FunTrivia Book Club - April

Posted by: LeoDaVinci

FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Mar 08 2012 05:16 PM

We will be reading The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco. Feel free to jump in with any thoughts as you are reading, as well as to think about the guided questions if you wish.
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Fri Mar 30 2012 06:06 PM

As LDV will not be around much for this discussion I would like to start off with a question.

Do you think that in creating William of Baskerville the author has drawn on Sherlock Holmes?

What are your early impressions of the monastic community. Is it settled, are there jealousies, cliques, is it overall a happy place?
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Fri Mar 30 2012 06:46 PM

I haven't started reading yet--but I have the book right here on my desk.

When I read the blurb on the back, the name Baskerville jumped right out at me, so I'll be curious to see if there seems to be a Sherlock Holmes connection.
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Mon Apr 02 2012 07:50 PM

I started today and am only still in the very early portion of the book.

It looks like it's a story within a story within a story! I think I have this right, told thirdhand? I like the style though.

Plus it has all these "facts" quoted or referenced and is put forward as a true story. That reminds me of some other modern day writers. Usually by the time I finish the book, I almost believe. But they are set in modern times, so I can't entirely suspend my disbelief. But this one, a mystery set in ancient times, will probably be totally believable to me.
Posted by: Calpurnia09

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Mon Apr 02 2012 10:36 PM

I have to read "Mr Finkler's Question" for my book club here, but then I will be happy to re-read and comment on "The Name of the Rose". Do I just join in or do I have to formally join the group?
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue Apr 03 2012 01:49 AM

Just join in - the more the merrier
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue Apr 03 2012 01:53 AM

I agree Dagny. You can see how this could well have influenced Dan Brown when writing the Da Vinci Code or Angels and Demons, although in the early part of the book I was most struck by the similarities to "The Labryinth". I think the story within the story plot line strikes a chord in a lot of different ways. Of course we're all familiar with that concept from Shakespeare who often did a "play within a play"
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue Apr 03 2012 02:22 PM

Originally Posted By: Calpurnia09
I have to read "Mr Finkler's Question" for my book club here, but then I will be happy to re-read and comment on "The Name of the Rose". Do I just join in or do I have to formally join the group?



Just post whenever you're ready. Glad to have you!

(Edited to fix a typo)
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 05 2012 04:45 PM

As we progress, and the body count rises, I think the monastic community has it's own little petty jealousies, hierarchy that has little to do with monastic hierarchy, but overall is a settled community, or was until these events.
I know William is a senior person, otherwise he wouldn't have been invited to attend the theological convention, but I do wonder why the Abbot has asked him to investigate the murders. Surely, at that time in history, any monastery with this sort of problem would have called in the Inquisition. They were the Church police of the time, they didn't just pursue heretics. Makes me wonder what the Abbot's involvement in the murders actually is.

I am finding the story within the story quite fascinating and can detect even stronger influences on other writers and books the further into this I get.
William reminds me more and more of Sherlock Holmes in his use of logic. Would someone of that period be like this I wonder. I think the blend of historical fact with legend and theology possibly obscures the fact that most people of that period were not well educated, not even all monks could read and write.

Anyway, after all that rambling, at the moment my money is on the Abbot being involved somehow.I don't think he actually did the murders, but maybe they are on his orders. The ones who have died have perhaps come into some knowledge they were not meant to have so they had to be silenced. That's my best guess so far.
Posted by: Mugaboo

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Fri Apr 06 2012 10:54 AM

Originally Posted By: Christinap

I know William is a senior person, otherwise he wouldn't have been invited to attend the theological convention, but I do wonder why the Abbot has asked him to investigate the murders. Surely, at that time in history, any monastery with this sort of problem would have called in the Inquisition. They were the Church police of the time, they didn't just pursue heretics. Makes me wonder what the Abbot's involvement in the murders actually is.


William had already had some experience as an inquisitor, so he would be a good choice, especially after the letter Abbot Abo got from the Abbot of Farfa, which recommended him. Abo didn't want the Inquisition involved, and after the events of the night of the fourth day, I'm not surprised.

