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#1122267 - Sun Jan 10 2016 02:44 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
guitargoddess Offline
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I have finally started Go Set a Watchman and liking it so far. Very sad that one character I was expecting won't be in it frown at least not 'live'
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#1122875 - Fri Jan 15 2016 11:52 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Copago Offline
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We watched the movie "A Walk in the Woods" yesterday so (for the first time in a long time) I picked up a book and started reading A Walk in the Woods. smile

I tend to listen to audio books these days ... not long finished Bill Bryson's latest one "The Road to little Dribbling". Funny funny man. laugh

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#1123129 - Mon Jan 18 2016 12:59 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
flopsymopsy Offline
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I think that Antonia Fraser's early stuff is better - I remember reading Cromwell, Our Chief of Men and Mary Queen of Scots and being unable to put either of them down. But her semi-autobiographical/modern stuff isn't all that wonderful.
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#1130765 - Tue Mar 22 2016 10:29 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
agony Offline

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"Dear Maeve" a collection of newspaper columns from Maeve Binchy.

I'm having quite a bit of fun with this.

I've always liked Maeve Binchy, even though her novels, never all that substantial, got positively feather-light toward the end of her life. The stories were predictable and silly, but her voice was always fun and entertaining.

And here, all we've got is her voice, blethering on about one thing and another. Sometimes I agree with what she had to say, sometimes I disagree, but I like the way she said it.

One section is made up of columns about internal Irish things, and is not very interesting to the rest of us, though a piece from the mid 90s about how the Queen Mother should take over the monarchy, and then let the whole thing go with a bang on her death, is fun.

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#1131523 - Thu Mar 31 2016 04:25 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
HairyBear Offline
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I read Mary Queen of Scots back in college. While the subject matter was not to my taste, I thought Antonia Fraser's writing was quite good.

I'm almost done with another anthology, this one a collection of short stories about horse racing selected by Dick Francis. Mostly forgettable, but entertaining nonetheless.

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#1131866 - Mon Apr 04 2016 07:49 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
C30 Offline
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Loc: Lancashire England UK         
The only two "Discworld" novels by the late Terry Pratchett that I have not hitherto read, "I Shall Wear Midnight" and "The Shepherd's Crown". The latter being his final book.

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#1134276 - Sat Apr 30 2016 05:25 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
ren33 Offline
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I am really quite enjoying, and never expected to: Robert Galbraith, The Cuckoo's Calling. A nice clever whodunnit.
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#1134629 - Tue May 03 2016 10:25 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Santana2002 Offline
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Re-reading Jane Eyre, another of my favourite childhood classics, and loving every page!
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#1134952 - Fri May 06 2016 12:14 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
flopsymopsy Offline
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If you like police procedurals aka crime fiction with a lot of painstaking detective work and not a lot of whizzbang car chases, you might like a series by Graham Hurley. The books are set in Portsmouth, an historical naval port on the south coast of England. Pompey (as many Brits call it) has always had a dark side and that's very much reflected in the books, which barely mention the Navy but concern themselves with an underbelly of civilian crime - drugs, protection rackets, violence, and policemen who aren't all perfect all of the time.

Detective Inspector Joe Faraday is the main protagonist, ably (but not always honorably) assisted (and sometimes impeded) by Det Constable Winter. The first novel, Turnstone, starts slowly and takes several chapters to get to the action but later books in the series are a bit faster - probably because they assume you know the grimy background already so it is worth reading them in order.
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#1134973 - Fri May 06 2016 01:13 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
ren33 Offline
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Sounds just me. Thanks
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#1135500 - Thu May 12 2016 06:25 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
ren33 Offline
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I did like the Robert Galbraith, clever and tense, so I got the next one from the library. looks just as good.(Called The Silkworm)
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#1136689 - Thu May 26 2016 09:22 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
ren33 Offline
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That did not disappoint either. Clever, original, I did guess the "perp" in this one but there were times when I thought I was wrong. What is so great is that the lady can write so well in her original genre and now is my hero again in crime. I am about to start the third one in the Strike series. It looks like quite a gruesome beginning....
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#1137686 - Thu Jun 09 2016 08:15 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
agony Offline

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Just thought I'd mention this here, because some of you might be interested.....

Just went to see the movie "Love and Friendship", which is based on Jane Austen's "Lady Susan". It's been ages since I read that, so don't know how well it follows the plot, but it's the first Austen movie I've seen in some time that focuses more on the wit and satire, and less on the romance. I've always felt that the movies that have us falling in love with Mr Darcy kinda miss the point, a bit.

So, definitely worth a look if you are an Austen fan - it's very funny.

