Rules
Terms of Use

Page 2 of 6 < 1 2 3 4 5 6 >
Topic Options
#286246 - Sat Nov 26 2005 02:15 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
TabbyTom Offline
Moderator

Registered: Wed Oct 17 2001
Posts: 8449
Loc: Hastings Sussex England UK    
Quote:

How much snow does it take to strand cars there? I'm just curious.



According to the Daily Telegraph, there was “up to five inches” of snow on Bodmin Moor (about 12 or 13 cm).

Admittedly, I’d only trust the Telegraph a hundred per cent if it was reporting on Miss Elizabeth Hurley’s wardrobe, but I dare say it’s accurate enough.
_________________________
Dilige et quod vis fac

Top
#286247 - Sat Nov 26 2005 05:22 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
NalaMarie Offline
Mainstay

Registered: Tue Jun 06 2000
Posts: 688
Loc: Missouri USA
We haven't gotten anything here in the midwest...yet. They are calling for a few snow showers Tuesday, but until then, we will be experiencing 60+ degrees weather and thunderstorms.

Top
#286248 - Sat Nov 26 2005 08:32 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
skunkee Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Thu Oct 16 2003
Posts: 10578
Loc: Burlington Ontario Canada  
Surprise, surprise - we had a couple of inches fall overnight.
It was supposed to be finished with by now, with warmer weather and rain on the way. My hubby was going to put up the outdoor lights today, but maybe not now!
_________________________
Editor: Movies/Celebrities/Crosswords

"To insult someone we call him 'bestial'. For deliberate cruelty and nature, 'human' might be the greater insult." - Isaac Asimov

Top
#286249 - Sat Nov 26 2005 09:06 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
ktstew Offline
Forum Champion

Registered: Tue Jan 18 2005
Posts: 8717
Loc: Arkansas USA
Here in NW Arkansas, we continue to drive even if there are 6 or 8 inches, because the highway department pretty much stays on top of things,- snowplows and road chemicals. We get a fraction of the snow they got here 40 years ago...school would be out for weeks, sometimes.

However, about 400 miles west of here, where DG Dave lives [ and where I'm originally from] all it takes is half an inch of snow and suddenly there are 10 car pile ups all over the place. People in central Texas get so little snow that they have no idea of how to drive on it [ coupled with the fact that people drive WAY too fast there, regardless of the weather]

Every winter, it's a disaster waiting to happen.
_________________________
A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is just putting on its shoes - Mark Twain

Top
#286250 - Sat Nov 26 2005 09:11 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
agony Online   content

Administrator

Registered: Sat Mar 29 2003
Posts: 14973
Loc: Western Canada
PF is right, the West Coast kinda falls apart when it snows. Some of it has to do with the way things are constructed - in the snowier parts of the country, we don't build steep driveways, for instance.
The question of how much snow it takes in order for cars to be stranded tends to vary, here, with the time of year. In the fall, a snowfall of three to four inches in a few hours would have cars in the ditch, but by February, that wouldn't bother us at all - we'd be used to winter driving.

Top
#286251 - Sat Nov 26 2005 09:36 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
skunkee Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Thu Oct 16 2003
Posts: 10578
Loc: Burlington Ontario Canada  
You know agony, it has always amazed me how people can forget how to winter drive from one year to the next...especially in ares that get regular snowfall (like here).
We get varying amounts of snow every year, and the length of time it spends on the ground before a warm spell melts it is definitely shorter than it used to be, but it does snow every single winter, and much more often than once.
It's someething that I've never understood!
_________________________
Editor: Movies/Celebrities/Crosswords

"To insult someone we call him 'bestial'. For deliberate cruelty and nature, 'human' might be the greater insult." - Isaac Asimov

Top
#286252 - Sat Nov 26 2005 10:08 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
lothruin Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Wed Nov 12 2003
Posts: 2165
Loc: Nebraska USA
Up to five inches at a first snowfall could be pretty dangerous. We've gotten 13 inches at a first snowfall, and people were still out driving. (Well, half the city had their power out, so those who were driving were either going away from their powerless houses to friends and family or they were friends and family going to pick up those with power out...) I know we had a couple of snowstorms last year that stranded motorists but if I recall it wasn't from number of inches on the ground, but the windspeed blowing snow across the highways. People pulled over and waited for someone to come to them because they simply couldn't see what was in front of them, not because they couldn't drive on what was under them.

