Rules: Read Me!
Admin: sue943
Legal / Conditions of Use

Page 9 of 18 < 1 2 ... 7 8 9 10 11 ... 17 18 >
Topic Options
#965532 - Mon Feb 04 2013 07:58 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
pyonir Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Sat Apr 25 2009
Posts: 816
Loc: Minnesota USA
I went through a couple more memoirs.

"Fish: A Memoir of a Boy in a Man's Prison" by T. J. Parsell and "Autobiography of a Recovering Skinhead" by Frank Meeink. Both had very horrific content, as you might expect, but both had redeeming stories as well. I always find it interesting to get a perspective from 'fringe' (for lack of a better word) groups in society and neither of these books disappointed. If you find sociology, true crime, or memoirs interesting, I'd recommend both books, keeping in mind the content is what you'd expect it to be and can be stomach churning (and anger inducing) at times.

Top
#966285 - Sat Feb 09 2013 12:15 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: pyonir]
skunkee Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Thu Oct 16 2003
Posts: 9019
Loc: Burlington Ontario Canada  
"Red Mist" by Patricia Cornwell. She has had some really good books but I lose interest when she starts presenting her lead character as a superwoman. This book is shaping up to be one of those.
_________________________
Editor: Movies/Celebrities/Crosswords

"To insult someone we call him 'bestial'. For deliberate cruelty and nature, 'human' might be the greater insult." - Isaac Asimov

Top
#966290 - Sat Feb 09 2013 12:30 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
agony Offline

Administrator

Registered: Sat Mar 29 2003
Posts: 11734
Loc: Western Canada
That's pretty much why I stopped reading her books, skunkee. I found, too, after reading quite a few of her books, that I was thinking "Y'know, I don't actually LIKE any of these people".

Top
#966294 - Sat Feb 09 2013 01:14 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
bloodandsand Offline
Participant

Registered: Sun Apr 08 2012
Posts: 44
Loc: Greater Manchester England UK
Agony, I completely agree. The more I read of the series, the more I started disliking Scarpetta. Benton seems like the only character to have any warmth in his personality.

Top
#966296 - Sat Feb 09 2013 01:22 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Jazmee27 Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Tue Mar 09 2010
Posts: 634
Loc: Pennsylvania USA
Just started “Luca and the Fire of Life” by Salman Rushdie the other day. It was one of those I almost didn’t read, afraid I wouldn’t like it, but once I started… The novel tells the story of a twelve-year-old boy who tries to save his father from “the big sleep.” One of the funniest parts is how he has two friends—they startecd out as pets but grew to be so much more—named Dog the Bear and Bear the Dog. Very well-written, and quite enjoyable for those who like magic and related themes.
_________________________
(1) Young I may be, but even young people are entitled to their opinions.
(2)Attempting to silence me doesn't hurt me, but the silencer.
(3) I must remain true to myself.

Top
#966335 - Sat Feb 09 2013 03:47 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Copago Offline
Moderator

Registered: Tue May 15 2001
Posts: 14157
Loc: Australia
I seem to barely read a proper book these days but for Christmas I got
"Danny Baker Going to Sea in a Seive". (He's a English radio personality).
It's good fun and I'm getting through it slowly but surely.

Top
#966371 - Sat Feb 09 2013 07:30 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Dagny1 Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: Sun Nov 14 2010
Posts: 241
Loc: Alabama USA
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair.
This book is a real eye-opener about the meat-packing industry and the plight of immigrants. I avoided reading it for a long time because I thought it would be either too dry or too depressing for my tastes, but that's not the case at all. I really feel like I know the characters and care about them. Even when reading of horrific conditions, the story pulls me along because I care what happens to them.

Top
#966373 - Sat Feb 09 2013 07:35 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: Santana2002]
Dagny1 Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: Sun Nov 14 2010
Posts: 241
Loc: Alabama USA
Originally Posted By: Santana2002
have finally come to the last delicious word on the last delicious page of Zola's "au Bonheur des Dames", and thoroughly enjoyed every page of it.


