Rules
Terms of Use

Topic Options
#99217 - Wed Nov 01 2000 09:11 AM Museums
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
Many of us enjoy going to museums, I know that I always do. Philadelphia Museum of Art and Metropolitan Museum New York are a couple that I got the great pleasure of visiting. What museums would you highly recommend going to?

Top
#99218 - Wed Nov 01 2000 09:36 AM Re: Museums
TemplarLLM Offline
Prolific

Registered: Thu Jun 22 2000
Posts: 1471
Loc: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
OH MY GOD!!!! You mention the Philly Museum of Art (which is outstanding), but didn't mention the Rodin Museum, which is just fleeting moments down the Avenue from the Philly Museum. It's a must, very very moving sculptures....you will love "Eternal Springtime", it is just so sensual.

And then you mention the MET, but don't mention The Frick Collection, again just moments down 5th Ave. It has some of the most well known Hans Holbein The Younger paintings, such as Sir. Thomas More and Sir Thomas Cromwell. It's a treat for sure and such a beautiful and relaxing building.

You should also try the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto and the National and Tate in London. The Tate has the most moving picture I have ever seen, "The Supper at Emmaus" by Carravagio. That is one picture you should learn the history behind. Not only is it an incredible picture, but it also has the most intricate triangular schematics in any picture. Carravagio painted it so that certain figures and objects form a number of perfect triangles.

And who could miss out the Louvre.

Oh, my last one (there are lots, but this one is also great) is the Uffizi Gallery in Florence.

_________________________
The Transplanted Anomaly

Top
#99219 - Wed Nov 01 2000 03:02 PM Re: Museums
CellarDoor Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Sat Feb 12 2000
Posts: 4893
Loc: Seattle<br>  Washington USA...
CHICAGO: The Field Museum (esp. Colleen Moore's dollhouse)

Museum of Science and Industry

WASHINGTON, DC: Air & Space Museum (Wright Brothers' Airplane, US and Soviet nuclear missile casings)

Museum of Natural History (dinosaurs, the Hope Diamond)

Museum of African Art (the sculpture from Benin especially)

Freer Gallery (Whistler's Peacock Room and the Japanese temple demons)

_________________________
Just because there's twilight doesn't mean we can't tell the difference between night and day

Top
#99220 - Wed Nov 08 2000 09:48 AM Re: Museums
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
On this day in 1793, the Louvre Museum opened in Paris.

Top
#99221 - Thu Nov 09 2000 12:41 AM Re: Museums
Cohalen Offline
Prolific

Registered: Fri Dec 10 1999
Posts: 1485
Loc: Tarzana, CA
Did it have "Louvered" windows, JoJo?
_________________________
Inside each and every one of us is our one true authentic swing.
Something we was born with. Something that's ours and ours alone.
Something that can't be learned... something that's got to be remembered. --Bagger Vance

Top
#99222 - Mon Nov 13 2000 12:59 AM Re: Museums
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
The Philadelphia Museum of Art is another fabulous museum to visit.


Top
#99223 - Thu Nov 16 2000 12:48 AM Re: Museums
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
Did you know that there is actually a Dr. Pepper museum in Waco, Texas? The amazing thing is that about 100 people visit the museum every day.

Top
#99224 - Thu Dec 14 2000 12:23 AM Re: Museums
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
The Museum of Modern Art in New York City once displayed a painting by Henri Matisse upside down for almost 7 weeks before anyone noticed. This particular painting was a realistic portrayal of a sailboat, not an abstract image, as you might suspect. They got it wrong because the painting included the boat's reflection in the water and whoever hung it mistook the reflection for the boat.

Source: JUST CURIOUS, JEEVES by Jack Mingo & Erin Barrett


Top
#99225 - Mon Jan 15 2001 07:02 PM Re: Museums
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
On January 15, 1759, the British Museum Opened in London. After the British government purchased three large private collections of manuscripts, antique objects, plants, fossils, minerals, and coins, Parliament passed the British Museum Act for London in 1753. As a result, the British Museum opened on January 15, 1759 in Montague House, in the Bloomsbury neighborhood of London. The world's first public museum, it originally allowed only thirty visitors per day. It is now the largest museum in Britain, with over four million visitors annually. Its treasures include the Rosetta Stone and the Elgin Marbles from the Parthenon.

