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#971324 - Sat Mar 09 2013 04:19 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
ssabreman Offline
Prolific

Registered: Wed Nov 03 2010
Posts: 1631
Loc: Arizona USA
Not a benevolent question.

Benevolence
Your answer: the quality of being kind and generous

the quality of being kind and generous is the definition for "bigheartedness"

The correct answer was an act intending or showing kindness and good will

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#971751 - Mon Mar 11 2013 07:21 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
Tekka Offline
Explorer

Registered: Fri Sep 07 2012
Posts: 77
Loc: Vancouver
BC Canada
On in my last set was:

'Make off with the belongings of others'

Answer: Cabbage

Never heard of that one.

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#971784 - Mon Mar 11 2013 10:13 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
looney_tunes Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Tue Jan 20 2009
Posts: 3240
Loc: Briar Hill Victoria Australia 
From http://www.thefreedictionary.com/cabbage :

cabbage Brit slang
vb
to steal; pilfer
[of uncertain origin; perhaps related to Old French cabas theft]
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#971964 - Tue Mar 12 2013 10:10 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
ASA Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Tue Oct 15 2002
Posts: 4225
Loc: Adelaide
  SA Australia   
8. Toque


The correct answer was a small round woman's hat


If the woman is a bit bigger or not quite round can she still where a Toque ?
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#971999 - Wed Mar 13 2013 01:51 AM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: looney_tunes]
Tekka Offline
Explorer

Registered: Fri Sep 07 2012
Posts: 77
Loc: Vancouver
BC Canada
Thanks for enlightening me Looney. I was born and raised in Britain but had never heard of the word cabbage being used that way - now I know:-)

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#972014 - Wed Mar 13 2013 03:28 AM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
looney_tunes Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Tue Jan 20 2009
Posts: 3240
Loc: Briar Hill Victoria Australia 
It's useful to remember that this game doesn't make up the definition on-site - they are taken from an online dictionary or database. And, unfortunately, sometimes that dictionary has definitions that are actually incorrect, or at least a bit askew. Nevertheless, there is really nothing constructive to do except to learn the 'wrong' definition so you will recognise it again in the future. As a bonus, you will also meet them in Mind Melt.
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#972050 - Wed Mar 13 2013 05:23 AM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: Tekka]
Chavs Offline
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Registered: Fri Jul 15 2011
Posts: 1081
Loc: Ireland
Originally Posted By: Tekka
Thanks for enlightening me Looney. I was born and raised in Britain but had never heard of the word cabbage being used that way - now I know:-)


Same here! Following your mention of it I had a google around and see that several sites link it to a 17th century use where a tailor would "cabbage" the bits of leftover material from a job and use them to make something else. Technically the material belonged to the customer so the tailor would technically be stealing.

Originally Posted By: ASA
8. Toque


The correct answer was a small round woman's hat


If the woman is a bit bigger or not quite round can she still where a Toque ?


lol ASA! I have often laughed at that one too. smile

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#972478 - Thu Mar 14 2013 04:52 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
DocWhispers Offline
Participant

Registered: Wed Apr 25 2012
Posts: 9
Loc: Maryland USA
"track star is related to wizard"

Because Gandalf is just like Jesse Owens.

Riiiight.

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#972489 - Thu Mar 14 2013 05:45 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
mehaul Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Wed Feb 03 2010
Posts: 5396
Loc: Florida USA
So, is our word Cab (for taxi) derived from being taken for a ride? smile
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#972496 - Thu Mar 14 2013 07:09 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: DocWhispers]
TimBentley Offline
Explorer

Registered: Mon Apr 09 2012
Posts: 85
Loc: Indiana USA
Originally Posted By: DocWhispers
"track star is related to wizard"

Because Gandalf is just like Jesse Owens.

Riiiight.



One definition of wizard: someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field.

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#972522 - Thu Mar 14 2013 10:20 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
bitterlyold Offline
Forum Adept

Registered: Sat Oct 15 2011
Posts: 121
Loc: Arkansas USA
I am an English teacher in the US. I know we all have our differences, and I appreciate that we can laugh at them. WW tickles me no end many days.

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#972614 - Fri Mar 15 2013 01:10 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
Midget40 Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Mon Oct 27 2008
Posts: 5056
Loc: Perth Western Australia       
The site of the World Trade Center before it was destroyed

Your answer: ground zero

This is terrible grammer - the site of the World Trade Centre BEFORE it was destroyed is the World Trade Centre.

Ground Zero is the Site of the World Trade Cente AFTER it was destroyed

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#972793 - Sat Mar 16 2013 11:28 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
maninmidohio Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Mon Dec 03 2007
Posts: 7484
Loc: Newark Ohio USA               
2. Make a rattling sound
Your answer: rattle

rattle means "make short successive sounds"

The correct answer was brattle

I think I have a good case to argue here. I was robbed. (At least I got my letter.)