I also found it an absolutely delightful book! So un-Zola like. It's recommended for anyone who usually passes on Zola's books because they find them too dark.

Per usual, Zola did plenty of research prior to writing Au Bonheur des dames. It's a good primer for the history of the first gigantic department stores. I would have liked to have been a fly on the wall to see Zola shopping for hours with his wife.

Top
#966667 - Mon Feb 11 2013 11:58 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Jazmee27 Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Tue Mar 09 2010
Posts: 634
Loc: Pennsylvania USA
I'm currently wading through Ricky Martin's autobiography, entitled "Me." Initially, I'm ashamed to say I judged the book based on the one song of his I know--which I don't like at all. But once I started reading, I couldn't put it down. It's not boring, or even egocentric: it's a reflective look at the experiences that have shaped his music and acting careers.

Top
#967070 - Tue Feb 12 2013 12:42 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Santana2002 Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Mon Apr 14 2003
Posts: 8340
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: ren33
Your enthusiasm for Zola's "Au Bonheur des Dames" shines through , Toni. I am going to get that next.Did you read it in French?


Yes, I borrowed it from a friend and read it in French. I have to admit that the 'dated' language threw me a bit at first, but it definitely contributes to the charm of the read. I didn't look up every single word that I didn't know, and am even pleased that there were so (relatively speaking) few of them.

I kept getting reminded of the classic descriptive prose encountered in books like 'The Coral Island' and 'The Water Babies' while reading Au Bonheur. I guess the long, charming passages are approached in a similar way.

Edit: I've just checked the dates for all three books, and coincidentally they were all written in the same era, between 1858-62. And guess what? I'm now rereading the Coral Island, which I haven't read since I was a kid! I suppose I'll move on to the Water Babies afterwards, just to please my fancy as reading Au Bonheur has rekindled all the enjoyement the other two brought to me at the time.


Edited by Santana2002 (Tue Feb 12 2013 04:38 PM)
_________________________
It's hard to be perfect when you're human

Top
#967106 - Tue Feb 12 2013 04:52 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: Dagny1]
Santana2002 Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Mon Apr 14 2003
Posts: 8340
Loc: France
Originally Posted By: Dagny1
Originally Posted By: Santana2002
have finally come to the last delicious word on the last delicious page of Zola's "au Bonheur des Dames", and thoroughly enjoyed every page of it.


I also found it an absolutely delightful book! So un-Zola like. It's recommended for anyone who usually passes on Zola's books because they find them too dark.

Per usual, Zola did plenty of research prior to writing Au Bonheur des dames. It's a good primer for the history of the first gigantic department stores. I would have liked to have been a fly on the wall to see Zola shopping for hours with his wife.


It's the first of Zola's works that I have read, and my teenage daughter groaned when she heard me raving about it. She's studying for a literary Baccalauréat, so Zola's work is among the French classics on her reading list, and she finds it too boring, too detailed and too slow for her.

Au Bonheur came across as a detailed yet fun book, which really conveys the social mores, the lifestyle and the restrictions of the era. In parallel to detailing the phenomenal success of the rise of department store, the book offers a wealth of detail about the types of goods that people hankered after at the time, the difference between the classes, the old gentry and all it represents vs the brash youngster making his millions on the back of hard work and vision. There's a real sense of the industrial revolution happening, the slow pace of pre-industrial life yielding reluctantly but inexorably to impulsivity, rapidity, hard-nosed business acumen. There's a blurring of the previously strictly upheld class barriers and taboos. The cold and clinical "hard sell" taking the place of the previously genteel business of the craftsman working with the client to create a unique materpiece.

I found it absolutely fascinating!


