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#963062 - Fri Jan 25 2013 06:15 AM Memories of Playthings
ren33 Offline
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Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 11641
Loc: Fanling
  Hong Kong      
In the Photo a day thread we were talking about old toys and games, well mainly about jacks or fivestones or knucklebones. What games and toys did you like?
I say this because try asking some children here in Hong Kong what toys they have and they say they don't have any. No dolls, no lego, no cars , nothing, just playstations and iphones etc.That's all they play with.So sad.
I have such memories of rollerskates (the kind with a key, not rollerboots), dollshouses, paper cut out dolls, jigsaws, windup toys etc etc. What about you?
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#963063 - Fri Jan 25 2013 06:36 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
Santana2002 Offline
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Skipping rope figured in many of my childhood play times, as did lego, dolls, paper cut out dolls, homemade karts made from buggy wheels and scrap wood, nails, and a bit of imagination, and I remember loving a tin spinning top we had.

My most precious 'toy' was a gold coloured china coffee set. It was the real deal as my mother had given me hers. From an adult's point of view I now realise the thing was hideous and I fully understand my mum giving it to me to play with, but as a kid I thought it was the height of luxury!

Board games and playing cards kept us busy on bad weather days, Cluedo, Scrabble, Ludo, chess and draughts, and I personally loathed Monopoly and refused to play.

Books from the library, or very rarely, actually bought for me, were (and still are) my favourites.

Over all, however, my three siblings and I stored all our toys in one toy chest between the four of us, about the size of a small blanket box.
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#963075 - Fri Jan 25 2013 08:24 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
sue943 Offline

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Every Christmas one of us received a Compendium of board games so ludo, snakes and ladders etc. Paper cut out dolls for me too, jigsaws, knitting needles and wool were toys to me, and books! We used to make our own, things like making miniature gardens in a biscuit tin lid using mosses and broken china. We didn't really have many toys at all, we were very poor.
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#963080 - Fri Jan 25 2013 08:54 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
AlexxSchneider Offline
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Registered: Fri Jun 26 2009
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Loc: Perth Scotland UK             
I was big on Lego and Barbies as a child. And jigsaws, too, but I still do jigsaws - I received a lovely set for my recent birthday, actually.
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#963103 - Fri Jan 25 2013 10:28 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: AlexxSchneider]
JaneMarple Offline
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Sindys were always popular. I "inherited" a few dolls and some furniture from older cousins. And books - library books, "inherited" books, my own books. Even now, I'm not all that far away from a book laugh
Legos - I spent literally hours constructing little houses etc. But my favourite "toy" would have been jigsaws. Mum taught me the joy of jigsaws from a young age - as she was one of 13, she also came from a family of jigsaw fans. I don't do as many jigsaws as I used to do, but I still get pleasure of doing one once or twice a year.
The beauty of "old toys" - jigsaws, legos, dominoes - they can be played with by the new generation. The two "Princes" love playing with dominoes at the moment smile
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#963130 - Fri Jan 25 2013 11:44 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
argus9 Offline
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Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 854
Loc: Winnipeg Manitoba Canada   
One of the toys I cherished as a young lad was one I received in our Christmas parcel sent by my Nan in England to us in Canada. My mum was a war bride and every year her Mum would send things that she missed from England, even a Christmas Pudding. One year she sent me a windup double decker bus. When you turned it on it would run for a few seconds,a bell would ring once, it would stop, then a second later, would ring twice and the bus would start again. Hours of fun. I wish I still had it.


Edited by argus9 (Fri Jan 25 2013 11:45 AM)
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#963142 - Fri Jan 25 2013 01:11 PM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
sisterseagull Offline
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Registered: Tue Aug 16 2011
Posts: 199
Loc: Torquay Devon England UK      
Two toys have stuck in my mind.... At the age of about 4 I was given a train set known as 'Big, Big Train' and the other, which I had for my sixth birthday was a toy rifle called a 'Johnny Seven' which was brilliaaaaaant! Haha

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#963223 - Fri Jan 25 2013 05:23 PM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
Santana2002 Offline
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Registered: Mon Apr 14 2003
Posts: 8425
Loc: France
Did anybody else make 'perfume' in the summer: rose petals and any nice-smelling flower petals, mixed with water in a jam jar with a fallen twig?

