Rules: Read Me!
Admin: sue943
Legal / Conditions of Use

Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#99475 - Tue Nov 14 2000 02:01 PM Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
Sometimes during the hustle and bustle of moving we tend to forget one very important thing and that is to order new dog/cat tags for your pets. If your pet is wearing a tag that reflects an address that is 3,000 miles away, it won't much good if they became lost.

While any pet can become lost at any time, a new home is one place that presents a higher degree of risk. After all, sticking around home isn't easy for a pet who is unsure where home is yet.

The best time to protect your pet is before he gets out. ID tags are just one part of the plan. Here are some others.

Check your fences and gates. Are there loose or missing boards or enticing gaps at the baseline that could be opened up with a little digging? Are latches secure, with locks in place? Fix them all. If you have children going in and out all the time, invest in a device that pulls the gate closed automatically.

Check your pets. Don't waste time before getting him an ID tag. Instead of putting your pet's name and your address on the ID tag, use the word "REWARD" and as many phone numbers as you can fit on it. While some people are motivated by altruism, others are moved by the prospect of cold, hard cash. You want your pet back no matter who finds him.

Microchip implants, which carry ID numbers, are also a great idea. Make sure that your pet's permanent ID is registered so if someone discovers it, a fast reunion is possible. The American Kennel Club's Companion Animal Recovery Service can help with microchip matchups in the United States and Canada. And they don't just deal with purebred dogs; any kind of animal can be registered. Call 1-800-252-7894 for more information.

Some pets also carry a tag from a 24-hour tracking service, 1-800-HELP4PETS. In addition to trying to locate me or my backup contacts, the company will authorize emergency veterinary care or boarding if I cannot be immediately found. This is a wonderful service, and although you may never need to call on them, it's great to know they're out there.

Keep current, clear pictures of your pets on hand. You may need them to throw together a flier in an emergency.

If you lose your pet, don't waste any time waiting for him to come home. Put up fliers in the area where your pet went missing and get friends to help you blanket the neighborhood, going door to door. Check the shelters every other day in person. A call won't do, because shelter staff may not recognize your pet or may overlook him. Place a "lost" ad in the newspaper, and check in with every veterinarian in the area, especially those open 24 hours for emergencies.

Finally, don't give up too soon. Pets have been located weeks after their disappearance. Keep running your ad and checking the shelters for at least a month.


Top
#99476 - Tue Nov 14 2000 02:13 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
Linda1 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 11250
Loc: Munchkinland
Has anyone here done the microchip implants? Any complications in doing it? Anything you'd like to share to those of us who have heard about it but haven't actually done it?

How do people know (if they find a lost pet) that there is a microchip inside the animal? I'm not sure I would immediately think about that if I found an animal. Is it just something routine that shelters and vets check for if someone brings in a stray animal?

About how much did it cost you? My vet tends to run a special every once in a while, but what would you say is the "going rate" for having it done?

I'm just curious about this - I've heard a bit about it, but haven't actually done it for Toto. I've been thinking about it, though. Want to make sure it's completely safe first, though.

_________________________
Cats know what we feel. They don't care, but they know.

Top
#99477 - Tue Nov 14 2000 03:10 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
val9000 Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Wed Aug 30 2000
Posts: 2179
Loc: Louisville Kentucky USA
Oh wow! I never even thought about that jj and linda!
Our dog has both standard tags and the chip. (thanks for the reminder, ... I would've forgotten!) While it's fairly easy to get the standard tags changed, what about the chip?


How the chip works: (as best I understood the vet, anyway)
Should a pet become separated from it's owner and picked up by animal control (or taken there by someone who finds the pet), they will scan the pet for a chip (provided there are no conventional tags). The chip contains your name, the pet's name, your address and your phone number. Our Vet charged us $19 dollars, if memory serves.


But what has me wondering as we are nearing a move in the very near future is how does the information on the chip change? Will poor Shelby have to get a second chip implanted? (she showed no signs of discomfort when it was put in). How will they get the old one out? Or is the current one 'reprogrammable'?
I'll call my vet and find out and report back.

[This message has been edited by val9001 (edited 11-14-2000).]

