandolins", Handel's "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba" (of course), Mozart's "Le nozze di Figaro, Act I - Duet: Se a caso madama la notte" sung by Bryn Terfel and Cecilia Bartoli, and Gluck's "Di Questa Cetra In Seno" also sung by Bartoli. One of my ushers was manning the jukebox during the ceremony and was constantly in fear of accidentally sending my wife down the aisle to the strains of Frankie Goes to Hollywood's "Relax".


Darksplash
You are one of four people on a light aircraft about to crash into the Gobi Desert. You are in charge of the parachutes, but there are only two. You keep one for yourself. Who do you give the other to.
A : Robin Van Persie B: Jermain Defoe C : Joe Cole

Well, Robin Van Persie seems quite good at diving without a parachute so I wouldn't waste it on him. So that leaves a toss-up between Cole and Defoe. I have to say, that's not a contest for me; it would be Cole without question. Even though he is a Chelsea player now, I can still derive enjoyment from watching him play in a way I just can't with Defoe. My Dad is a Chelsea fan, which is why I am slightly more tolerant of them than the average West Ham fan.


Darksplash
You have been appointed entertainments secretary of the Funtrivia.com Social Club. You have been given pictures of three members (and three only).You must choose one for the dartboard. Who do you pick -
A: Highfells B: Nightmare C: Kylesalive

Hmmm.... a choice between two of my seniors on the editing team or the person who provided the inspiration for my highest rated quiz? Can I take the fifth?


Darksplash
You are appearing on "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire" and are stumped for the final question. To win a million, you must phone a friend. Who're you gonna call:
A: Melisch; B: Triviaballer; C: Emma-Jane

I would be severely tempted to choose Triviaballer. What that man doesn't know is barely worth knowing. I think the million would be virtually guaranteed. Having said that, my phone a friend would have to know something about soap stars as I am completely devoid of knowledge or interest in that area. Some question always comes up on them whenever I watch "Millionaire". So, a Brit would probably be required, which means Emma-Jane would get my vote.


Quiz Beagle
Now that you have achieved so many sterling feats on Fun Trivia, including being an Editor, the Lucky Duck (sob!) and Highest Rated Author - what are the ambitions that you have left on FT?


Well, I worked darned hard for that Lucky Duck badge Most of my ambitions on the site have been centred around authoring rather than playing but the Obscure Knowledge badge is the one player's badge that I crave. I've come close once or twice but no cigar (yet).

Beyond that, I would love to get a quiz online in all 20 categories. Just two to go, including Brain Teasers, which is my blind spot. Once that is achieved then getting sunnies in every category would be next on the list.

My main ambition though, is to continue enjoying FT and hopefully contributing meaningfully to the site.


Pagiedamon
What does your wife think about FunTrivia and your role in it?

I offered her the chance to answer this herself but she refused. My wife is not much of a quizzer and shows little interest in taking the quizzes on FT but she will often make suggestions for the occasional question when I am writing. She's an historian so I often ask her opinion on questions I am considering for History or People quizzes and I use her as a guinea pig sometimes to see if I've made a quiz too difficult or not.

As for my role here, she accepts it as she knows what it means to me. The offer to become an editor came at a none-too-convenient time, as our daughter was just six weeks old at the time but, after discussing it, I felt I had to take it on as the offer was unlikely to come again.

There are times when she gets a little fed up with me being on the site but on the whole she indulges my addiction (and I indulge her eBay habits in return).


BX
You mention being blase about living in London. Living in New York City I can understand where you are coming from, one thing that visitors to New York rave about that I have never gotten into are Broadway shows. What are some of the aspects of life in London that you feel you haven't fully appreciated yet and which aspects are you most interested in.

There is plenty in London's cultural life that I have yet to fully embrace. For example, I've never been, to my shame, to the National Gallery or to Sadler's Wells Ballet (despite a long outstanding promisary note to my wife).

Like you, the Broadway-style shows (or West End shows as we would call them) do little for me. On the rare occasions I get to go to the theatre, I'm more inclined to choose something on the cutting edge than a Lloyd Webber musical.