Like those of you farther north (who probably have to deal with MUCH more snow than I do, although Nebraska is no peach in winter), I'm always surprised by the number of accidents at the first couple of snowfalls. Last year we had 24" of snow on the ground at one point. This had been the result of two major snowstorms and one minor one in between which it hadn't thawed at all. People were still out driving, going to work, even going to school. (School was only called off during the actual snowfalls.) And there were relatively few accidents, and nothing major. But earlier in the season, when the first 2" hit the ground, you'd think we lived in California. It was like noone had ever seen snow before.

PS: NalaMarie, none here in the Midwest yet, huh? Nebraska doesn't count?


Edited by Lothruin (Sat Nov 26 2005 10:12 AM)
_________________________
Goodbye Ruth & Betty, my beautiful grandmothers.
Betty Kuzara 1921 - April 5, 2008
Ruth Kellison 1925 - Dec 27, 2007

Top
#286253 - Sat Nov 26 2005 11:14 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
agony Online   content

Administrator

Registered: Sat Mar 29 2003
Posts: 14973
Loc: Western Canada
Actually, we don't get that much snow here (I'm in east central Alberta) - skunkee probably gets more, where she is. The problem with our snow is - it stays. The snow from the first major snowstorm is usually still on the ground next March - we don't get the snow, thaw, snow again cycle.
I'm always interested to hear about 'snow days' when the schools are closed. How does that work? What do parents do for alternate child care? What if someone doesn't hear about schools being closed and sends their kids anyway? It seems to me, these days when in most families with school age chldren both parents work, there would be more kids on the road, being ferried to babysitters, arranged at the last minute, parents harried and late for word at having to figure all this out - anyway, wouldn't it be MORE dangerous, rather than less? What is the rationale for closing schools?

Top
#286254 - Sat Nov 26 2005 12:57 PM Re: Aaaaagh!
skunkee Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Thu Oct 16 2003
Posts: 10578
Loc: Burlington Ontario Canada  
I almost wish the snow would stay on the ground all winter. Then you'd only have to go through that wet, messy thaw once a year, and not 15 or 20 times. When you have to keep wiping the dog's feet every time she comes in, or the kids get drenched through to the the skin at recess and you're constantly drying out stinky boots - it wears a little thin! Teaching a primary grade in the winter is a real challenge. Oh the bigger kids get soaked too, but they can look after themselves. With the little ones, sometimes you spend more time making sure everyone is dry then you do teaching.

As to snow days, they are announced on the local radio stations and cable television. If it is deemed unsafe for kids and teachers to make it to school, then chances are you're not going to be going to work either.
When there's been a big fall of snow, or a major ice storm, you listen to the radio, and schools are usually just one thing in a long list of closures. If you send your kids to school without listening, in those circumstances, then you need to have your head examined, because it's not something they generally do lightly. Usually you have a pretty good idea that it's a snow day before you get the confirmation.
There are occassions when you may hear that schools are open but the busses aren't running, for any of the children who bus to school. That's a decision made by the bus company, probably to avoid lawsuits if anything happens, and then it's your decision whether or not you want to drive your kids in.
It doesn't happen very often, and it's hardly ever unnecessary. In fact, I can only think of one occassion when it really wasn't needed. It was 2 years ago, and they were predicted heavy rains and very high winds as the result of a tornado hitting the Gulf Coast. The closure was called the day before, and it amounted to hardly anything at all. I think, though, that the Superintendent jumped the gun, because the week before a student had been killed by a bus, quite gruesomely and on school property, and I think he was loathe to put any students at even the sligghtest bit of risk.
_________________________
Editor: Movies/Celebrities/Crosswords

"To insult someone we call him 'bestial'. For deliberate cruelty and nature, 'human' might be the greater insult." - Isaac Asimov

Top
#286255 - Sat Nov 26 2005 04:35 PM Re: Aaaaagh!
lothruin Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Wed Nov 12 2003
Posts: 2165
Loc: Nebraska USA
Here it's much the same. Generally, you know the weather is bad enough to at least listen for closings well in advance of them actually doing it. We get maybe 2 or 3 days of school closings in a season. Our school bus system is funded by the school, rather than a private industry, and the school busses are one of the primary reasons for school closings; the schools have the liability of bussing students, and therefore they close schools so as to avoid that liability themselves. If parents have to arrange for other child care, then I guess it's better they take the liability of driving on themselves. In a lot of cases school closings mean one or more parents staying home from work anyway, though the vast majority of students affected by school closings (as they effect every grade from Kindergarten through high school senior) are able to stay home and mind themselves, or there are multiple students in a single home, and at least one of them is old enough to mind their younger siblings. And any children who are not old enough to mind themselves usually have before and after school child care that is also available to them during school holidays and therefore also snow days. It's really a relative few people who are seriously inconvenienced by it.