_________________________
Today's subliminal thought is:

Top
#99478 - Tue Nov 14 2000 03:36 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
Linda1 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 11250
Loc: Munchkinland
Val, please do report back on that! Definitely something that we need to be aware of if we move.

_________________________
Cats know what we feel. They don't care, but they know.

Top
#99479 - Sat Nov 18 2000 08:23 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
Sometimes clumping cat litter can get where it shouldn't. Cats with silky, long hair sometimes get litter stuck to their fannies & the insides of their legs, the moisture that catches on their fur from using the box attracts the litter. And then there's tracking: Moisture on a cat's paws can grab litter, which then gets rubbed off throughout the house. Fortunately, you can minimize both problems.

With longhaired cats, if you're not inclined to comb out the spots that attract litter on at least a daily basis, then you should keep the trouble areas clipped short. As for tracking, putting a large sisal doormat under the litter box will help. The rough texture of the mat will help to knock the litter off your cat's paws.


Top
#99480 - Wed Nov 29 2000 02:53 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
Traveling With Your Pets
With the holidays fast approaching, people are already planning their holiday air travel, & for many, that travel will include pets. The American Kennel Club has put together a helpful list of the airlines & their pet policies at www.akc.org/love/dip/legislat/airline_petpolicies.cfm which should help. The information is a great start, but remember you'll still need to check with the airlines directly, because different rules apply depending on weather conditions.

Traveling Without Your Pets
If you're planning to travel without your pets during the holiday season, you'd better hurry up and arrange for pet sitting or boarding. In some cases, you may already be too late. The year end holidays are peak times for boarding kennels & pet sitting services, and openings go quickly. If you can't get a reservation, ask to be informed of a cancellation & start making backup plans. Your veterinarian may offer boarding, or a friend or neighbor may be willing to help out.


Top
#99481 - Fri Dec 01 2000 01:07 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
It is not true that dogs are completely colorblind. While dogs do not have the same color vision as humans, they are able to tell blue from yellow. Like a human with red-green colorblindness, they can't tell the difference between red & green.

The reason for this limited range, in both the colorblind human & the dog, is that there are only 2 kinds of color receptors in the retinas of their eyes. While most humans have 3 kinds of color cells, with 3 different receptor molecules sensitive to blue, greenish-yellow, & red, dogs only have receptors for yellow & greenish-blue.

Canine eyes also lack another human trait: the fovea, an area especially dense with detail-sensing cells. As a result, their detail vision is not as good as ours. But they make up for this by having much better night vision & greater sensitivity to movement.

More about canine vision: http://www.uwsp.edu/psych/dog/dvision.htm http://www.workingdogs.com/vision_coile.htm


Top
#99482 - Thu Dec 14 2000 04:44 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
Clumping litter is one thing you can quit worrying about. No scientific evidence exists that this cat-box filler presents any danger to your pet. The idea that it does traces to an article in a now-defunct cat magazine, in which the author blamed the popular product for the death of a kitten. Warnings have been kicking about the Internet ever since.

To err on the safe side, some veterinarians suggest avoiding clumping litter until a kitten is out of the taste-testing-everything curiosity stage. But even that advice is just a precaution for kittens only, and you don't need to fear any harm if you use clumping litter with adult cats.

If you look at it another way, clumping litter has likely saved the lives of many cats. According to CatWatch, a monthly newsletter put out by the Cornell Feline Health Center, preference polls indicate that cats prefer clumping litter to other varieties. This means that cats who avoid the box if it's filled with another litter type may use a clumping variety without problems. And since a lot of cats who avoid the litter box end up homeless, you could make a case that the introduction of clumping litter has kept more than a few cats in their homes.

Clumping litters are also popular with cat owners, who give clumping litter high marks for ease of use. Drawbacks include tracking problems, because the material that sticks to moisture on cat mess clings just as easily to moisture on cat paws. A mat around the box will help to keep things cleaner. The dustier varieties of these litters can also trigger attacks in asthmatic cats, especially if used with a covered box.