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#1137712 - Fri Jun 10 2016 01:22 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
ren33 Offline
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Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
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OOoh great , I will!
I agree Really Mr Darcy is a nasty piece of work. I love the characters she portrays that are funny and witty .
Love Mr Bennet and Mr Collins best.
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#1141842 - Sat Aug 06 2016 05:50 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
ren33 Offline
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Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 12061
Loc: Fanling
  Hong Kong      
I still read about 3 books a week and have really enjoyed some lately:
1.The three autobiographies of Paul O'Grady, which I am sure many Brits will love.
2 Having really loved Edith Wharton, I realised I had never read " The Children,"
It is the first book for ages that I have been moved by at the ending.
She writes with such deep feeling and class.


Edited by ren33 (Sat Aug 06 2016 05:51 PM)
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#1143085 - Tue Aug 23 2016 03:07 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
LeoDaVinci Offline
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I just finished the entire Saxon Series written by Bernard Cornwell (nine books currently with a tenth coming soon). I enjoyed them greatly and liked how Cornwell can relay actual history in a fictionalized way. His detail, especially in battle scenes, is excellent.


Edited by LeoDaVinci (Tue Aug 23 2016 03:07 PM)
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#1143375 - Fri Aug 26 2016 08:40 PM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
ren33 Offline
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Leo , thats a series I have on my to do list I always meant to read them . Now I will. Thanks
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#1143595 - Tue Aug 30 2016 11:35 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Santana2002 Offline
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Registered: Mon Apr 14 2003
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Loc: France
Just finished "Anne of Green Gables", which I never read as a child and felt I should, simply to know why it was loved by so many. A real feel-good children's novel, on the style of Polyanna, Little Lord Fauntleroy, The Little Princess and such like.

I switched immediately to "Dubliners" by James Joyce, a great period read, and not a little nostalgic for me. There's a wealth of description in this novel, both of the people and the places, and it was a real trip down my hometown memory-lane. From the perspective of a variety of characters, rich and poor, young and old, from all walks of life, the author paints a comprehensive picture of life in Dublin in the early 1900's. I loved it!

Leo, your series looks interesting, I suspect I'll be ordering the first from Amazon any day now!



Edited by Santana2002 (Tue Aug 30 2016 11:35 AM)
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#1143646 - Wed Aug 31 2016 01:05 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
ren33 Offline
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Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
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I loved Dubliners, much more than Ulysses.

For Nostalgic childhood favourites mine is the Little White Horse by Elisabeth Goudge I love it, nearly as much as the Wind in the Willows. (edited twice because I couldn't spell basic words.)


Edited by ren33 (Wed Aug 31 2016 01:07 AM)
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#1143682 - Wed Aug 31 2016 11:17 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Santana2002 Offline
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Registered: Mon Apr 14 2003
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My spelling goes out the window when I'm enthusiastic about my subject ... My fingers don't seem able to keep up with the speed of my thinking!
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#1145898 - Wed Sep 28 2016 05:39 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
Santana2002 Offline
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So I'm having a bit of a "Highland Fling" with my reading at the moment. I was a childhood fan of Lilian Beckweth's stories of life on a remote Hebridean island in the 40s or 50s and when I came across one of my old books recently and it started me off. I reread those on my shelf then hopped on to Amazon to order others that I never got around to reading, and have been nose-deep in them all for the last couple of weeks.

Ms Beckweth draws on her own experiences as an Englishwoman living amongst the crofters of the Hebrides, and the characters she met during her extended stay there. She relates many funny anecdotes that had me chuckling along as I read through the pages.

Her books are sensitively written, gentle stories about the life of a crofter or North Sea fisherman shortly after WWII. They are all filled with abundant, glorious descriptive passages which paint a (somewhat rose-tinted and nostalgic) image of the nature and wildlife of the Scottish Isles, not to mention painting great caricatures of the local people and their oftentimes eccentric behaviour.

My favourites are definitely "The Spuddy" (a stray dog befriended by a lonely child, who eventually finds mutual respect and a loving home with a lonely local fisherman) and "A Shine of Rainbows" (a crofting couple adopt a short-sighted boy. The husband finds it hard to take to the lad, but their mutual love for his wife eventually brings them together). Both of these have a depth of emotion in them as tragic as it is endearing. Lump-to-the-throat sort of reading.
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#1150806 - Mon Nov 14 2016 08:15 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: Santana2002]
skunkee Offline
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Registered: Thu Oct 16 2003
Posts: 9956
Loc: Burlington Ontario Canada  
Natchez Burning - Greg Isles. I forgot how well he can write.
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#1150895 - Tue Nov 15 2016 01:16 AM Re: What are you Reading mark2 [Re: ren33]
ren33 Offline
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  Hong Kong      
An Officer and a Spy Robert Harris.Wow! I am so enjoying this. Superbly researched and most dramatic and clever. I am wondering what else he has written that I would like?
I looked up the bibliography and couldn't tell. However, the one about Europe after Hitler won WW2 doesnt sound like my thing at all. Any recommendations> ? Please?
Oops, I forgot . It is a fictionalised version of the Alfred Dreyfus Affair.


Edited by ren33 (Tue Nov 15 2016 01:20 AM)
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