Not finished yet, but my money is currently on the librarian. Like of good detective stories, who I think it is, changes all the time laugh
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Fri Apr 06 2012 12:30 PM

Originally Posted By: Mugaboo
Originally Posted By: Christinap

I know William is a senior person, otherwise he wouldn't have been invited to attend the theological convention, but I do wonder why the Abbot has asked him to investigate the murders. Surely, at that time in history, any monastery with this sort of problem would have called in the Inquisition. They were the Church police of the time, they didn't just pursue heretics. Makes me wonder what the Abbot's involvement in the murders actually is.


William had already had some experience as an inquisitor, so he would be a good choice, especially after the letter Abbot Abo got from the Abbot of Farfa, which recommended him. Abo didn't want the Inquisition involved, and after the events of the night of the fourth day, I'm not surprised.




How interesting! I didn't know that about the Inquisition so am learning new things. Thanks to both for the info.
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Fri Apr 06 2012 12:52 PM

I love Adso's description of Brother William in the Prologue and how at first, when shown his "wondrous machines," he thought they were witchcraft.

Then later, when they are nearing the Abbey where the story is set, Adso is further astounded by the incident of the Abbott's missing horse. Brother William's explanation is pure Sherlock Holmes.
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Fri Apr 06 2012 06:02 PM

It is isn't it - you almost expect him to say "elementary my dear Adso".

Can't agree with you on the librarian Mugaboo, well, not unless he is hiding some very rare and possibly heretical manuscript somewhere. I still think the Abbot has more to hide than we realise as yet.
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Sat Apr 07 2012 07:00 AM

Originally Posted By: Christinap
It is isn't it - you almost expect him to say "elementary my dear Adso".



LOL, Chris, I know. Except since Adso is so much younger and more or less his acolyte, William doesn't have to be so gracious. He gives Adso a lecture on paying attention. I laughed when William said he was almost embarrassed blush to tell him what he should have figured out for himself.
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Sun Apr 08 2012 06:13 AM

I don't know if I'm doing this correctly as I've just signed in to the forums so don't really know what to do! Thanks to Christinap for inviting me to join the discussion on The Name of the Rose. I finished it, for I think the fifth time, on Saturday morning. I agree with you regarding the Holmes/Watson relationship and I love how Adso's confidence develops throughout. I discover something new each time I read this novel, either a deeper understanding of the monastic divisions and philosophies, and also *clues* that I had previously not spotted. Even though I knew *how and why* through previous reading, I was still desperate to finish it to find out *how and why*! The power of good writing I suppose.
Posted by: TabbyTom

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Sun Apr 08 2012 06:35 AM

Welcome to the forums and the Book Club, bloodandsand!
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Sun Apr 08 2012 06:49 AM

Thank you
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Sun Apr 08 2012 07:28 AM

Hi, bloodandsand. Welcome! We're so glad you decided to join us. You're doing it just right too.

Wow, you've read The Name of the Rose five times! That's a testimonial for sure. I'm still on my first reading although I've had the book for about twenty years. So many books and all the book groups, it seems I hardly ever get a chance to read anything that isn't voted in somewhere. Sad, lol.

I know what you mean about spotting clues on a reread. There are only a few books that I love enough to reread, but spotting clues and other things that I missed is one thing that makes it more fun and adds to the enjoyment.
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Sun Apr 08 2012 07:55 AM

Hi bloodandsand, glad you decided to come and join the dicussion.
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Sun Apr 08 2012 08:35 AM

Again, thank you.It's nice to be welcomed!
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Mon Apr 09 2012 03:40 PM

Censorship in the Abbey library! Who knew and I wonder if it was really this way at the monasteries back then. I can see that it might have been, at least in some, but now I do wonder what the monks had available to read--or if they were ever allowed to read for pleasure.