Longhaired cats have another problem with clumping litter: It tends to collect around the genital area and back thighs of the cat. Cats don't swallow what they pull out of their fur. The bigger problem is that an accumulation of clumped litter can lead to a real mess, and potentially a problem in using the box. It's important to keep an eye on your cat's fur in these areas, and help out your cat when necessary with extra grooming or even by keeping the fur trimmed close in problem spots.


Top
#99483 - Fri Jan 12 2001 10:21 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
If you have any tips or questions about your pet or pets in general, please post them here and we will share are knowledge with each other as try to help one another.

Top
#99484 - Thu Feb 01 2001 10:10 AM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
Worried about your pet's weight but not sure if it's really obese? Here's what the pet experts suggest:

  • Start with the rib check. Put your thumbs on the animal's backbone and slide your hands down its body. If you can't feel ribs with a minimum of pressure, you may have a problem. Most breeds should have an hourglass figure when viewed from above.

  • Have your vet check the animal out to make sure no medical conditions are causing weight gain.

  • Eliminate table scraps.

  • If you like to feed your dog or cat healthy treats, that's fine. But adjust the amount of food that goes in the dish accordingly. Much of this is trial and error.

  • Don't free-choice feed (keeping the bowl full at all times and letting your pet decide when and how much it wants to eat). Portion control is important.

  • You can try one of the low-calorie foods, but there are no government regulations as to what constitutes diet pet food. One brand's "light" formula may have more calories than another brand's regular.

  • High-fiber foods provide more bulk so pets feel full even with small portions and may not complain as much when you cut back. Ask your vet or pet store for recommendations.

  • Don't feed multiple pets together unsupervised. One may be stealing another's food.

  • Increase your pet's exercise. It will be good for you both and allow more bonding time.

(C) 2001 The Augusta Chronicle. via Bell&Howell Information and Learning Company


Top
#99485 - Fri Feb 02 2001 10:26 AM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
PET-PROOFING KITCHEN INCLUDES HANGING TOWELS OUT OF SIGHT, Dear Abby

I'm posting this letter as a warning to pet owners.

DEAR ABBY: I am grief-stricken. Yesterday my husband and I faced the awful experience of putting our 3-year-old chocolate Labrador to sleep. For two or three days, he wouldn't eat or drink, and was lethargic and vomiting. We took him to the emergency vet hospital. The vet examined him and found "something" in his abdomen, which would require surgery to remove. What they found in his intestines was part of a kitchen towel.

Unfortunately, the tissue around the towel was infected and dead from the lack of blood supply to his intestines. The damage was worse than anticipated, and he began bleeding internally. He was too weak to make it, and we had to put him to sleep. To say that we're devastated is an understatement.

I always hang a kitchen towel on the handle of the oven on which to dry my hands, remove things from the oven, etc. The towel probably smelled like food, which prompted him to chew it. To top it off, when we came home from the surgery, our 1-year-old puppy threw up the other portion of the towel!

Abby, please make other pet owners aware of this potential hazard. If sharing my story can spare someone else the devastation of losing a pet to something so avoidable, I'll gain some comfort.


Top
#99486 - Thu Feb 15 2001 10:08 AM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
Each year, dogs bite more than 4.7 million people. About 60% of them are children. Nearly a million people seek medical treatment for canine attacks while, on average, 20 people die each year from dog bites. But the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) says it's a problem that can largely be prevented.

To reduce the chance of your dog biting someone:

  • Train your dog
  • Make sure your dog is socialized as a puppy
  • Carefully consider your pet selection
  • Keep your dog healthy
  • Neuter your pet

To reduce the chance of being bitten by a dog:

  • Do not approach strange dogs
  • Don't run past a dog
  • If a dog approaches, stay still
  • If you're threatened by a dog, remain calm
  • If a dog knocks you to the ground, curl up and protect your face and neck
  • Never leave a baby or small child alone with a dog

Web sites: http://www.AVMA.org & http://www.statefarm.com

[This message has been edited by JoJo2 (edited 02-15-2001).]


