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#688089 - Tue Feb 07 2012 11:31 PM My Favourite book
mayneeyak Offline
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Registered: Wed Oct 27 2010
Posts: 145
Loc: Northern Ontario Canada  
My favourite book is one that's always found in the children's section of the library, but I believe it's a ten minute read you'll never forget.

It's called "The Giving Tree" and is by Shel Silverstein. One read can make you smile way down deep inside and the next reading of it can make you cry like a baby. It's so dynamic in literary ideals that I don't even know where to begin telling you about it, so I won't. I just strongly urge you to take 5-10 minutes and read it and I have a strong feeling you'll never forget it. I guarantee you'll take "something special" with you from reading it.

yak smile

P.S. My second favourite book is "A Child's Garden of Verses" by Robert louis Stevenson.


Edited by sue943 (Thu Feb 09 2012 03:47 AM)
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#688135 - Wed Feb 08 2012 06:09 AM Re: My Favourite book
Santana2002 Offline
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Registered: Mon Apr 14 2003
Posts: 8725
Loc: France
I have both of those, mayneeyak, and thoroughly enjoy both of them.

The giving tree is very poignant, and a true representation of human nature. It's deceptively simply in the telling, the sentences are short and simple, yet the strong emotion conveyed, that hits sooooo close to the mark, is what stands out in my mind! I really admire how Silverstein gets to the crux of the matter in such an unassuming manner.

I bought The Giving Tree for my children, never having read his work as a child myself, and quickly built up a nice collection, all of which a huge hits with my three youngsters. The Missing Piece, The Missing Piece meets the Big O and Lafcadio are three of the ones that were the most popular with my gang.

As for RLS Child's Garden of Verses, I have had so many different editions of this book throughout my life, and have thoroughly enjoyed it at all stages. Even now I often dust off the copy my kids' were given as very small youngsters and flick through it with as much pleasure as ever. A classic!
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#688141 - Wed Feb 08 2012 08:44 AM Re: My Favourite book
agony Offline

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Registered: Sat Mar 29 2003
Posts: 14830
Loc: Western Canada
I've got a lot of the RLS poems by memory - used to recite them to my kids when they were little. "Mommy, say that thing about going up in the air so blue while I'm swinging!"

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#688380 - Wed Feb 08 2012 06:47 PM Re: My Favourite book
mayneeyak Offline
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Registered: Wed Oct 27 2010
Posts: 145
Loc: Northern Ontario Canada  
For agony...From Child's Garden of Verses wink


The Swing ~ By: Robert Louis Stevenson


How do you like to go up in a swing,
Up in the air so blue?
Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing
Ever a child can do!

Up in the air and over the wall,
Till I can see so wide,
River and trees and cattle and all
Over the countryside--

Till I look down on the garden green,
Down on the roof so brown--
Up in the air I go flying again,
Up in the air and down!
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#688383 - Wed Feb 08 2012 06:56 PM Re: My Favourite book
mayneeyak Offline
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Registered: Wed Oct 27 2010
Posts: 145
Loc: Northern Ontario Canada  
RLS was such a sickly child. I relate to him in this way. How many times I read "A Child's Garden of Verses" while laying sick in bed is uncountable. The first several poems were actually dedicated to children who were bed-ridden, which I was far too often for far too long.

Yet I remember how A child's Garden kept me company and I'd often wake up clutching the book as a child would clutch a teddy bear.

Maybe this will 'ring a bell'...

Bed in Summer ~ by: Robert Louis Stevenson

From "A Child's Garden of Verses"

In winter I get up at night
And dress by yellow candle-light.
In summer quite the other way,
I have to go to bed by day.

I have to go to bed and see
The birds still hopping on the tree,
Or hear the grown-up people's feet
Still going past me in the street.

And does it not seem hard to you,
When all the sky is clear and blue,
And I should like so much to play,
To have to go to bed by day?