Edited by Santana2002 (Wed Feb 13 2013 12:29 AM)
_________________________
It's hard to be perfect when you're human

Top
#967126 - Tue Feb 12 2013 08:48 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: Santana2002]
Dagny1 Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: Sun Nov 14 2010
Posts: 241
Loc: Alabama USA
Originally Posted By: Santana2002
Au Bonheur: It's the first of Zola's works that I have read, and my teenage daughter groaned when she heard me raving about it. She's studying for a literary [/i]Baccalauréat[/i], so Zola's work is among the French classics on her reading list, and she finds it too boring, too detailed and too slow for her.



Which Zola is your daughter's favorite?

L'Assommoir is my favorite. I love the character of Gervaise.

Top
#967129 - Tue Feb 12 2013 09:36 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: Jazmee27]
pyonir Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Sat Apr 25 2009
Posts: 816
Loc: Minnesota USA
Originally Posted By: Jazmee27
I'm currently wading through Ricky Martin's autobiography, entitled "Me." Initially, I'm ashamed to say I judged the book based on the one song of his I know--which I don't like at all. But once I started reading, I couldn't put it down. It's not boring, or even egocentric: it's a reflective look at the experiences that have shaped his music and acting careers.


Interesting. Thanks for the note, I might not pass/dismiss this one should I come across it. I would judge the book based on what little I know about him, but good to know my judgement will probably be wrong.

Top
#967345 - Thu Feb 14 2013 09:45 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Jazmee27 Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Tue Mar 09 2010
Posts: 634
Loc: Pennsylvania USA
Now I've started "The Tiger: A True Story of Vengence and Survival” by John Vaillant, an interesting glimpse into the habitat of the Siberian tiger - and the people who hunt/track them. I'm only on chapter three, but so far I'm really enjoying this. (Yet another book I'd not have read had the library not sent it to me - I figure, once it's here, I might as well try it).

Top
#967348 - Thu Feb 14 2013 10:08 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
ren33 Offline
Moderator

Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 11355
Loc: Fanling
  Hong Kong      
I have finally finished Charles Dickens- A Life, by Claire Tomalin.
She is a good writer, her research is obviously great. He was a wonderful writer, this we know. he worked incredibly hard , mainly to support his 10 + rather useless children.He was generous and kind and supportive to all his close friends and their families. He was a gifted actor and performer. He founded institutions for the poor. he was adored by the public..... I ended up really disliking him!
_________________________
Wandering aimlessly through FT since 1999.

Top
#967656 - Sat Feb 16 2013 05:46 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Jazmee27 Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Tue Mar 09 2010
Posts: 634
Loc: Pennsylvania USA
Last night I started "Forge" by Laurie Halse Anderson, as I found reading in bed sometimes helps me fall asleep. "Forge" is a work of historical fiction that continues the story begun in "Chains." Both books tell the tale of slaves attempting to make better lives for themselves during the Revolutionary War.
In "Chains," one of the characters is branded--and another becomes a prisoner. In "Forge," the former prisoner enlists in the Patriot Army after saving the life of a young soldier. (I have only just started, so I summarized up to the point where I am.)
Very well-written and gripping. I can't wait to finish (each chapter contains a quote or passage from some historical source.)

Top
#967922 - Sun Feb 17 2013 06:22 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Mariamir Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Wed Feb 29 2012
Posts: 4258
Loc: Ontario Canada
For some reason I am never "am reading" a book, always "just finished". Just finished "The Loner" by Ester Wiel and am about to go reread "The Scarlet Pimpernel". smile

And I could go on, but this is my first post here in this forum, not sure of people would care to read my ravings. smile
_________________________
Secret, shall I tell you? Quiz author at FunTrivia am I. Won this job in a raffle I did, think you?

Top
#967923 - Sun Feb 17 2013 06:45 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
agony Offline

Administrator

Registered: Sat Mar 29 2003
Posts: 11734
Loc: Western Canada
I appear to be rereading Dorothy Sayers' Lord Peter Wimsey novels. I really didn't intend this - I was all set to dive into a Christopher Isherwood collection - but who am I to fight it?