Top
#99487 - Thu Feb 15 2001 10:36 AM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
Anonymous
No longer registered


To reduce the chance of your dog biting someone:
· Train your dog – WoolDogs are uncontrollable
· Make sure your dog is socialized as a puppy – Wooldogs party at an early age
· Carefully consider your pet selection – WoolDogs consider females only
· Keep your dog healthy – eggs and beer keep WoolDogs coat shinny
· Neuter your pet – No Friggin way man
To reduce the chance of being bitten by a dog:
· Do not approach strange dogs – WoolDogs are not strange, just appear to be
· Don't run past a dog – WoolDogs need attention
· If a dog approaches, stay still – WoolDogs don’t like it if you just lay their
· If you're threatened by a dog, remain calm – Give WoolDogs hugs and beers
· If a dog knocks you to the ground, curl up and protect your face and neck- No comment
· Never leave a baby or small child alone with a dog – Now that’s a cotton picking lie


Top
#99488 - Thu Feb 15 2001 10:54 AM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
WHO LET THE WOOLDOG OUT??!!

WoolDog, now that is the funniest thing I have read in quite awhile. You're just tooo much!


[This message has been edited by JoJo2 (edited 02-15-2001).]


Top
#99489 - Thu Feb 15 2001 01:12 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
Anonymous
No longer registered


Good one WoolDog! Thanks for the laugh!

BTW - Did anyone ever find out about what happens with your dog's microchip if you move? (I don't have a dog with a microchip, or even a dog...just curious )

[This message has been edited by CarolinaCarol (edited 02-15-2001).]


Top
#99490 - Thu Feb 15 2001 03:56 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
When you move, all you need to do is submit a change of address with the veterinarian who implanted the microchip.

Here's some additional information Microchip Identification:

Most people are familiar with the laser scanning of bar codes in supermarkets to identify goods at the check-out line, and bar codes are used by the postal service to automatically identify packages and letters.

This highly efficient electronic identification (EID) system provides essentially the same capability for the identification of companion animals. With this technology in place, and becoming more widely accepted everywhere, fewer lost pets will suffer a tragic ending.

The Technology
EID uses a low-power radio signal to read a 10 digit alpha-numeric ID number stored in a tiny electronic circuit. These low-frequency radio waves can penetrate all solid objects except those made of metal. Therefore, use of electronic ID allows a unique number to be "stored" inside the animal, where it is permanently held in place.

The tiny electronic device used to store the EID number is called a transponder or microchip. This microchip is about the size of an uncooked grain of rice. The microchip is easily injected into the animal by a procedure similar to a routine vaccination. The microchip then remains with the animal for life. Each microchip has a unique code number and owner information for each pet is stored in a central database. Should the pet become lost and scanned by a compatible EID scanning system, the animal can be quickly and safely returned home.

The procedure costs in the neighborhood of $50 to $60. If you haven’t had your pet electronically identified or if you have any concerns or questions regarding the procedure and its cost, please consult with your veterinarian.

Scanners send a signal using a frequency of 125 kHz, much lower than the frequencies used in AM medium-wave broadcasting.

How It Works
The microchip is a passive device. It contains no battery and remains inactive unless being scanned by a compatible reader. The microchip sends the ID number as a radio signal back to the reader, which then decodes the number and displays it on a small screen similar to that on an electronic calculator. Since the microchip contains no battery, there is nothing to wear out.

Inside are only three components. The first is a silicon chip (custom integrated circuit). This silicon chip contains the unique ID number assigned to the micro-chip and all of the electronic circuitry necessary to send the number to the scanner it receives the radio signal.

The second component of the microchip is a coil of copper wire wound around a ferrite (iron) core. This functions as a tiny radio antenna to pick up the signal from the scanner and to send the encoded ID number from the microchip back to the scanner. The third component is a capacitor used for tuning.

The outside of the microchip is a type of glass which has been selected for biocompatibility. This glass is hermetically sealed during manufacturing so it is not possible for any moisture from the host animal’s body fluids to reach the electronics inside.

While glass is biochemically inert, it is also very smooth, which could allow the microchip to move around (migrate) in the animal’s body once injected. To prevent this migration, an antimigratory tip can be employed at one end and special polypropylene sheathing over the glass can provide a surface to which fibrous connective tissue begins to bond within 24 hours of the injection.