Another aspect that I haven't explored fully enough is the capital's restaurants, although I'm making an effort to remedy that. We are blessed with some stunning restaurants here and whilst I have visited some of the country's best outside of London, I have not been to too many here. It's not something I can do too often though - it's a very expensive business.

We're planning to leave London in the next two to three years. When we've left I hope I'll be able to say I've made the most of my time here (and my answer to this question may well be very different).


BX
You mention pub quizzes as a hobby. The local one I go to has a mixture of general fill in the blank, multiple choice, visual, and a 40% emphasis on music. The music is that name that tune sort, where you hear a short section of a song, usually instrumental only, and have to name the artist and song. How are the ones you are participated in set up?

Ours is quite a traditional set-up. Five themed rounds of ten questions, each, in FT terms, a fill in the blank question. Sometimes, one of the rounds is a picture round (I always include one whenever I set the quiz) such as asking to name famous buildings from around the world or recognising a country from its outline. Occasionally there is a round that involves the playing of music where you either have to guess the intro, guess the next line or spot the word that has been bleeped out.

There is one extra round which I would love to see adapted as a game on here . It's called the wipeout round. You are asked five questions of varying degrees of difficulty. Each question you get right is worth two points but the twist is, if you get a single question wrong then you score zero for the entire round. You are not obliged to write down an answer for each question. Only the questions you answer are marked so if you choose not to answer four of them you will not be penalised. It makes for great discussions as you try to work out whether it is worth gambling on an answer that you are not 100% sure about.


BX
We are coming to the end of the holiday season. Does your household celebrate any of December Holidays and are there family traditions that accompany the holidays for you?

I quite shamelessly celebrate Christmas even though I am not Christian. My wife, however, does have some belief so I use that as my excuse. We're still establishing our traditions as a family but generally they seem to involve my son opening all the presents regardless of whether they are his or not. I used to go to midnight mass each year (not always entirely sober) as I love singing Christmas carols but I've not been for a few years now.

One tradition that I have carried over from my parents' way of doing things is to go for a long walk in the morning and to come back and open a bottle of champagne at 11.00am. Long may that continue.


BX
What would you say is the most daring thing you have ever done, both physically and socially?

Physically it would probably have to be leaping off the edge of a cliff attached only to a bungee rope - something that is called a Gorge Jump. If you ask really nicely I might even let you in on the URL of the video on YouTube.

Socially is more difficult to pin down. I don't feel that I've done anything truly outrageous or have ever starkly put myself on the line but I have a dreadful fear of public speaking so anything that involves that feels incredibly daring to me.


BX
Can you tell us about the QMG's 12 Days of Christmas quizzes which have become a badgelet, but I think were done previously.

The 12 Days challenge was inspired by The Guild's much missed team mate, socalmiguel, and it stands as a tribute to all the qualities that he had. He thought of the idea, cajoled 12 of us into volunteering to create the quizzes, offered ideas to us all and acted as the sounding board for all of our ideas. The Guild had been doing group quizzes long before I was asked to join them but putting together something of that kind was new. It took a lot of organisation and a lot of patience from Miguel and Bruyere, who acted as the editor for all of the quizzes. Each quiz was released on its relevant day starting on 26th December 2008 and ending on 5th January 2009.

I'm very proud of all of those quizzes. What I particularly love is that each of them takes a different approach from the next and the 12 combined provide a really interesting quiz experience. We were all delighted when Terry created the badgelet this Christmas past as it recognises the effort that went in to creating them. I like to think of it as the socalmiguel memorial badgelet.


Many Thanks to Snowman and all who took part in this interview.

(Edited to add information which should have been included in original post)


Edited by Pagiedamon (Mon Dec 31 2012 12:49 PM)

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#507134 - Tue Jan 05 2010 10:08 AM Re: Snowman Interview
guitargoddess Offline
Moderator

Registered: Mon Jul 09 2007
Posts: 38597
Loc: Ottawa OntarioCanada
Snowman, you give a great interview!


Mrs. Snowman is an historian, eh? Ask her what I should do with my History degree, lol
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Editor: Television and Animals

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#507135 - Tue Jan 05 2010 01:55 PM Re: Snowman Interview
Snowman Offline
Prolific

Registered: Wed Oct 31 2007
Posts: 1613
Loc: London EnglandUK
Well, its not often I get the chance to speak for her so I'm going to take the opportunity quickly. I'm pretty certain she would say, "Whatever you want to!"