As an interesting sidebar regarding this precious book...Little did I know until many years later that my mother suffered from Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy. That's why I was so sick as a child and spent so much time in bed. It's an amazing story in itself that I survived childhood at all, but without RLS' verses, I believe I would not be here today.

It's one of those books that go far deeper than even the author sometimes intended. I wonder what Robert would think of my story about his book?



Edited by mayneeyak (Wed Feb 08 2012 06:57 PM)
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#688445 - Thu Feb 09 2012 03:31 AM My Favourite book
ren33 Offline
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Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 12413
Loc: Kowloon Tong  Hong Kong      
Here's a new thread, all about books we love.
My favourite, as some of you know, is "The Wind in the Willows" I re read it when I feel ill, its a real comfort!
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#776358 - Mon Mar 05 2012 10:20 PM Re: My Favourite book
george48 Offline
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Registered: Wed Jul 01 2009
Posts: 334
Loc: Ottawa
  Ontario Canada   
They say that the first books you read as a youngster are the ones you remember all your life and i believe there is truth in that, because one of the first books i read when i was young was a book called 'Death Be Not Proud' written in 1949 by a man called John Gunther detailing his account of his son Johnny's battle with brain cancer that ultimately took his life at the age of seventeen.
His heartfelt and detailed story of a teenagers courageous battle is a bittersweet story that underscored that while death is the enemy, you need not face it with dread, but knowing that you are loved even as you die will give you courage to face the final enemy.
I have read so many books in my lifetime,but the ones that have made an impression on me number no more then 10 to 12,and this is one of them.

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#776478 - Tue Mar 06 2012 11:56 AM Re: My Favourite book
bubblesfun Offline
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Registered: Thu Jan 15 2009
Posts: 671
Loc: New York USA
My favorite comfort book is Bridge to Terabithia, although nothing cures the blues like a good romp with Princess Daisy or anything by Peter Lefcourt. I would say my favorite book of all time is Taylor Branch's Parting the Waters.
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#776505 - Tue Mar 06 2012 02:24 PM Re: My Favourite book
skunkee Offline
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Registered: Thu Oct 16 2003
Posts: 10542
Loc: Burlington Ontario Canada  
One of the earliest novels I remember reading that affected me profoundly was 'Mrs. Mike'. It's a true story of a young girl marrying an RCMP officer back in the time when they were everything in their remote communities. The hardships they faced were crippling, including the loss of her first family of children to diptheria. It was by Benedict and Nancy Freedman (Freeman?).
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#776977 - Wed Mar 07 2012 08:44 PM Re: My Favourite book
agony Offline

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Registered: Sat Mar 29 2003
Posts: 14830
Loc: Western Canada
Oh, I remember "Mrs Mike"! A Canadian classic, in its way.

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#784908 - Sun Apr 08 2012 07:31 PM Re: My Favourite book
momneedsanity Offline
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Registered: Sat Apr 07 2012
Posts: 8
Loc: Oklahoma USA
I am new to this site, so I don't know if it is okay for me to post here or not, but my favorite book is called Not My Daughter by Barbara Delinsky. It is about a woman who had her daughter at 17 and went on to become the principal of the high school in the town where she moved to after her parents kicked her out. When her daughter is also 17, she and a few of her friends make a pregnancy pact and... I don't want to give it all away, but suffice to say it is a really moving and wonderfully written book. I liked it because I myself became pregnant when I was 17 and had my son when I was 18, but unlike a lot of teen mothers I am happily married to my sons father and have been for nearly 7 years and we now have a second son and we are still planning on at least one more. Sorry if I am not supposed to post here unless I join the club or something, but I like to tell as many people about this book as I can since I love it so much.