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#972811 - Sun Mar 17 2013 09:39 AM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: maninmidohio]
jickie Offline
Participant

Registered: Fri Feb 15 2013
Posts: 6
Loc: Ontario Canada
Originally Posted By: maninmidohio
2. Make a rattling sound
Your answer: rattle

rattle means "make short successive sounds"

The correct answer was brattle

I think I have a good case to argue here. I was robbed. (At least I got my letter.)


I had the same set and totally agree. I understand both words are correct answers but I thought I was playing Word Wizzard not Obscurity.

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#972964 - Mon Mar 18 2013 03:27 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
zippolover Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Fri Nov 16 2012
Posts: 5717
Loc: Norfolk UK
I just got this one:

14. A metrical unit with unstressed-unstressed syllables

Your answer: pyrrhic

I got it right because I knew that it was none of the other answers, BUT I do not understand the answer. I looked it up online and in a paper dictionary, but am still none the wiser.

Can someone please un-confuse me?
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#972988 - Mon Mar 18 2013 04:51 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
flopsymopsy Offline
Moderator

Registered: Sat May 17 2008
Posts: 2879
Loc: Northampton England UK      
It's in Webster's online dictionary:

"a metrical foot consisting of two short or unaccented syllables"

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pyrrhic
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#973003 - Mon Mar 18 2013 09:50 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
agony Offline

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Registered: Sat Mar 29 2003
Posts: 11928
Loc: Western Canada
I assume that is a foot as in poetry, not a foot as in inches and yards.

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#973025 - Tue Mar 19 2013 01:23 AM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
zippolover Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Fri Nov 16 2012
Posts: 5717
Loc: Norfolk UK
Yes, I found that and do not get it
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#973029 - Tue Mar 19 2013 01:54 AM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
looney_tunes Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Tue Jan 20 2009
Posts: 3240
Loc: Briar Hill Victoria Australia 
Poetry is broken up into segments called feet, with characteristic rhythms or stress patterns. An iamb, for example, is an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed one (think Shakespeare's usual rhythm pattern of iambic pentameter, or lines with five feet each containing an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed one); a dactyl is a stressed syllable followed by two unstressed ones (my high school teacher told us that the Iliad was written in dactylic hexameter, and that was the rhythmic pattern used in the translation we read; Iliad is an example of a dactyl). Similarly, if a section has two unstressed syllables, it is called a pyhrric foot. A spondee has two stressed syllables, and there are a number of other common patterns, each of which is given a name to describe it.
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#973035 - Tue Mar 19 2013 02:44 AM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
zippolover Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Fri Nov 16 2012
Posts: 5717
Loc: Norfolk UK
Thank you

Could you give me an example of "... two unstressed syllables, it is called a pyhrric foot"? because that is the part that I cannot get onboard
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#973036 - Tue Mar 19 2013 03:33 AM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
looney_tunes Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Tue Jan 20 2009
Posts: 3240
Loc: Briar Hill Victoria Australia 
Here's an explanation with an example. It should be noted that it is a very rare metrical pattern, and some would prefer to analyse the poetic line so as to avoid its use. Scansion is an art, not a science. The example given is pyhrric/spondee, which could equally be called ionic (unstressed, unstressed, stressed, stressed). It could also be scanned as unstressed, unstressed, stressed / stressed, unstressed, unstressed / stressed, stressed - anapest/dactyl/spondee.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrrhic

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/metrical+foot
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#973037 - Tue Mar 19 2013 03:40 AM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
zippolover Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Fri Nov 16 2012
Posts: 5717
Loc: Norfolk UK
Thank you very much, I think that I get it now. It looks to me like two filler words thrown in to add needed length to a line in a poem and unimportant in any other sense in the poem!
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#973039 - Tue Mar 19 2013 05:40 AM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
flopsymopsy Offline
Moderator

Registered: Sat May 17 2008
Posts: 2879
Loc: Northampton England UK      
I'm glad that Looney didn't quote any of my epic verses as an example of words thrown in any which way or she might have found herself with a starring role in the next Llamas Christmas Poem. laugh
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#973545 - Thu Mar 21 2013 07:20 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
ssabreman Offline
Prolific

Registered: Wed Nov 03 2010
Posts: 1631
Loc: Arizona USA
8. Inability to perceive written words
Your answer: dyslexia

dyslexia means "impaired ability to learn to read"

The correct answer was visual aphasia

Really? I had trouble reading that one...or was it an inability to perceive the written words.

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#973550 - Thu Mar 21 2013 08:15 PM Re: Word Wizard - Content Issues [Re: JMElston]
looney_tunes Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Tue Jan 20 2009
Posts: 3240
Loc: Briar Hill Victoria Australia 
Dyslexia means an impaired ability to perceive words, while aphasia (also sometimes called alexia) refers to a complete lack of the ability.
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