History of the British Museum: http://people.a2000.nl/sranza/donato/London/museum.htm

Official homepage of the British Museum: http://www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk/


Top
#99226 - Tue Jan 16 2001 08:51 AM Re: Museums
Donnar Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Tue Mar 07 2000
Posts: 621
Loc: Montreal, Canada
I've never met a museum or gallery I didn't like. I loved MOMA in NY and the National Gallery in Ottawa and all the ones I visited in England and Italy. Missed the Louve as I only had 2 days in Paris. Love the Auckland Museum and I'd love to visit the new(ish) one in Wellington.

My absolute favourites are the Smithonium (Sp?) in DC. We were there for 2 weeks and, while Hubby worked, I swooned. For the price of the subway fare into DC I saw wonders of the world for free.

But does anything beat the little town museums off the tourist track? I think not.


Top
#99227 - Sun Mar 18 2001 03:14 PM Re: Museums
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
Bringing this up to get more suggestions.

Top
#99228 - Mon Mar 19 2001 07:44 AM Re: Museums
turquoise Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Tue Dec 19 2000
Posts: 834
Loc: Sydney
NSW Australia

ok, they arent technically museums, but, nothing can outdo them for class.

i reccommend seeing the big pineapple in coffs harbour, nsw.
the big prawn (or shrimp) in ballina , northern nsw.
the dog on a tuckerbox, forgot where this is, is it yass?
(someone amazing like zozo or rocky will be in here with the answer in like 12 seconds.)
and brett whitely's matchstick sculptures.

and harry's cafe de wheels.
now thats culture.

------------------
"the advantage of emotions is that they lead us astray." -oscar wilde


Top
#99229 - Mon Mar 26 2001 12:48 AM Re: Museums
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 

Top
#99230 - Mon Mar 26 2001 06:09 AM Re: Museums
Anonymous
No longer registered


My list of favourites are: -

Imperial war Museum - Duxford Cambridgeshire UK.An ex-RAF base where many British,Australian,American, Canadian and Allied pilots flew from in WWII.They have REAL airplanes stashed everywhere!!
It has a superb American Hangar where all forms of US aviation are displayed.(From a B52 to aF111). This hangar and the displays were all funded from US donations.

National Rail Museum at York, UK.An intriguing look at the history of steam driven locomotives.Absolutely fascinating.

The Tower of London - This is some museum.A link with 1000 years of history!

The War Memorial - Canberra Australia.A fantastic museum relating the strong ANZAC spirit of Australian service personnel through the various theatres of modern warfare.

and Turquoise talk about class......Ain't nothing better than to be in the back bar of the Woolloomooloo Bay Hotel on Anzac Day playing Two-up!!


Top
#99231 - Fri Apr 13 2001 04:46 PM Re: Museums
Astrix Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Wed Jan 05 2000
Posts: 769
Loc: Canada
I'll put in a local plug for the Ontario Science Centre. While maybe not a museum in the traditional sense, it is a great place to take children as the exhibits are interactive. (I couldn't imagine being a child and going through a museum where you can't touch anything.) The way science and technology is explained is great, and we had a fun time when we were there. If you are ever in the Toronto area, I suggest going there with your family.

Ontario Science Centre Website

P.S. - Bit of trivia (seeing as this is FunTrivia) re the Louvre. I always thought the name came from l'oeuvre, French for the work or masterpiece. However, apparently it comes from a Latin word meaning "wolf kennel". The Louvre was originally a fortress before becoming a palace and then a museum. It is possible that the original Louvre was a kennel (lupara or luperia) for housing dogs used in wolf hunts.


Top
#99232 - Wed Apr 18 2001 08:53 PM Re: Museums
Anonymous
No longer registered


Actually, I love going to small towns here in Michigan and checking out the local history museums here. One of my personal favorites was the time I went to the Honalulu House in Marshall MI. Its designed the way homes in Hawaii were built around the turn of the century.


You can rock a cradle, but you can't rock a casbah!