Another summer favourite was to have a competition: who could collect the most bees in a jam jar in an afternoon. The later the day got the more dangerous it became to manoeuvre the lid open enough to capture a new 'pet' without the irate inmates escaping and wreaking their revenge on you.

At the end of the day, or when you didn't feel brave enought to continue collecting, you would become 'bored' with the game and open the lid and let the hapless prisoners escape, keeping well out of the way yourself.

A magnifying glass was a fine thing to have on a sunny day: you could start fires in paper handkerchiefs, or pyrograve/etch scribblings in a piece of wood.

It really didn't take much to keep us amused. The great outdoors was our playroom, we hung out with the neighbourhood kids, played ball, chased and raced and played giant steps, I spy, red rover and heaps of other similar games. Actual toys were relatively few and far between, and we certainly never felt that we needed more than we had.

I did have an awful hankering for a Sindy doll (gosh, I had forgotten that). My best friend had six and I hadn't a single one, and I was sooooo jealous of her.
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#963403 - Sat Jan 26 2013 01:43 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
Lones78 Offline
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My favourites were Lego, Barbies and jigsaws.

My son now has all my Lego from when I was young (and then some!), and I have my own Lego now - although my kids aren't allowed to touch it!

My daughter has my Barbies but she's still a little young to play with them - maybe a few more years.

I still do jigsaws when I can. My kids love them as well, I think jigsaws soothing and good for the brain.

I get a kick out of the face that my kids are playing with my old toys (my daughter also has my oldest doll, it's her favourite), and adding their own to them. Hopefully their kids will also get many hours out of enjoyment out of (what will be) nanna's old toys!
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#963958 - Mon Jan 28 2013 11:31 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: Lones78]
MotherGoose Offline
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Being an only child I probably had more toys than most of my contemporaries, but nowhere near the amount that children today seem to have. My mother worked for a man who imported toys so my mother could get them wholesale (not that she went overboard with indulgence).

I had more books than anything else and spent many hours reading. Collecting comics was also very popular. We didn't watch TV because broadcasting didn't start until late in the afternoon.

I did have lots of friends and when they came over, we played board games - my favourites were Sorry and Chinese Checkers. I had Monopoly but never played it - I hated it too, Santana. I still have those three board games.

My dad built a cubby house up the back yard and my grandfather made some furniture (doll's cot and table/chairs) so we played house with our dolls and our tea sets. We used the "nuts" from the jacaranda trees as "money" and concocted mud pies and soups and stews using sand, pebbles and leaves. You got bonus points if you could con somebody's little brother or sister to taste test it.

I always wanted a Sindy doll but my mother wouldn't buy me one for some reason. I really envied the girl over the back fence who was the only one in the neighbourhood with a Sindy doll (some had Barbies but most of us didn't have either doll).

I inherited a Barbie doll from a friend of the family but it just wasn't the same. I passed it on in turn to my younger cousin. As Barbies go, she was superior to the type you get today. She had rubbery, rather than plastic, skin and she had internal joints (which didn't show) so you could sit her on a chair with her legs crossed, and fold her arms. Her hair was also much thicker and you could not see the hair plugs like you can with today's dolls. By the way, I never did get a Sindy doll!

I still have several of my old dolls as well as my teddy bear. My mum used to sew and knit clothes for them.

We also had paper dolls, but they weren't that popular. Other toys I remember included French knitting dolls (if your parents couldn't or wouldn't buy them, you could make one with a cotton reel and four nails), frisbees (using the lid from an icecream container), and yoyos (the ones with the Coca-Cola logo were the "cool" ones to have). Lego wasn't around in those days but Meccano was popular with the boys.

We have a Museum of Childhood in our town. I don't know what it costs to get in there these days but when coolcat90 was little, it only cost $2.00 and the children were allowed to play with most of the exhibits. We used to go there every school holiday. The place was full of the types of toys mentioned in this thread. Coolcat90's favourites were the dress-up drawer full of costuming, the puppet theatre and puppets, and Snakes and Ladders. Lones, your children would probably love this place.