I forgot until just now that the mystery is set prior to the invention of the printing press. It's just so unimaginable to me that books had to be copied by hand. But still, in a place where there were books available--in a place where some monks had the actual job of copying books, it's cruel to think of the abbot's attitude:
that they're there "to carry out a precise task" . . . "and not to pursue every foolish curiosity that seizes them" . . .
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Mon Apr 09 2012 04:40 PM

I do think that is the way it was then. Books were rare and valuable things, most would have been on religious subjects and no-one would have wanted to risk being seen with a book that could be considered heretical or otherwise bring them to the attention of the Inquisition. Even though not stated (or at least not so far) in the book I believe that many of the best manuscript illustrators and copiers were in fact illiterate - they copied with no understanding of what they were copying. Even though one of the best ways for a poor family to get a son or two educated was to have them become a monk not all of them got taught to read and write. Copying exactly what you saw could be taught by rote.

I doubt if the monks were ever able to read for pleasure. Their days were too full. They had prayers several times a day, then the copiers copied until there was no more light, others worked on the monastery farm, or in the kitchens, no-one was idle. They went to bed with only a stub of a candle when it got dark, not enough light to read by even if they could or even had the energy to. Unless you were an Abbot or very senior it was quite a hard life.

The books in the Abbey library had been built up over a period of time and would have been too precious for just anyone to be allowed to get hold of them. The position of Librarian was very important, a very trusted member of the community, with great responsibility. The books would have been mainly available for senior churchmen or scholars to study, not the Abbey community itself.
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue Apr 10 2012 08:19 AM

With regard to this abbey, I don't think the monks would be encouraged to read for pleasure even if they had the time or the requisite understanding. From the various discourses it would seem that the purpose of reading/studying was for the greater good and praise of god rather than personal pleasure or enjoyment.

I was surprised at the number of monks who came to the abbey to simply copy a book to take back to their own abbey, nothing like today where we can simply borrow the text and then return it to our local library. I think it's only when you read something like this that you appreciate what an incredible invention the printing press actually was!
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue Apr 10 2012 08:20 AM

Thanks for all the info, Chris.

shocked I've definitely been reading too much Brother Cadfael.
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue Apr 10 2012 08:24 AM

Originally Posted By: bloodandsand
I was surprised at the number of monks who came to the abbey to simply copy a book to take back to their own abbey, nothing like today where we can simply borrow the text and then return it to our local library. I think it's only when you read something like this that you appreciate what an incredible invention the printing press actually was!



I know. Can you imagine! We're very spoiled today. We know we live better than people in the past; I heard that we live better now than even the kings did a hundred years ago.
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue Apr 10 2012 04:51 PM

Until you read a pretty accurate historical novel it is quite easy to underestimate the power of the printing press. As bloodandsands has said, many monks would come to an Abbey just to copy a book for their own Abbey. A local church would only have had a Bible if someone had copied it and given it to them. No ordinary household would have had a book of any type, and wouldn't have been able to read one even if they had access to it. That's why the church had so much power at this time. As is clear from The Name of The Rose they controlled knowledge. The old saying of knowledge is power was well and truly understood by the Church hierarchy. If something conflicted with etablished doctrine it was supressed.
Posted by: Calpurnia09

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Wed Apr 11 2012 10:09 PM

I've just finished Mr Finkler's Question, which was very good, and have started The Name of the Rose. In reading the forward or preface, I was surprised to find out how many times a day the monks prayed, but then, of course, they saw their purpose in life as to praise and serve god. When the Benedictine monastery at Melk was mentioned I was quite excited as I there in 2010 and saw the magnificent library. I was disappointed that the story would not be set there, but in an unknown place. It is the young monk who is from Melk, which is now in Austria.

As I read more, I'll put in my thoughts.