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#507136 - Tue Jan 05 2010 07:30 PM Re: Snowman Interview
Exit10 Offline


Registered: Fri Sep 28 2001
Posts: 4253
Loc: Brisbane QueenslandAustralia
<<<Darksplash
You have been appointed entertainments secretary of the Funtrivia.com Social Club. You have been given pictures of three members (and three only).You must choose one for the dartboard. Who do you pick -

Hmmm.... a choice between two of my seniors on the editing team or the person who provided the inspiration for my highest rated quiz? Can I take the fifth?>>>


Think very carefully about this one.


Exit10
People Editor

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#507137 - Wed Jan 06 2010 08:52 AM Re: Snowman Interview
BxBarracuda Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Wed Sep 05 2007
Posts: 5117
Loc: Bronx
New�York�USA�...
Exit, those names originally missing from that question, as well as the ones from the question before have been added. Not that it changes the trickiness of the answer, lol.

They had gotten lost in the shuffle.

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#507138 - Wed Jan 06 2010 10:52 AM Re: Snowman Interview
satguru Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Thu Feb 17 2000
Posts: 7517
Loc: Kingsbury LondonUK
I know the school you went to now, I didn't go myself but knew some who did although half a generation before you. But the names you mentioned are local to me and although familiar in person to a number of people I know the only one I can claim to have seen was David Baddiel once at a party, although he spent most of it sitting in a corridor with his friends and didn't speak to anyone else.
With all the distance between us here it's nice to see some more familiar names and places mentioned!
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#507139 - Wed Jan 06 2010 12:01 PM Re: Snowman Interview
chris42 Offline
Forum Adept

Registered: Fri Nov 28 2003
Posts: 174
Loc: The Netherlands
Good interview Snowy and I know your area well in London. Used to live on Royal Hill (about a 5 minute walk from the park) and lived above a pub called the Fox and Hounds (now called 'Time' I think) which is directly right next door to the Richard I pub, which apparently is the only place in the whole of the UK that have two pubs adjacent each other. This was back in the 70's and early 80's, but still visit Greenwich three or four times a year to check up on old friends.
Always enjoy your quizzes so keep them coming sir!
_________________________
The meek shall inherit the Earth. But only when the strong let them.

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#507140 - Wed Jan 06 2010 12:28 PM Re: Snowman Interview
lesley153 Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Fri Sep 07 2007
Posts: 734
Loc: Bedford England�UK���...
Thank you for a fascinating interview, Snowman, and thank you BxB for putting it all together.

< < <I like to think of it as the socalmiguel memorial badgelet.> > >
I did a few of the early ones but haven't been able to do any more that Miguel wrote or was associated with (isn't that silly?). But this remark has prompted me to go back and have another go. Soon.
_________________________
I appreciate people who are civil, whether they mean it or not. I think: Be civil. Do not cherish your opinion over my feelings. There's a vanity to candor that isn't really worth it. Be kind. ~ Richard Greenberg

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#507141 - Wed Jan 06 2010 10:13 PM Re: Snowman Interview
Pagiedamon Offline
Moderator

Registered: Sun Jun 15 2008
Posts: 2592
Loc: North Carolina USA
Great interview, Pete! What a fascinating creature you are!
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#507142 - Thu Jan 07 2010 12:51 PM Re: Snowman Interview
Gatsby722 Offline
Pure Diamond

Registered: Fri May 18 2001
Posts: 123698
Loc: Canton
OhioUSA
These interviews just get better and better! I now want to have a cool lunch with many of you folks (especially, lately, kyleisalive, ozfei and now you, snowman!). Interesting stuff!
_________________________
"The best teacher is not the one who knows most but the one who is most capable of reducing knowledge to that simple compound of the obvious and wonderful." ... H. L. Mencken


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#507143 - Sun Jan 10 2010 07:31 PM Re: Snowman Interview
queproblema Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Mon Sep 25 2006
Posts: 869
Loc: Kenny Lake AlaskaUSA
Many of us don't chime in much on these interviews, but greatly enjoy skimming through them. Thanks to all.