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#784913 - Sun Apr 08 2012 07:52 PM Re: My Favourite book
ren33 Offline
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Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 12413
Loc: Kowloon Tong  Hong Kong      
MNS Welcome! Of course you are welcome to post here. Joining Funtrivia means you can post wherever you like in there and you are specially welcome at Books.
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#785072 - Mon Apr 09 2012 09:56 AM Re: My Favourite book
agony Offline

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Registered: Sat Mar 29 2003
Posts: 14830
Loc: Western Canada
Going back to Skunkee's choice of "Mrs Mike". Being reminded of it, I took it out from the library and reread it. Definitely old fashioned, but still a good book. I was interested, though, in how some details of life in Alberta could be so spot on, while some other things were just ridiculously incorrect. For example, they were living far north of Peace River when Mike had to go north to Blackfeet country - a good thousand miles in the wrong direction.

So I looked into it, and the authors were an American couple (rather interesting people, in their own right) who had been told her life story by the real Mrs Mike. Looks like the research they did to flesh out the bits that they didn't get from her was a little perfunctory.

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#788042 - Sat Apr 21 2012 05:02 AM Re: My Favourite book
authorspalace Offline
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Registered: Sat Apr 21 2012
Posts: 26
Loc: Washington DC  USA
My favorite book is The Scarlet Pimpernel. Has anyone out there read that?
I also like The Three Musketeers and Gulliver's Travels. Have any of you read those ones?
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#788076 - Sat Apr 21 2012 07:29 AM Re: My Favourite book
navaho56 Offline
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Registered: Sat Nov 24 2007
Posts: 14
Loc: Glasgow Scotland
At a pinch I would plump for ~

The Gormenghast series ~ Mervyn Peake

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#788080 - Sat Apr 21 2012 08:06 AM Re: My Favourite book
Dagny1 Offline
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Registered: Sun Nov 14 2010
Posts: 391
Loc: Alabama USA
Originally Posted By: authorspalace
My favorite book is The Scarlet Pimpernel. Has anyone out there read that?
I also like The Three Musketeers and Gulliver's Travels. Have any of you read those ones?


The Scarlet Pimpernel was a lot of fun! Did you know that it became a series?

Sequels to The Scarlet Pimpernel:
I Will Repay 1906
The Elusive Pimpernel 1908
Eldorado 1913
Lord Tony's Wife 1917
Triumph of the Scarlet Pimpernel 1922
League of the Scarlet Pimpernel
Adventures of the Scarlet Pimpernel 1929
Way of the Scarlet Pimpernel 1933
Sir Percy Hits Back 1936 or could be 1927

Prequels to The Scarlet Pimpernel:
The First Sir Percy
The Laughing Cavalier: A Story of the Ancestor of the Scarlet Pimpernel

Many of them are available free online in various formats. For Project Gutenberg's offerings, just go to:
http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/o and scroll down to Orczy. Have fun!

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#788081 - Sat Apr 21 2012 08:06 AM Re: My Favourite book
Chavs Offline
Prolific

Registered: Fri Jul 15 2011
Posts: 1142
Loc: Ireland
Originally Posted By: mayneeyak
RLS was such a sickly child. I relate to him in this way. How many times I read "A Child's Garden of Verses" while laying sick in bed is uncountable. The first several poems were actually dedicated to children who were bed-ridden, which I was far too often for far too long.

Yet I remember how A child's Garden kept me company and I'd often wake up clutching the book as a child would clutch a teddy bear.

Maybe this will 'ring a bell'...

Bed in Summer ~ by: Robert Louis Stevenson

From "A Child's Garden of Verses"

In winter I get up at night
And dress by yellow candle-light.
In summer quite the other way,
I have to go to bed by day.

I have to go to bed and see
The birds still hopping on the tree,
Or hear the grown-up people's feet
Still going past me in the street.

And does it not seem hard to you,
When all the sky is clear and blue,
And I should like so much to play,
To have to go to bed by day?

As an interesting sidebar regarding this precious book...Little did I know until many years later that my mother suffered from Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy. That's why I was so sick as a child and spent so much time in bed. It's an amazing story in itself that I survived childhood at all, but without RLS' verses, I believe I would not be here today.

It's one of those books that go far deeper than even the author sometimes intended. I wonder what Robert would think of my story about his book?




That's a wonderful tribute.