Hi Bev, nice to catch up with you again. smilee
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 12 2012 01:44 AM

Laughter and comedy. Is it heretical, is it in line with church doctrine. A very interesting thought. The Bible tells us to praise God joyfully, but does joyfully in this context mean what we take it to mean these days.
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 12 2012 09:44 AM

I have to be careful here because of *spoilers*, as I have read the novel before, but you are right, Christinap, in terms of what joyfully means to the brothers of the Abbey. The differences between the orders, Benedictine, Franciscan, Dominican etc and their various offshoots, are brought out in great detail. I found this novel not only a wonderful *read* but a wonderful learning experience.

Hi Ann, thanks for the greeting!

Bev
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 12 2012 10:51 AM

I'm trying to be careful because of *spoilers" as well. I think these days we have lost sight of the differences that there were between the various orders.
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 12 2012 11:56 AM

Too true, Christinap. I think that's why I enjoy this novel so much, I learn each time and it's learning through enjoyment/interest and not because I have to!
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 12 2012 01:59 PM

Originally Posted By: Calpurnia09
I've just finished Mr Finkler's Question, which was very good, and have started The Name of the Rose. In reading the forward or preface, I was surprised to find out how many times a day the monks prayed, but then, of course, they saw their purpose in life as to praise and serve god. When the Benedictine monastery at Melk was mentioned I was quite excited as I there in 2010 and saw the magnificent library. I was disappointed that the story would not be set there, but in an unknown place. It is the young monk who is from Melk, which is now in Austria.

As I read more, I'll put in my thoughts.




I'm not too far in the book either but like you am learning an immense amount about monasteries and life back then. Plus getting some great information from Chris and Bev.
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 12 2012 04:35 PM

The great religious debate of the time centred on poverty. Mendicant orders, such as the Dominicans and Francicans, held to a life of poverty. They relied on charity from the general population, and did not believe in owning property, either individually or communaly. The monastic orders on the other hand, such as the Benedictines, held great estates, rich churches and were often extremely wealthy. Many Abbots of these great monasteries had enormous wealth in their control. In the period in which the book is set various schisms were arising even within orders themselves centering around whether or not the Church should abandon all wealth.
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 12 2012 06:40 PM

How that chimes with Puritanism and Roman Catholicism in later years! (Is chimes the right word here, I've had a couple of glasses of the red stuff!)
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 12 2012 07:25 PM

Originally Posted By: bloodandsand
How that chimes with Puritanism and Roman Catholicism in later years! (Is chimes the right word here, I've had a couple of glasses of the red stuff!)



Oh, oh. Been into the sacrificial wine? wink
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Fri Apr 13 2012 01:44 AM

Chimes is a good word for it. Yes it does doesn't it
Posted by: Calpurnia09

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Sat Apr 14 2012 08:41 AM

The fantaticism of the Church seems to translate into violence against any who oppose the current power holders' views of what is correct dogma. We don't see priests or laypeople burnt today as the secular powers wouldn't allow it. Then I thought that some extremist Muslims think that it is holy to kill those that they see as the enemy of their faith.

Ubertino is an unexpected friend of Brother William. His invoking of sexual imagery to describe what he disapproves of is disconcerting. Talking about the young man whose death is what William is asked to investigate he says, "There was something ... feminine, and therefore diabolical about that young man who is dead. He had the eyes of a maiden seeking commerce with an incubus."

It makes me wonder how much the Church has progressed when homosexuality and contraception are still regarded as sins.

Another point I wondered about was that in the book John XXII was regarded as a bad pope. If this is so I wonder why John XXIII chose that name when he is considered to have been a pope that tried to modernise and humanise doctrines and the liturgy. He was the one who allowed services to be said in the vernacular, rather than Latin.

I am finding the intricacies of the politics both religious and secular very interesting.
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Sat Apr 14 2012 09:27 AM

Totally agree, Ann. We start to see the separation of church and state and the problems, especially for the religious orders, that this entailed.
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 19 2012 01:14 PM

After about a week of no time to read, I finally managed to get back the The Name of the Rose.

I loved the part where William and Adso sneak into the library at night. It gave me quite a chuckle when William told Adso to "linger in the kitchen at dinner hour" and get a lantern for them to use. Adso: "A theft?" William: "A loan, to the greater glory of the Lord." Adso: "If that is so, then count on me."