Last year I dropped our daughter off at daycare and my husband and I went to work, each in our own car, in snow so bad that we couldn't make it back into the driveway at the end of the day. We had to get sand and shovels and dig our ways back IN to our driveways. (And we had to do it, because in heavy snows there is a parking ban on the streets. All cars have to be off the streets so the snow plows can come through.) But my car was stuck with it's rear end sticking out in the street for about 2 hours while we worked to get it back into the garage. Still, I was back at work the next day, too.
_________________________
Goodbye Ruth & Betty, my beautiful grandmothers.
Betty Kuzara 1921 - April 5, 2008
Ruth Kellison 1925 - Dec 27, 2007

Top
#286256 - Sat Nov 26 2005 06:03 PM Re: Aaaaagh!
agony Online   content

Administrator

Registered: Sat Mar 29 2003
Posts: 14973
Loc: Western Canada
Here the buses occasionally will not run, if it is colder than minus 40. The schools are still open, though. I've never heard of a school being closed because of weather, here.
I think this has to do with the fact that we rarely (never, really) get the kind of bad weather that can be predicted, and that lasts a reasonably short time. Our bad weather is either very fast and localized (hailstorms, tornados) or the kind that just sits there, for days and days. No point in shutting everything down for minus 45 weather, much as you may want to, because it may last a week, or even two, and you've got to go out some time. I've only seen the kind of storm you are talking about, Lothruin, maybe twice in my life here.

There were funnel clouds spotted during a storm last summer, and the school was apperently talking about sending students home. That would be crazy, in my opinion - the kids would be in much more danger out on the streets, than in a nice big brick building.

Top
#286257 - Sat Nov 26 2005 06:09 PM Re: Aaaaagh!
damnsuicidalroos Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Mon Feb 10 2003
Posts: 2167
Loc: Sydney
NSW Australia
Hot here then cold then hot, rain then sun etc and that`s in the same day.

The only time I have ever seen snow during "Christmas" is when the Hydro Majestic hotel in the Blue Mountains west of Sydney has it`s Yulefest celebrations in June, July and August.

The cars here don`t get snowed in but the number of vehicles broken down due to the heat is a sad sight.
I would like a snowy Christmas but after chatting with a couple of Canadians a while ago about the salt that gets placed on the roads and the rust and short life-span of cars in such an environment I`m not so sure.

It would be nice to be able to have a Christmas dinner this year and not have to pick ash out of the food.
_________________________
Responds to stimuli, tries to communicate verbally, follows limited commands, laughs or cries in interaction with loved ones.

Top
#286258 - Sat Nov 26 2005 06:20 PM Re: Aaaaagh!
Copago Offline
Moderator

Registered: Tue May 15 2001
Posts: 14384
Loc: Australia
Quote:

Skating at Midnight under the Northern lights or going for a sleigh ride and then having hot chocolate and home made warm from the oven cookies.





Wow - makes me wish it would snow here! HOw idyllic!

Quote:

Admittedly, I’d only trust the Telegraph a hundred per cent if it was reporting on Miss Elizabeth Hurley’s wardrobe, but I dare say it’s accurate enough.






HA!!!!!



Where I grew up we'd get one, maybe two, falls a year and it would barely put an inch on the ground and would usually be gone by late afternoon but still no one would go to school and only a few businesses would be open on full staff. WE're such wusses when it comes to snow.

Top
#286259 - Sat Nov 26 2005 06:28 PM Re: Aaaaagh!
skunkee Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Thu Oct 16 2003
Posts: 10578
Loc: Burlington Ontario Canada  
Agony it's too cold where you are to snow much. We often see that when we're in an extreme cold snap (extreme for us, normal for you), that there's little precipitation, because it's too cold.
However it's not that uncommon for us to get a couple of feet of snow in one storm. Then it's really mucky when all of that melts diring a warm spell, just to have another big dump of snow hit us. When I was younger, it used to stay on the ground for most of the winter. We didn't have the irritating melt, snow, melt, snow pattern that we have now.
I remember one storm, years ago, when the drifts were so high against the doors, that my dad had to go out a window and dig us out.
_________________________
Editor: Movies/Celebrities/Crosswords