Edited by MotherGoose (Mon Jan 28 2013 11:46 AM)
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#964012 - Mon Jan 28 2013 01:36 PM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: MotherGoose]
JaneMarple Offline
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Mum used to make my Sindy dolls new clothes every Christmas, and seeming I had about 20, it was a good way to keep her knitting needles/sewing machine busy.
I forgot the Fisher Price toys too. I really did have hours of fun with those, especially the tree house and the school house
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#964019 - Mon Jan 28 2013 02:15 PM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
sue943 Offline

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Gosh, French knitting, yes I spent hours with a cotton reel and scraps of wool.
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#964055 - Mon Jan 28 2013 04:33 PM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
guitargoddess Offline
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Registered: Mon Jul 09 2007
Posts: 35728
Loc: Ottawa Ontario Canada         
I was way into Barbies. Polly Pocket but not like today's Polly Pocket. The ones I had were teeny little things that went inside a little home that looked like a makeup compact. Spirograph and various Crayola and similar craft/art kits. My favourite was Speak N Spell smile
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#964058 - Mon Jan 28 2013 04:54 PM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
salami_swami Offline
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I was born into video games. That was my main play-thing for most of my memoried life...

And Beanie Babies.
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#964096 - Mon Jan 28 2013 09:33 PM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
george48 Offline
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Registered: Wed Jul 01 2009
Posts: 319
Loc: Ottawa
  Ontario Canada   
Hot Wheel cars and tracks, Tonka Trucks,( those things were indestructible), a set of six shooters with the belt,wore those things everywhere, and something called a Barrel of Monkeys, where you tried to lift all the monkeys out of the barrel at once by hooking them together, and one of my favorites, Crokinole,am i spelling that right?

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#964107 - Tue Jan 29 2013 12:01 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
Copago Offline
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Registered: Tue May 15 2001
Posts: 14270
Loc: Australia
Quote:
I say this because try asking some children here in Hong Kong what toys they have and they say they don't have any. No dolls, no lego, no cars , nothing, just playstations and iphones etc.That's all they play with.So sad.


Wow, that really is sad. frown Mine does have an ipod and other electronic things but it's on limited time and he has lots of proper toys and could probably build an entire house with lego and other bricks lol

The toys I remember back in my day were the knuckles .. we played them a LOT. Anyone else do elastics in the playground? I had lots of teddy bears when I was younger too shocked

Rollerskates and skateboards and lots of time in the backyard playing cricket or hockey.

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#964114 - Tue Jan 29 2013 01:12 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
ren33 Offline
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Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 11641
Loc: Fanling
  Hong Kong      
Yes, it's true, Jill . The excuse is that parents are always working and do not have time to play with their children; electronic games, presumably do not need input from an adult. Have you heard the one about not letting children play with bikes and skates, it is dangerous. I quote one mother:
"I took her ice skating, but she fell down so I didn't take her again!!!" (seriously).
Children here have choices. They do homework or they go to extra tutorial lessons.If they want to go swimming, they have swimming lessons, ditto with football, running or any sport, they play instruments(not for enjoyment, for diplomas), art... ditto, in fact name any activity and it is rarely done for sheer fun, more for status.I sound bitter and twisted, but it is a fact.
As a consequence there are very few children who actually play for playing's sake, therefore toys are not a priority. The kindergartens are fighting a brave battle, but the fact is it is hard to motivate a child to play imaginary , pretend games when an electronic gadget does it all for you.
End of grumpy old rant.
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#964117 - Tue Jan 29 2013 02:01 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: MotherGoose]
Lones78 Offline
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Registered: Mon Apr 27 2009
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Loc: Forrestfield Western Australia
Originally Posted By: MotherGoose


We have a Museum of Childhood in our town. I don't know what it costs to get in there these days but when coolcat90 was little, it only cost $2.00 and the children were allowed to play with most of the exhibits. We used to go there every school holiday. The place was full of the types of toys mentioned in this thread. Coolcat90's favourites were the dress-up drawer full of costuming, the puppet theatre and puppets, and Snakes and Ladders. Lones, your children would probably love this place.