I did have a moment of trepidation about William, who is supposed to be a mentor to Adso, leading him astray by breaking a rule of the monastery. Was he wrong to enlist Adso's aid? Is he sending him a signal that it's ok to break the rules?

Dagny
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 19 2012 02:47 PM

I don't think he's wrong, Dagny. He has been asked to help solve the murders and to go into the library is the only way William feels he can make some headway in doing this. I think the way he's looking at is very much that the *borrowing* of a lamp as a sin pales into insignificance when weighed against several murders. I think if I were Adso, I'd tend to agree with him!
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 19 2012 04:02 PM

It is also in part a commentary on the theological thinking of the time. "To the greater glory of the Lord" excused a lot of sins in that era.

I find the development of Adso interesting. He is less naive, less unwordly, than when his journey with William started. He has been exposed to "evil" in a way he hasn't been before and it has changed him.
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 19 2012 05:42 PM

Originally Posted By: bloodandsand
I think the way he's looking at is very much that the *borrowing* of a lamp as a sin pales into insignificance when weighed against several murders. I think if I were Adso, I'd tend to agree with him!


LOL, for sure.

I loved that entire bit with the library and the labyrinth, especially the encounter with the mirror.
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 19 2012 05:44 PM

Originally Posted By: Christinap
It is also in part a commentary on the theological thinking of the time. "To the greater glory of the Lord" excused a lot of sins in that era.



It certainly set Adso's mind at ease. I hadn't thought of it as being a commentary; thank you for pointing that out.
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Fri Apr 20 2012 11:05 AM

I agree with Christinap's point about the development of Adso. He matures (in more ways than one)throughout the novel and gains in confidence, yet still maintains an almost childlike naivety in some aspects of his understanding.
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Fri Apr 20 2012 03:41 PM

I'm not sure how much exposure to the outside world, other monasteries etc. someone in his position would normally have had at the time. A lot of the monks entered the monastery at a very young age, and, depending on the order, never set foot outside it again. A lot of them were very self contained communities, and if any contact with the world outside the walls was needed it was done by senior, older members of the ocmmunity who would not be "tempted" by distractions. Our Adso is getting an education denied to most monks of the time.
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue Apr 24 2012 07:26 AM

Can't say much without spoiling it for people who haven't finished the book yet. What I can say though is that ths is a fascinating multi-layered book that bears reading more than once (as I think bloodandsands will testify to). I also think it is interesting that overall we have tended to focus on the historical accounts of monastery life, the religious influences of the day etc. rather than on the murders and who-dun-it. I think that shows how very thought provoking a lot of the descriptive writing is.
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue Apr 24 2012 05:56 PM

Originally Posted By: Christinap
I also think it is interesting that overall we have tended to focus on the historical accounts of monastery life, the religious influences of the day etc. rather than on the murders and who-dun-it. I think that shows how very thought provoking a lot of the descriptive writing is.



Yes, Chris, it is interesting the way our conversation has gone so far. There's all these little details that catch my interest. And thanks to some of the great posts here, I'm learning a lot.
Posted by: Calpurnia09

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Wed Apr 25 2012 01:01 AM

I am just up to where they are about to go into the library. I agree that, like others, I have focused on the religious and political background of the story rather than the murders. I have gone to wiki to look the background and learnt a lot. I hadn't known why there were two popes and had assumed that the one in Avignon was the false one. Fascinating stuff for one who loves European history.

The writing is brilliant in creating atmosphere and the sense of the superstitious dread in which medieval people lived. One criticism, I wish that there were translations, as a footnote, of those sections written in Latin. I find it unfriendly of writers to make part of their work inaccessible to general readers when a book is not published for a specialised group. It is easy now to get a translation through google, but it was not so at the time the book was written.
Posted by: Calpurnia09

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 26 2012 01:34 AM

Eco presents some theories about power through the voices of his characters. When Salvatore is asked by Adso why he killed Jews he replied that it was because he was told that they had all the wealth. When Adso pointed out that the lords and the bishops also had great wealth and that they were the true enemies of the poor Salvatore said that when your true enemies are too strong you must choose weaker ones.