"To insult someone we call him 'bestial'. For deliberate cruelty and nature, 'human' might be the greater insult." - Isaac Asimov

Top
#286260 - Sat Nov 26 2005 10:36 PM Re: Aaaaagh!
lothruin Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Wed Nov 12 2003
Posts: 2165
Loc: Nebraska USA
We get storms like that, too, skunkee, and usually our big storms are accompanied by severe winds. (Ah, life on the windy plains...) We usually get a really bad winter followed by a mild one, then back to bad again. Yes, when it's too cold it won't snow, but even just at freezing, a 40mph wind can bring the "feels like" temp way down, and you get snow blowing in your face to boot. The last time I had to dig myself out of my home was only about 5 years ago, but it wasn't because of the amount of snow dumped on us, though a foot is fairly significant, it was the wind blowing it up against the doors in drifts 5 feet high. The driveway was swept practically clean, so getting the cars out was no problem, but getting TO the cars was an adventure all it's own. It's this wind that is the real reason for the school closings. Well, that and the ice. We often get 4-6" of snow on top of a quarter inch of ice, because the storm starts of at just warm enough it rains, and then the temp drops and the snow starts. Add the wind factor and driving is downright treacherous. Black ice. It's thin enough it looks like road under the snow. Bad times. That's why the schools usually only close if it's actively blizzarding or if it did so overnight and the road crews haven't had time to put gravel and salt down yet so the roads are still a nightmare. God bless the men on the road crews. They work the snow plows and gravel trucks on endless shifts through the worst storms.

Last January a couple froze to death not far from where I am. They were out driving in a blizzard and pulled over because they got scared. Their second mistake was to leave the car. They got lost in the storm. It was blowing too hard for them to see where they were going and though they placed numerous 911 calls, nobody could figure out where they were. They didn't know themselves. Their first mistake was to be out driving in a blizzard while doped up in crystal meth... But still. Our storms are killers.
_________________________
Goodbye Ruth & Betty, my beautiful grandmothers.
Betty Kuzara 1921 - April 5, 2008
Ruth Kellison 1925 - Dec 27, 2007

Top
#286261 - Sun Nov 27 2005 08:33 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
sue943 Offline
Administrator

Registered: Sun Dec 19 1999
Posts: 37383
Loc: Jersey
Channel Islands    
Quote:

Where I grew up we'd get one, maybe two, falls a year and it would barely put an inch on the ground and would usually be gone by late afternoon but still no one would go to school and only a few businesses would be open on full staff. WE're such wusses when it comes to snow.




Yep, an inch sitting on the ground will shut this island down. Cars will be abandoned halfway across roads, one slide and the driver will leap out and walk, no attempt to remove the vehicle. Schools will close, businesses will be run with skeleton staff, those who can walk basically.

Last winter we had a couple of days with sheet ice on the roads, I wouldn't even attempt to take my car after the first day - it was a nightmare. I worked from home for a couple of days, I had remote access to my office computer.

There are a couple of major problems here, firstly all buses start in town and almost everyone works in town, almost everywhere involves a steep hill when travelling from town, not good in ice and snow. Second problem is that most of our roads are VERY narrow, often requiring one car to back up if meeting a vehicle travelling in the opposite direction, this is compounded by granite walls on each side of the road, slide and you either hit a car or a wall. Expensive.
_________________________
Many a child has been spoiled because you can't spank a Grandma!

Top
#286262 - Sun Nov 27 2005 10:22 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
skunkee Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Thu Oct 16 2003
Posts: 10578
Loc: Burlington Ontario Canada  
It's funny what closes down different places. A few years ago we were driving down to Florida, trailer in tow (we were going to camp at Disney World).
We were in Kentucky when we stopped for dinner, and the sign on the door said that the restaurant was closing early because of upcoming, predicted weather.
We asked the waitress what they expected, and she said, in a dramatic voice, that they were expecting up to another whole inch. It was very hard to keep a straight face at that one!
But you're right Lothruin, wind is a killer, especially when combined with falling snow. White outs are common around here, and they are definitely terrifying to drive through
_________________________
Editor: Movies/Celebrities/Crosswords

"To insult someone we call him 'bestial'. For deliberate cruelty and nature, 'human' might be the greater insult." - Isaac Asimov

Top
#286263 - Sun Nov 27 2005 10:37 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
agony Online   content

Administrator

Registered: Sat Mar 29 2003
Posts: 14973
Loc: Western Canada
A lot has to do with the way vehicles are equipped - specifically tires. Our first snowfall last fall was a heavy one, I was out on the highway, and driving a vehicle that we had just gotten that summer - never driven on snow with it before. Not only did it only have summer tires, but they were old and bald. I'm a pretty good winter driver, but that was the worst trip I have ever taken!
I suspect that most people in Kentucky (or Jersey, for that matter) don't have winter tires, or even all season radials, on their vehicles.