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#507144 - Thu Jan 14 2010 05:04 AM Re: Snowman Interview
Snowman Offline
Prolific

Registered: Wed Oct 31 2007
Posts: 1613
Loc: London EnglandUK
Thanks for all your comments. I've never considered myself fascinating but then, as they say, familiarity breeds contempt.

I've only ever met David Baddiel once and "met" is probably pushing it. We were stood at the bar together at a theatre and he showed little inclination towards engaging me in conversation. His loss!

chris42, that pub is now called The Greenwich Union. It's one of Greenwich's best, although I think living above it might have damaged my health somewhat.

Lesley, I would heartily recommend any of Miguel's quizzes. They all have his hallmark charm stamped throughout them.

Gatsby, be careful what you wish for. If ever I'm in your neighbourhood, which admittedly I haven't been for over a decade now, I will take you up on that offer

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#507145 - Thu Jan 14 2010 02:17 PM Re: Snowman Interview
chris42 Offline
Forum Adept

Registered: Fri Nov 28 2003
Posts: 174
Loc: The Netherlands
Snowman, like me you're a long suffering West Ham supporter. Had a season ticket for all home league games from 1981 to 1989 and very rarely ever missed a game. However, after living in Israel for three years came back to find that the stadium was an all-seater and the prices had gone through the roof. I remember in 1986 it cost only 3 sovs to stand behind the goal!
Will definitely check out the 'Greenwich Union' when I'm back over again in two months time. Got one question for you (consider this as a part of your interview). What would be your all-time West Ham XI from the 1970's to the present (and allowing for five subs on the bench)?
_________________________
The meek shall inherit the Earth. But only when the strong let them.

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#507146 - Mon Jan 25 2010 07:55 PM Re: Snowman Interview
lesley153 Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Fri Sep 07 2007
Posts: 734
Loc: Bedford England�UK���...
Quote:

Lesley, I would heartily recommend any of Miguel's quizzes. They all have his hallmark charm stamped throughout them.




No need, Pete - you would be preaching to the converted.
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#507147 - Wed Jan 27 2010 03:12 AM Re: Snowman Interview
Snowman Offline
Prolific

Registered: Wed Oct 31 2007
Posts: 1613
Loc: London EnglandUK
Quote:

What would be your all-time West Ham XI from the 1970's to the present (and allowing for five subs on the bench)?




I've given this a lot of thought and I've decided to be very strict with myself and restrict my choices to only those players who I saw play in the flesh, as it were. So, no Bobby Moore, no Pop Robson, no Geoff Hurst as my first game was in 1979. My choices are also based on their performances at West Ham, not their subsequent career (so no Frank Lampard Jr.)

My team would be;

Phil Parkes; Ray Stewart, Julian Dicks, Alvin Martin, Slaven Bilic; Alan Devonshire, Billy Bonds, Trevor Brooking, Liam Brady; Paolo Di Canio, Frank McAvennie

Subs: Ludek Miklosko, Rio Ferdinand, Mark Ward, Tony Cottee, David Cross

I think that team would take some beating but it might just be nostalgia clouding my judgement!

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#507148 - Fri Jan 29 2010 08:59 PM Re: Snowman Interview
satguru Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Thu Feb 17 2000
Posts: 7517
Loc: Kingsbury LondonUK
It may be nostalgia but I've actually heard of 90% of them, many from the days when matches were on proper TV and they became huge names as a result, and from them I've only actually seen Tony Cottee play (for Barnet), mainly as I've only seen West Ham play once and relatively recently. It did include Joe Cole though before his England days and could see the talent stand out way above the others. Had you mentioned neighbouring teams of the era it would have been a different story, although if Trevor Brooking played the only time I saw England in 1971 I may have seen him as well. And my first game was a full decade before you at QPR. Stan Bowles and Rodney Marsh. Not many characters like that nowadays, especially as hardly any top teams have more than a couple of British players, if that some days.

You have reminded me of why I am not as enthusiastic about top flight football very much now and prefer to watch the lower divisions who have changed a lot less. Nice to see all those familiar names though, many memories from TV at least.
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