I have never heard of this place MotherGoose. I will have to do a search to find out where it is. You are right, my kids (especially my daughter) will love this place!


Edit: Oh, I just searched for it and all the items have been donated to the WA museum (from the previous owners at a university) and are in storage waiting for the new museum - I think due to open in about 5-10 years time frown


Edited by Lones78 (Tue Jan 29 2013 02:04 AM)
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#964118 - Tue Jan 29 2013 03:46 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: Lones78]
MotherGoose Offline
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Registered: Mon Apr 22 2002
Posts: 4365
Loc: Western Australia
Re elastics - yes, elastics was extremely popular at school when I was a child. Funnily enough, though, we never played it at home, only at school. We made our own using ordinary elastic purchased in the haberdashery department. However, now you can buy it in a kit with an instruction book and the elastic comes in bright fluoro colours.

Re Spirograph - I'd forgotten that one. I spent hours playing with my Spirograph. It was a good toy for an only child.

Re danger. We frequently played in the playground at our school on the weekends, playing on the monkey bars, jungle gym and swings, shooting goals on the netball court, or playing tennis on the tennis court, or just riding our bikes around in the quadrangle. Kids can't do those things any more because of liability issues. Also, vandalism has meant that a lot of schools are now fenced in instead of being open.


Quote:
Oh, I just searched for it and all the items have been donated to the WA museum (from the previous owners at a university) and are in storage waiting for the new museum - I think due to open in about 5-10 years time


What a shame it's not open right now. When we used to go there, it was located at the old Claremont Teacher's College which now belongs to UWA. It was lots of fun and at only $2, it was a cheap treat for the school holidays.
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#964121 - Tue Jan 29 2013 04:17 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: MotherGoose]
MotherGoose Offline
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Registered: Mon Apr 22 2002
Posts: 4365
Loc: Western Australia
Quote:
Children here have choices. They do homework or they go to extra tutorial lessons.If they want to go swimming, they have swimming lessons, ditto with football, running or any sport, they play instruments(not for enjoyment, for diplomas), art... ditto, in fact name any activity and it is rarely done for sheer fun, more for status.


It's like that here too, Ren. When coolcat90 was in school, the mothers would get together and brag about how many extracurricular activities their kids were involved in. They would complain about having to drive the kids to all these activities but you knew that they were mentally patting themselves on the back for being a "good parent".

When I was a child, I really wanted to do some of the those activities, like Brownies, but wasn't allowed to, partly because it wasn't affordable and partly because transport was difficult. So when coolcat90 was little, I wanted her to have the opportunity to do those things that I wasn't able to. However, I never pushed her into anything - I only encouraged her to follow her own passions.

I also put a limit on activities - no more than two extra-curricular activities at a time. If she wanted to try something new, she had to decide which current activity was going to be dropped. We also had a rule that if she chose a team sport, she wasn't allowed to drop that sport in the middle of the season. She had to see it through to the end and not let the team down.

Her passions turned out to be swimming and dance. However, she tried her hand at a number of things, including gymnastics, archery, teeball, netball, karate, horse-riding, piano and guitar.

Now I work in developmental paediatrics and I am amazed at how many kids have extra-curricular activities every day after school, and all weekend too. As Ren mentioned, there is also tutoring at home, and/or having access to an educational aide at school for one-on-one assistance. We even get pressured by parents and schools who want the doctor to diagnose some kind of specific learning disability or psychiatric disorder because government funding can be obtained if you can get particular diagnoses.

There's also a host of medical terminology to go with this. You've probably heard of dyslexia (difficulty reading). But if a child has difficulty with maths, it's called dyscalculia, and poor or slow handwriting is dysgraphia. When Johnny is naughty he is suffering from ODD (oppositional defiant disorder) or emotional dysregulation - I am NOT kidding! I could go on and on, but you get the idea.
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#964123 - Tue Jan 29 2013 05:57 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: george48]
Chavs Offline
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Originally Posted By: george48
Hot Wheel cars and tracks, Tonka Trucks,( those things were indestructible), a set of six shooters with the belt,wore those things everywhere, and something called a Barrel of Monkeys, where you tried to lift all the monkeys out of the barrel at once by hooking them together, and one of my favorites, Crokinole,am i spelling that right?