Top
#967946 - Mon Feb 18 2013 02:26 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
ren33 Offline
Moderator

Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 11355
Loc: Fanling
  Hong Kong      
Ravings R Us, Mariamir, so rave all you like! Welcome.
_________________________
Wandering aimlessly through FT since 1999.

Top
#968084 - Mon Feb 18 2013 08:34 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Mariamir Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Wed Feb 29 2012
Posts: 4258
Loc: Ontario Canada
Oh, thank you, Ren! smile For my next book, I will either pick up Shakespeare or the novel that my favorite serial was based on: bu bu jing xin, known sometimes as "Scarlet Heart" (dunno why, doesn't mean that).
_________________________
Secret, shall I tell you? Quiz author at FunTrivia am I. Won this job in a raffle I did, think you?

Top
#968135 - Tue Feb 19 2013 10:24 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Jazmee27 Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Tue Mar 09 2010
Posts: 634
Loc: Pennsylvania USA
I'm actually rereading a book that I started last week. It's called "Other Kingdoms" and is by Richard Mathieson. I once read a short storycollection with something by him, so was excited to see how this was.

The story centers around a young man, Alex, although he's actually narrating his story later in life. He has several adventures, which include going off to war, and falling in love--twice. The title refers to those other worlds that touch our own. Very well written, and quite enjoyable (I would warn anyone not to read if they can't stand graphic images of horror--or are offended by explicit descriptions of... well...)

Top
#969001 - Sun Feb 24 2013 05:46 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Jazmee27 Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Tue Mar 09 2010
Posts: 634
Loc: Pennsylvania USA
Just started "The Wolf in the Parlor" by Jon Franklin. It's about a science writer who finds himself intrigued by dogs--and compelled to investigate the bond between humans and their canine companions. Very well-written and informative.

Top
#969003 - Sun Feb 24 2013 06:24 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
pyonir Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Sat Apr 25 2009
Posts: 816
Loc: Minnesota USA
Just finished "My Beloved World" by Sonia Sotomayor. I really liked it. I like her, she's a very intelligent and down to earth woman. I've seen her do a couple of interviews and that got me interested in the book. I was disappointed that she ended the book when she first became a judge, but I understand her reasoning for ending it there. It's a really interesting story of a child of immigrant parents succeeding. For anyone that likes memoir's pick it up.

About halfway through "We Are Anonymous: Inside the Hacker World of LulzSec, Anonymous, and the Global Cyber Insurgency" by Parmy Olson. Not a fan of this book at all. I think Olson just took a bunch of chat logs, news stories, and video clips and compiled them into a book. That doesn't take much investigative reporting, just organizational skills. And the book is extremely basic (which means I'm probably not the target audience). When she explains what "lol" means, I have to balk. I'll finish it, but it really isn't introducing me to an inside story, or anything new.

Top
#969104 - Mon Feb 25 2013 12:08 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
agony Offline

Administrator

Registered: Sat Mar 29 2003
Posts: 11734
Loc: Western Canada
As I said above, I'm re reading Dorothy Sayers' "Lord Peter Wimsey" novels right now. Just finished "The Nine Tailors" - it's really quite a remarkable book. If you like English murder mysteries from the thirties, check this one out - I'd say it is the best of the period. You'll also learn more than anyone could ever want to about change ringing.

Top
#969134 - Mon Feb 25 2013 09:46 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Jazmee27 Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Tue Mar 09 2010
Posts: 634
Loc: Pennsylvania USA
I'm almost finished with "Princess Ben" by Catherine Gilbert Murdock. It's an interesting read, but certainly not one of those books I'd ever read more than once. The story revolves around the reluctant princess, Benevolence, who deeply resents her enforced duties and escapes into a world of magic. She learns, however, the hard lesson that magical ability comes with plenty responsibility of its own--and gradually comes to appreciate her position in society as her home is threatened by an enemy.

Top
Page 9 of 18 < 1 2 ... 7 8 9 10 11 ... 17 18 >

Moderator:  LeoDaVinci, ren33, TabbyTom