I spent a lot of time reading that Garden of Verses and a companion book (called a Child's treasury of Verse, I think, same publisher but a collection of poets). The poem rings very loud bells, and lines of it have often come to mind over the years. As do other poems from the book such as

WHOLE DUTY of CHILDREN


A child should always say what's true
And speak when he is spoken to,
And behave mannerly at table:
At least as far as he is able.

(the emphasis was mine). ;D


& very few children's poems can beat ''Faster than fairies..."

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#788084 - Sat Apr 21 2012 08:14 AM Re: My Favourite book
authorspalace Offline
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Registered: Sat Apr 21 2012
Posts: 26
Loc: Washington DC  USA
Yes, I read seven books in the whole series smile I love that series, it is so awesome! Are u a big fan of the series?
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#788093 - Sat Apr 21 2012 08:41 AM Re: My Favourite book
Dagny1 Offline
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Registered: Sun Nov 14 2010
Posts: 391
Loc: Alabama USA
Originally Posted By: authorspalace
Yes, I read seven books in the whole series smile I love that series, it is so awesome! Are u a big fan of the series?



I've only read a couple of The Scarlet Pimpernel books. I enjoyed it a lot, but they're not precisely my cup of tea. More like something in reserve in case I ever have extra reading time.

If you want a really long book with literally everything in it, try The Count of Monte Cristo if you haven't already read it. But be careful in the edition; many of them are abridged without mentioning it. I found one in my local library that left out entire chapters. It should have around 1,000 pages.

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#788096 - Sat Apr 21 2012 08:43 AM Re: My Favourite book
authorspalace Offline
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Registered: Sat Apr 21 2012
Posts: 26
Loc: Washington DC  USA
Yes I read The Count of Monte Cristo. Sadly it was one of those abridged versions.
Do you read a lot of classics?
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#788097 - Sat Apr 21 2012 08:47 AM Re: My Favourite book
Dagny1 Offline
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Registered: Sun Nov 14 2010
Posts: 391
Loc: Alabama USA
Originally Posted By: authorspalace
Yes I read The Count of Monte Cristo. Sadly it was one of those abridged versions.
Do you read a lot of classics?



Yes. I'd say classics are about 80% of what I read. I love 19th Century literature. Others have mentioned Wilkie Collins. He has some marvelous books--and all for free.

As to contemporary books, I read the odd one here and there and keep up with several mystery series, but that's about it.

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#790130 - Sat Apr 28 2012 11:47 PM Re: My Favourite book
MotherGoose Offline
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Registered: Mon Apr 22 2002
Posts: 4818
Loc: Western Australia
I find it hard to pick just one favourite.

Like ren, I loved "The Wind in the Willows" and still have my copy of that book. You can tell it has been read, but I have always been very fussy with my books and it's in really good condition considering its age, the number of times I have read it and the fact that it has travelled all over the world with me. It's definitely time I re-read it.

Other favourite books from my childhood that I loved enough to keep include the "Anne of Green Gables" series, "Manx Mouse" by Paul Gallico, and "Born Free" by Joy Adamson (which I am sure had a big influence on my decision to study biology for my degree).

Edited to add a P.S. I realised immediately after posting this, that the thread is entitled "My Favourite Book", not "My Favourite Childhood Book". I guess I got confused with another thread, as well as the fact that childhood has been mentioned several times in previous posts, so I limited myself to childhood books. However, my all-time favourite book is "To Kill a Mockingbird". Not surprisingly, it's also my favourite movie, and Gregory Peck is my favourite actor.


Edited by MotherGoose (Sat Apr 28 2012 11:52 PM)
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#823403 - Thu Sep 13 2012 05:10 PM Re: My Favourite book
Jazmee27 Offline
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Registered: Tue Mar 09 2010
Posts: 634
Loc: Pennsylvania USA
The first book I read that I remember making an impression wouldn’t be on my list of “favorites,” but it certainly had a profound impact because of the memory associated with it.