In his discussion with Adso about heresy William points out that because of the structure of religious power Francis could never make the outsiders a part of the community.

I was fascinated by the fact that the monks were not supposed to read the manuscripts that they were copying. If they became curious it degraded the sanctity their work. Was this a belief because Adam and Eve were supposed to have eaten the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge? The powerful in the Catholic Church were opposed to science as God was the explanation for all things.
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Thu Apr 26 2012 10:17 AM

I think that's certainly a part of it, Ann, but I also feel that power, for the church, was almost an end in itself. The church wanted to maintain its power over the populace and the control of knowledge and/or learning was vital in helping the church achieve this aim.
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Sat Apr 28 2012 04:04 PM

It's really exciting! I have about 150 pages to go and haven't a clue.
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Sun Apr 29 2012 06:10 PM

Poison by contact: It appears that some of the victims are thought to have been poisoned by contact--through the skin, possibly from handling a certain book. This reminded me of something I read long ago about the Borgias and what masters of poison they were. Not sure if this is fiction or not, but I read of the inside of new gloves being poisoned so that the wearer would die at some point unrelated to their enemy.
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Mon Apr 30 2012 07:23 AM

Clever isn't it. Theoretically I think poison by contact is possible. If you think about the number of people who used to die because their wig powder, face powder etc. contained arsenic because it whitened the skin it must be possible to poison someone by having them handle something soaked in poison. I don't know how soon the poison would loose potency though. I suppose it would depend on the material it was applied to, rate of absorbency, potency of the poison itself.

I've read the same thing about the Borgias. One of them used to take a daily very small dose of arsenic to protect himself against being poisoned.
Posted by: Calpurnia09

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Mon Apr 30 2012 07:47 AM

Yes, I agree. There was a continual battle between the Church and the secular authorities for domination. Each had its own weapons.
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Mon Apr 30 2012 11:42 AM

I think that it was more by ingesting the poison. Apparently the stolen poison was smeared onto the pages of the book and then, as the monks licked their fingers to separate the pages,they ingested it, which explained their blackened tongues and fingers.
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Mon Apr 30 2012 03:44 PM

Originally Posted By: bloodandsand
I think that it was more by ingesting the poison. Apparently the stolen poison was smeared onto the pages of the book and then, as the monks licked their fingers to separate the pages,they ingested it, which explained their blackened tongues and fingers.



I think you're right, Bev. As I read on, that seems to be William's thoughts in the final conversation in the library. Previously I had thought the blackened tongue was just a result of the poison in the body and not necessarily that the poison had entered the mouth.
Posted by: Calpurnia09

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue May 01 2012 06:57 AM

I did not do well at identifying the murderer. My suspects kept getting killed off. I have a few more pages to read but I know the whole plot now.
Posted by: LeoDaVinci

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue May 01 2012 02:11 PM

I'll leave this open for a few days more, but, have opened the Treasure Island thread as well. I loved following the discussion here, and hope to see many more.
Posted by: Christinap

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue May 01 2012 06:02 PM

I was the same Dagny. I thought the black tongues were due to the fact they had been poisoned, not through actual ingestion of poison. I agree with Ann as well, my suspects kept getting killed off. Mark of a good mystery novel that though, not being able to guess early on.
Posted by: Dagny1

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Tue May 01 2012 10:20 PM

Originally Posted By: Calpurnia09
I did not do well at identifying the murderer. My suspects kept getting killed off. I have a few more pages to read but I know the whole plot now.



You and me both! Another death reported and here's me shocked saying, well, it wasn't him. I was totally blindsided.
Posted by: bloodandsand

Re: FunTrivia Book Club - April - Wed May 02 2012 12:21 PM

That's what I love about this novel, you can read it on some many levels and it doesn't disappoint on any of them.