In dogs and cats the microchip is injected in a universal site which is subcutaneously between the shoulder blades on the dorsal midline. Each microchip comes pre-packed inside a needle, and this assembly is packaged in a pre-sterilized plastic envelope.

Numerous studies have been performed on a wide variety of species to demonstrate the safety of the microchip. These studies have involved mammals, birds, fish and reptiles which have shown no adverse reactions to the microchip, either biological or behavioral.

Complete Protection
Used in conjunction with traditional identification methods, microchipping provides your lost pet with the best possible chance of being safely returned to you. If a tag is lost or tattoo is missed, you still have the chip. It’s relatively inexpensive insurance. It’s a one-time cost and it is perfectly safe for your pet. Ask your veterinarian for details.

Source: Moorshead Magazine

---------------
"He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true,to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion" -- Unknown

[This message has been edited by JoJo2 (edited 02-15-2001).]


Top
#99491 - Thu Feb 15 2001 04:16 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
anniedt Offline
Prolific

Registered: Mon Oct 02 2000
Posts: 1716
Loc: Splashing around in the puddle...
LOL Doggy. Are you giving us a glimpse into what it would be like to be your owner? Thanks for reminding me of why I have cats. I don't have to share my beer with them.
This might help with questions about microchip implants. www.networkusa.org/fingerprint/page5a/fp-chip-faq.html
_________________________
Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker [i]-Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory</I]

Top
#99492 - Sun Feb 18 2001 08:53 AM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
In cats, obstipation is described as the inability to defecate, a very painful and serious condition that demands prompt veterinary attention. The causes of this backup are not well understood, but they result in intestines that become dilated and unable to push stools out of the body normally.

If your cat is straining or crying out while trying to defecate, or if you notice an absence of feces in the litter box, your pet has a potentially serious problem. Oddly, this blockage may initially appear as diarrhea, because your cat's body, so irritated by the retained feces, may generate lots of watery fluid or mucus to try to cope. This discharge may seem like "ordinary" loose stools when passed.

Any changes in your cat's litter-box habits need to be investigated by your veterinarian, the sooner the better, and obstipation is no exception.


Top
#99493 - Mon Feb 26 2001 05:05 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
Fleas and ticks are not only an annoyance to you and your pet, but can also pose a health hazard. Please share your thoughts and suggetions on how to protect your pet from getting fleas and how to get the problem under control once your pet and your house has been infested by fleas and/or ticks.

Top
#99494 - Tue Feb 27 2001 09:32 AM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
StevieRay Offline
Explorer

Registered: Tue Sep 05 2000
Posts: 71
Loc: NY
I used to have a Springer Spaniel that would get fleas all the time in the summer. He loved to roll around outside so it was inevitable. We were told that we'd have to treat the entire lawn to prevent him from getting fleas. Since I have 3 small kids I didn't think that was an acceptable solution. The only viable solution was to get him groomed and dipped regularly and get pills from the vet. One thing for sure - DO NOT let the dog in the house right after he's treated for fleas. When the fleas start 'moving out' the first place they'll head is the carpet. We made that mistake once - and never again.

Top
#99495 - Sat Mar 03 2001 03:58 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
Oh StevieRay, I used to have a black and white English Springer Spaniel named Sophie, and I adored her. You're right, they love to roll around outside and not letting your dog in the house right after he's treated for fleas is a great tip. I never thought of that before. Another thing with dogs like Springer Spaniels, is that their ears are so close to the ground that many things such as spurs can get caught in their fun and as they scratch sometimes they end up getting lodged up in their ears causing an infection. This happened to Sophie so many times that the doctor suggested operating on her and removing part of her outer ear. I consented and it really helped the poor girl a lot, although she looked hilarious with that cone on her head, but once that was taken off, the infections decreased tremendously.