Top
#99233 - Mon Apr 23 2001 06:02 PM Re: Museums
pam wright Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: Sat Mar 10 2001
Posts: 234
Loc: Living in LA LA land
If you ever get to Istanbul--Topkapi Palace is fascinating! The jewels, fine clocks, etc are great, but it's also fun to see the kitchens! They fed thousands of people a day from these stoves. You can even see the Sultan's toilet...white marble, of course!

Just don't use the womens' room! OK? Trust me on this...DON'T!


Top
#99234 - Tue Apr 24 2001 10:31 AM Re: Museums
Anonymous
No longer registered


Say, isn't Istanbul Constantenoble now?


You can rock a cradle, but you can't rock a casbah!


Top
#99235 - Thu Apr 26 2001 02:49 AM Re: Museums
tim10001 Offline
Prolific

Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 1006
Loc: Concord
  California USA   
I really like going to museums, and I've been to a few, well, ok, more than a few. Being from California, I've been to most of the major ones around here, and when I travel I usually try to work one or two into the schedule. Here are the ones around here that are my favorites.

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. I've been here many times, especially when it was on Van Ness Street. It used to be free every first Tuesday evening of the month, and I would make it a point to hit the big shows by well known artists. I've seen exhibitions there focused on Picasso, Stella, Pollack, Rauchenberg, Rothko, Calder, Warhol, and a bunch more that I can't remember right now. Their new building South of Market is really cool but I've only been there a couple of times, and have never seen work by what I would call a "major" artist there, but maybe I haven't been paying close enough attention.

The De Young Museum in Golden Gate Park. Been here many times too, they have a really fine collection of Asian art there, and there are some pretty cool art nouveau murals in the foyer, I hope they save these as they are in the process of ripping the whole building down now and rebuilding it to be earthquake safe. I've seen a lot of shows here but one that stands out in my mind is one of Bierstadt's work of nineteenth century western landscapes. Really huge pieces like 15 x 20 feet but with exquisite detail.

The Getty. I've been to the old one in Malibu and the new travertine one perched above the 405 in Westwood. WHAT an incredible collection, everything from ancient Greece to the
impressionists and just about everything in between. This is without a doubt THE collection on the west coast, and the new complex of buildings are THE best designed and built gallery spaces I have ever seen in my life. See it if you can, if you like art, this is absolute nirvana. I understand they are building a new museum at the old site in Malibu, mainly to permanently house the Greek, Roman, and Egyption antiquities. I can't wait! Here's a little tip for seeing this place, it's free and you don't need any kind of reservation to get in, but if you want to drive there, you have to get a reservation to park your car, and this can take months to get. Leave the car in downtown Westwood in one of the many parking lots there, and ride the municipal bus or your bike to the museum. It's cheap and fast, and seeing the museum is well worth this slight inconvenience.

The Huntington Library and Museum and don't forget those unbelievable botanical gardens, in Pasadena. Where else in the world can you see Gainsborough's "Blue Boy", a Gutenberg Bible, and the world largest, stinkiest flower all on the grounds of a true American palace? Nowhere, mon cheri'!

The Musee Mechanique, at the Cliff House in San Francisco.
This is a funky little museum of late ninteenth and early twentieth century coin operated amusements, like nickelodeons, games and other really cool, really American stuff. I doesn't rate artistically with the other museums on my list, but as far as the fun factor is concerned, it is unequalled in my experience.

The Norton Simon, also in Pasadena. This is a collection of mainly nineteeth century european art, a lot of impressionist, expressionist, and the like pieces here. Renoir is particularly well represented. There is also a collection of Asian art, and some Egyption and Classical Greek stuff here, mainly statuary, but these pale in comparison with the main collection.

William Randolph Hearst's home in San Simeon, popularly known as "Hearst's Castle". You won't find work by many well known "name" artists here, but the collection of antiquities and renaissance and baroque art is impressive. The buidings and grounds here are also spectacular. It was designed and built over the span of about fifty years by Hearst himself and his long-suffering architect Julia Morgan. She must have been one supremely patient woman!

The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. Been here a few times, saw a really impressive display of Jackson Pollack's work here, and Diebenkorn, and Rothko and the 3-D collage guy, what the heck is his name? Oh, well.