Top
#286264 - Sun Nov 27 2005 12:13 PM Re: Aaaaagh!
lothruin Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Wed Nov 12 2003
Posts: 2165
Loc: Nebraska USA
It'd be way to expensive to have full sets of tires for each of the extreme weather conditions we get here. The massive amounts of snow and ice in winter, the torrential rains in spring (and sometimes fall!) and the hot, humid summers that are enough to melt tires right to the asphalt if you're not careful. All season tires are the only way to go here! And some cars just handle better in winter. I drove a Pontiac Grand Am for many years. An early 90's Grand Am. You know, the ones that were really pretty terrible cars? But that thing took winter weather like it was nothing! Most of the Hondas do pretty well as well, and they're real workhorses as far as engines go, too. (My friend says that Honda and Chevy should get together to build a car. The chevy bodies last twice as long as the engines, and the Honda engines last twice as long as the bodies...) And then my boss leased a Chrystler 300M and as soon as the lease is up she's getting rid of it. It handles so poorly in winter weather, no matter what tires it has, that she frequently has her son drive her to work in his Jeep Cherokee in winter.
_________________________
Goodbye Ruth & Betty, my beautiful grandmothers.
Betty Kuzara 1921 - April 5, 2008
Ruth Kellison 1925 - Dec 27, 2007

Top
#286265 - Mon Nov 28 2005 05:15 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
JaneMarple Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Fri Jan 30 2004
Posts: 14480
Loc: North West of England
We've our first little bit of snow today. Not sticking, but pretty large flakes
_________________________
My mind is like a parachute...it functions only when open.

Top
#286266 - Mon Nov 28 2005 05:35 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
ozzz2002 Offline
Moderator

Registered: Mon Dec 03 2001
Posts: 19996
Loc: Sydney NSW Australia
Coldest November 28th on record in Sydney today- we had a max of 16.4C, but I did not mind at all- the good thing is that it has been showering for a week or so. Will help fill our water supply which has been down to about 38% of capacity, but I doubt if it will break the drought. The boffins are tipping a hot, dry summer with lots of bushfires. (But they do that every year )
_________________________
The key to everything is patience. You get the chicken by hatching the egg, not smashing it.

Ex-Editor, Hobbies and Sports, and Forum Moderator

Top
#286267 - Mon Nov 28 2005 06:10 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
ing Offline
Prolific

Registered: Wed Mar 30 2005
Posts: 1636
Loc: Canberra ACT Australia  
I'm freezing - it's about 10C at the moment, which is just ridiculous for this time of year. No wonder I've got a headache .

Top
#286268 - Mon Nov 28 2005 06:58 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
skunkee Offline
Star Poster

Registered: Thu Oct 16 2003
Posts: 10578
Loc: Burlington Ontario Canada  
We've had rain and all of our snow has melted.
It's about 10 celcius today, which is more normal for this time of year.
_________________________
Editor: Movies/Celebrities/Crosswords

"To insult someone we call him 'bestial'. For deliberate cruelty and nature, 'human' might be the greater insult." - Isaac Asimov

Top
#286269 - Mon Nov 28 2005 07:20 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
agony Online   content

Administrator

Registered: Sat Mar 29 2003
Posts: 14973
Loc: Western Canada
So Canberra and Burlington have the same temperature - amazing.
Staying just fine for the time of year here - within 5 degrees either side of freezing. They keep predicting cold and snow, but we lasted the weekend, anyway.

Top
#286270 - Mon Nov 28 2005 08:55 AM Re: Aaaaagh!
lothruin Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Wed Nov 12 2003
Posts: 2165
Loc: Nebraska USA
Yeah, I'm right in the path of the big snowstorm sweeping the midwestern US right now. One of my coworkers' kids rural school is closed because of ice. An hour West of us it's snow, snow, snow. yay!
_________________________
Goodbye Ruth & Betty, my beautiful grandmothers.
Betty Kuzara 1921 - April 5, 2008
Ruth Kellison 1925 - Dec 27, 2007

Top
Page 2 of 6 < 1 2 3 4 5 6 >

Moderator:  ren33, sue943