Never heard of Crockinole but the monkeys were a regular. Still have some somewhere. And pick-up-sticks.

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#964124 - Tue Jan 29 2013 05:59 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: MotherGoose]
Chavs Offline
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Registered: Fri Jul 15 2011
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Originally Posted By: MotherGoose
Re elastics - yes, elastics was extremely popular at school when I was a child. Funnily enough, though, we never played it at home, only at school. We made our own using ordinary elastic purchased in the haberdashery department. However, now you can buy it in a kit with an instruction book and the elastic comes in bright fluoro colours.


Yes! That was a fun game. And no such thing as a kit needed! But how weird, now you say it, I think we only played it in the playground too rather than at home. Maybe at home there were better things to do than jump over a piece of elastic, lol!

(Or maybe it was the lack of girls on my street...as I was writing the next post that suddenly dawned on me...)


Edited by Chavs (Tue Jan 29 2013 06:08 AM)

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#964125 - Tue Jan 29 2013 06:07 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: Santana2002]
Chavs Offline
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Registered: Fri Jul 15 2011
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Loc: Ireland
Originally Posted By: Santana2002
Did anybody else make 'perfume' in the summer: rose petals and any nice-smelling flower petals, mixed with water in a jam jar with a fallen twig?


YES! That's mandatory, I thought? It was mostly a waste of time though, the concoction never smelled anything like perfume did. laugh

Quote:
Another summer favourite was to have a competition: who could collect the most bees in a jam jar in an afternoon. The later the day got the more dangerous it became to manoeuvre the lid open enough to capture a new 'pet' without the irate inmates escaping and wreaking their revenge on you.

At the end of the day, or when you didn't feel brave enought to continue collecting, you would become 'bored' with the game and open the lid and let the hapless prisoners escape, keeping well out of the way yourself.


You cruel things, lol! That's hilarious, I never heard of such a game but it sounds dangerously fun. The kids of my age on my street were all boys so I was forced into Tomboyism and there was nettle-clasping, throwing stones under cars and cutting up worms - but no bee charming.

frown I really prefered Sindys.

Did you buy a Sindy when you grew up?

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#964128 - Tue Jan 29 2013 06:44 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
golfmom08 Offline
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Registered: Sun Feb 20 2011
Posts: 181
Loc: Florida USA        
The toy I remember most fondly was called "Showboat". It was an actual pink showboat that had all the little pieces, characters, backdrops to change and stage props to put on plays. The ones I remember are "The Wizard of Oz" and "Heidi". It even included the scripts! I wish I still had it because I saw it a Toy memorabilia show for $300.00! The other things I played with were hula hoops, jump ropes, jacks, and cars with my brother. Of course we were outside all the time. I was not a doll person!

My daughter is 18 now and only last October got an iPhone for her birthday. I've made sure she spends time outside by affording her horseback riding since she was 8!


Edited by golfmom08 (Tue Jan 29 2013 06:45 AM)
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#964129 - Tue Jan 29 2013 06:50 AM Re: Memories of Playthings [Re: ren33]
Daaanieeel Offline
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Registered: Sat Oct 01 2011
Posts: 133
Loc: Perth WA Australia           
Ah, the nostalgia... I am the youngest of four, so I had a lot of hand-me-downs. Matchbox cars were always my favourite, and whenever I got a new one it was THE best thing. I also loved trains, and had a wooden train track where you could build the circuit, and also had a small collection of trains to go with the set. One was battery run, so it went around automatically, and a few other manual ones where you pushed them around. I had a HUGE collection of stuffed toys, a lot of them hand-me-downs, and most of them dogs, birds or bears. I also had numerous toys from various tv show, movie etc franchises, and LEGO. I wasn't great at building LEGO, but I loved playing with the finished product. Nintendo GameBoys and GameBoy Colours were pretty big when they came out as well. And then there were the sticks we used as make-believe swords, and plenty of trees to climb. And reading of course, which I still thoroughly enjoy.


Edited by Daaanieeel (Tue Jan 29 2013 08:12 AM)
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