Top
#99496 - Sat Mar 03 2001 10:13 PM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
clarabell Offline
Participant

Registered: Mon Aug 07 2000
Posts: 39
Loc: Las Vegas, NV
Reading through all the great tips and stories and having a great love for our furry friends, here's one i want to share. My Shih Tzu Miss MooGoo recently became really lack luster, whereas her natural way was to hop and skip around. I also noticed that she was putting on weight, and that her coat was looking funky.
So off we went to the vet and after a battery of tests, the vet discovered she had thyroid problems. The good news was that it is treatable with medicine. So off I trotted home armed with her meds!
Now here comes the tip: Always double check the medicine to see what you have before you give it to your dog. The girl in the vets office handed me meds for a 100lb dog,named Chang. Chang had a bad heart, if I hadn't checked the bottle and I had given our 10lb dog..Well I am sure you all get the picture!!!
Just as an update MooGoo is doing fine and is back to old frisky self. So check out those meds
_________________________
Please visit our website at JimmyVincent.com

Top
#99497 - Mon Mar 05 2001 10:07 AM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
I believe vendome has a Shih Tzu also. They are such beautiful and adorable dogs. clarabell, thank you for the excellent tip. I hope all pet owners read your tip, as it might save the life of their pet one day. Please give Moo Goo a big huga and kiss for me. I miss all the long walks we went on together when I was in Las Vegas.

Shih Tzu: Every dog has a reason for being. Our reason is strictly to give love. We don't hunt, pull, track or attack. We just love to be with you. We might bark to let you know someone is at the door, but we will love them once we know they are your friends. Of course we're intelligent! We love to learn new things. If you want to spoil us and not teach us a thing, we won't mind. If you want to take us to obedience classes, we'll love that, too. We are lively and alert but not in the least high strung. We're really very docile little dogs. If you want to play, terrific! If you want to be left alone, we will sleep. If you work all day and can't be with us, just leave us some toys and we'll amuse ourselves. Oh, yes, we give a lot of love to you and it has to be returned. Don't put us in your yard and leave us to the children. Though we love them, we do require your care. A weekly bath is needed to keep our coats and skin clean. We like a blow-drying so we don't catch cold. Before the bath we need our mats and tangles gently brushed and combed out. We enjoy our faces washed every day, just as you wash yours. If you don't want to keep our long, luxurious coat, you can keep it cut short with a scissor, or you can take us to a groomer to be shaped in the latest style.


Top
#99498 - Tue Mar 27 2001 08:27 AM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
FREE SURGERY FOR KIDS ATTACKED BY DOGS: An international non-profit organization is offering free reconstructive surgery for U.S. children, disfigured by dog bites, who aren't able to pay. Dogs bite nearly five million people every year. More than half the victims are children, most of whom are bitten in the face. Fresh Start Surgical Gifts, based in San Diego, provides treatment for children without financial means who suffer from physical deformities caused by birth defects, accidents, abuse or disease. To date, Fresh Start has performed more than $6 million worth of surgical procedures benefiting children worldwide. "Our goal is to reach those children in need of reconstructive surgery who fall through the cracks of the legal and medical system," says Martin Davis, CEO of Fresh Start. "With the help of reconstructive surgery, these children will be able to lead a life without the embarrassment of disfigurements." For more information, call toll-free at 888-551-1003 or visit http://www.fssg.org

[i]Source: Copyright 2001 by Pulse Direct & United Press International


Top
#99499 - Sat Apr 28 2001 10:20 AM Re: Pet Owners Useful Tips and Chat
JoJo2 Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Nov 19 1999
Posts: 17656
Loc: San Diego California USA 
If you are in the market for a new pet, I suggest checking out your local pet shelters. We have an excellent rabbit shelter here in San Diego and all the rabbits are fixed before you purchase them, which has great chances of increasing their life span. I am going to a rabbit adoption event today to help my girlfriend pick out a new baby and I am bringing the bunnies treats and also to give them some love. If you would like to see some of the adorable bunnies that will be at the event today click here These guys will melt your heart.

For those of you who own a rabbit, please read. Yesterday I had a big scare. Jackie's (my rabbit) urine was orange and it looked like it was blood. I was in a big panic. Thunder found this site for me which really put my heart at ease: http://www.rabbit.org/journal/3-1/red-urine.html I had given Jackie a big salad (carrots and celery) and the veggies containing beta carotene caused the change the change in color. During the day Jackie's urine slowly changed to normal and she's fine. I thought I would share this with my fellow rabbit owners as it might save you a trip to the vet.


Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >

Moderator:  ren33, SilverMoonsong