These I have seen when I was away from home.

The Louvre. Got there at opening time, 9:00 am I think, and ran directly to the "Mona Lisa" to get a few moments alone with her before the throng arrived. The hype on this is not just hype, that is one incredibly beautiful and mysterious painting. This place is almost too big to see in one day, after a while I found myself walking around, seeing an El Greco here and a Rembrandt there and not being able to really appreciate them because I was in total sensory overload. I'd like to go back and spend some more time here, definately.

The British Museum. This is another one that will boggle your mind. The "Elgin Marbles" are the main draw here and they are astoundinly beautiful, but I think the Greeks are right, the British ought to return them or at least pay some kind of reparation for them, they were stolen from the Parthenon, pure and simple. Around almost every corner here you will find something that will really amaze you, like the Rosetta Stone, the hall of Roman statuary, the Egyptian mummies, the suits of armor and medieval weapons collection, the exhibit of the history of clocks and timekeeping, and on and on. A "must do" while in old London town.

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. All Van Gogh, all the time! If you like this artist (and I do) this is the finest collection of his work in the world. I think it would really
astonish Vincent, if he knew what a fuss we are making over him today.

The Musee Orsay in Paris. This is the finest collection of purely nineteeth century european art I have ever seen. Name an impressionst, they're here, name an expressionist, they're here too, name a famous art-nouveau figure, that's right, here. The venue is a converted train station built around the turn of the twentieth century, powerful and beautiful in and of itself. This place is great!

The Musee Rodin, also in Paris. Rodins old house and grounds. All of his most famous and recognizable work is here, The Thinker, The Gates of Hell, The Burghers of Calais, The Kiss, etc, etc. And quite a few lesser known works and studies for larger works that are just as good as the really famous pieces. There's also a small gallery of paintings in the house that were mainly given to Rodin during his lifetime by his circle of friends who happened to be some of the most influential artists of the late nineteenth century. There is a particularly interesting Van Gogh here that he painted especially for Rodin done in the Japanese style. Really unique.

The Reichsmuseum, in Amsterdam. Rembrandt and of course the other Dutch Masters are featured here. Kind of got rushed through this one, I was on a tour, and they kept us to a strict timetable. I would like to go back someday. This is without a doubt one of the great museums of the world.

The Imperial Palace, in Bangkok, Thailand. The buildings, statuary, and artwork here is stunningly beautiful, abundant, and most of it is covered in pure gold. Really kind of other-worldly, I thought.

The Temple of the Big Buddah, in Nara Japan. (not it's real name, but I don't speak Japanese) This is an ancient temple that just happens to be the largest wooden building in the world and houses the largest religious statue in the world, of Buddah, of course. He's depicted in the traditional seated posture, with one hand raised, palm facing the viewer, and one hand open, palm up. I think the Buddah is about fifty feet high, and cast of solid bronze.

The Palace at Versailles, outside Paris. This is the palace built mainly by Louis XIV in the eighteenth century. The buildings, furnishings, and artwork is opulent and the epitome of regal excess. The gardens here are very beautiful.

Schunbrunn Palace, outside Vienna Austria. This is the palace of Maria Teresa and the Hapsbourg line of Holy Roman Emperors. Built to compete with Versailles in terms of opulence and regal brilliance. Those heating stoves they have in almost every room are unbelievable. The whole place is really grand and everything, but that yellow paint job on the outside has got to go!

The 1876 Philadelpia Exposition museum at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. I've been through most of the other buildings at the Smithsonian, but this is the one that really fascinated me. It's a snapshot of one moment in our history. It's mainly an exhibit of machinery and other manufactured products of the day, and is really a celebration of American optimism and the ingenuity of that time.

The Tower of London. What can I say, the crown jewels, the ravens, the Thames, the Yeoman Warders, the execution sites, the moat, The royal residences, about a thousand interesting stories from it's history, this place has it all.

Well, that's about it for my favorites, be seeing you, Tim.

[ 04-26-2001: Message edited by: tim10001 ]


Top

Moderator:  ren33, SilverMoonsong