At the time, I was in elementary school and would often go to work with my mother when she finished up (she had to pick me up at a certain time from SACC or there was you-know-what to pay). So I would pack a book to read (I’ve always felt like if I didn’t have fresh reading material, I was drowning—this is indicated by the fact that aI read the pocket dictionary and the encyclopedia when there wasn’t anything else. Recently, though, I found I can make a combination the TV and online reading do the trick).

Anywayy, back to my story: I was reading “Howliday Inn” by James Howe, and the one and only part that stuck with me years later is the part where Chester the cat is poisoned (remember, associated memory).

I had just won a prize in SACC (a pet goldfish I named Goldie—later I got another fish, named Blackie, and I later forgot which one came first). The day I read that chapter in that book, I got home to find Goldie dead—and, that night, I had nightmares about someone poisoning my fish.

As for all-time favorite, don’t have one… there are just too many books that have an impression (some of them are ones I actually read in Braille, while others—a lot of others—I listen to on audio).

Several of the audio are sent to me from the library on digital cartridge, and some of those are adapted from commercial audiobooks and produced by “Brilliance Audio.” Some of those have been really good (of course, it depends on the narrator—some of the “noncommercial” books are just as well done). I’ve read the reviews of the books I remember most, “Song of the Dragon,” “The Ghost King,” and “Warbreaker,” and have found that many people find it lacking for one reason or another. But the way they were “performed” made all the difference to me.

My most recent favorite on digital book was “Intrigues: The Collegium Chronicles, Book 2.” For the most part, except for a few parts, the first book (called “Foundation”) was boring, even with the narrator.

Another book I remember comparing to another one by the same author was “The God of the Hive.” I found myself thinking, after listening to the jacket information, about “Justice Hall.” It was one of those (like “Ghost King” and the other two I mentioned above), that I actually listened to more than once. I then sent it back, then later wished I’d held on to it (the library in question doesn’t charge any late fees—users can keep the books as long as they want).

A few years ago, before the books came in digital, I would listen to “The Mage Winds” and other trilogies by Mercedes Lackey on their cassette player (it’s a four-track). Then the player broke down, and I’ve yet to order a new one, so I canceled all my tape magazines (including “Asimov’s Science Fiction” and “Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine.” One of these days, I really need to remedy that—some of those short works were pretty good.


And then I realized: I actually forgot my all-time favorite from high school. I was remindecd as I scrolled down the other posts. At the word “classic,” I thought, “Oh!”

Years ago I had a copy of “A Tale of Two Cities” on cassette. It was an abridged, and though I mind that with most books, I didn’t care with this as it was a very good version. Sadly, over time… well, you know what happens to cassettes the more they’re used.

Actually, I’ll take that back somewhat. Sometimes, it doesn’t really matter how many times you’ve listened to it. I’ve gotten brand new books that had to be trashed because one or two tapes were “fading in and out real fast” (the book was a present from my friend, and she actually looked for CDs, but couldn’t find any for that book).

I’ve also always liked “To Kill a Mockingbird,” even in nith grade when my class was forced to read it. (Most of the class hated it—as well as the teacher who assigned it.)
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#823417 - Thu Sep 13 2012 06:55 PM Re: My Favourite book
Dagny1 Offline
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Registered: Sun Nov 14 2010
Posts: 391
Loc: Alabama USA
Originally Posted By: Jazmee27
As for all-time favorite, don’t have one… there are just too many books that have an impression (some of them are ones I actually read in Braille, while others—a lot of others—I listen to on audio).



Project Gutenberg had quite a few audio books now. Some are human-read, others are machine-generated. All are free!
The general page for audio books:
http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Gutenberg:The_Audio_Books_Project
Or skip directly to human-read:
http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/categories/1

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#827300 - Thu Sep 27 2012 10:05 AM Re: My Favourite book
einsteinII Offline
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Registered: Fri Jul 20 2012
Posts: 47
Loc: Missouri USA
My favorite book/books were written by Patrick O'Brien about a sea captain, Aubry and his medical sidekick. Very entertaining.

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