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#339999 - Fri Jan 05 2007 09:58 AM Please help Harriet
sue943 Offline
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Registered: Sun Dec 19 1999
Posts: 37535
Loc: Jersey
Channel Islands    
Please visit the website telling the story of Harriet the Jersey cow who lives in Gloucestershire in England. Please post messages of support, she needs you!

http://www.harriet-thecow.co.uk/
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#340000 - Fri Jan 05 2007 12:21 PM Re: Please help Harriet
ClaraSue Offline
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Registered: Sun May 18 2003
Posts: 7837
Loc: Arizona USA
Oh, the poor thing. I sent my support wishes.
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#340001 - Fri Jan 05 2007 04:26 PM Re: Please help Harriet
tiffanyram Offline
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Registered: Tue Jun 13 2006
Posts: 2547
Loc: Tennessee USA
That's a terrible thing for them to try and do to that cow and that family! I just read the story and left a message of support.
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#340002 - Fri Jan 05 2007 04:45 PM Re: Please help Harriet
picqero Offline
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Registered: Tue Dec 28 2004
Posts: 2813
Loc: Hertfordshire<br>England UK
A friend of mine is a dairy farmer in Shropshire, having around 200 pedigree Guernseys. I've helped with round-up, milking and even calving at various times, and it's surprising to note the varying temperaments of the cows. Some are really friendly, while others can be bad tempered and aggressive, and Harriet is obviously the former type.
It's easy to get quite attached to the friendly cows, but farmers have to be hard headed - or hard hearted some might say - businessmen, and try not to allow any cow to become a 'pet'. I recall one particular cow though, which had acquired 'pet' status, and was destined for retirement rather than slaughter when her milk yield fell. She'd allow you to sit on her back, or lay up against her if she was lying down in the field.
There's no reason why a cow shouldn't be kept as a pet, and I wish the family luck with Harriet, though they will have to fully comply with agricultural regulations.

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#340003 - Fri Jan 05 2007 05:10 PM Re: Please help Harriet
hintmaster Offline
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Registered: Mon Nov 20 2006
Posts: 155
Loc: Ontario Canada
poor Harriet
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#340004 - Tue Jan 09 2007 10:03 AM Re: Please help Harriet
sue943 Offline
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Registered: Sun Dec 19 1999
Posts: 37535
Loc: Jersey
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Our local newspaper has now got in on this story, since the cow is a Jersey.

" Save our Harriet!

By Diane Simon

A FAMILY in Gloucester battling to save their pet Jersey cow from slaughter have had their case taken to the House of Commons - and it could even go to the European Union.

Harriet the Jersey cow (pictured) has been the pet of self-employed builder David Price and his partner Liz Davis from the Forest of Dean in Gloucester since 2000.

The problem arose when officials from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs said Harriet must be slaughtered because she was born on a farm in Oxford five months after a calf there which developed BSE.

However, her owners said Harriet lived a mile away from the infected calf and did not come into contact with it.

Published 09/01/07 - Jersey Evening Post
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#340005 - Tue Jan 09 2007 11:16 AM Re: Please help Harriet
SRSTrekker Offline
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Registered: Tue Sep 14 2004
Posts: 202
Loc: Arizona USA
OK, call me ignorant, but what is BSE? I figure it is some kind of disease that can be harmful to humans, but what exactly is it?

Even with not knowing what it really is, I still don't think that they should kill Harriet just because they "think" this poor cow has this disease. They should wait until that test can be ready and can tell them if this cow has it if they are so concerned. What would they do if they find out after that Harriet did not have this BSE?
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#340006 - Tue Jan 09 2007 01:14 PM Re: Please help Harriet
ren33 Offline
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Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 12496
Loc: Kowloon Tong  Hong Kong      
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) or mad cow disease is a chronic, degenerative disorder affecting the central nervous system of cattle.
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#340007 - Tue Jan 09 2007 01:32 PM Re: Please help Harriet
sue943 Offline
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Registered: Sun Dec 19 1999
Posts: 37535
Loc: Jersey
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Harriet got a bigger spread in our local newspaper today than Sara and I got!
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#340008 - Tue Jan 09 2007 03:34 PM Re: Please help Harriet
ElfTwinkle Offline
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Registered: Wed Jul 10 2002
Posts: 14929
Loc: Crazy Canuck   
First off, I am a dairy farmer. Yes, we do become attached to our animals, but we sometimes have to give in and do things we'd prefer not to have to do.


Quote:

Even with not knowing what it really is, I still don't think that they should kill Harriet just because they "think" this poor cow has this disease. They should wait until that test can be ready and can tell them if this cow has it if they are so concerned. What would they do if they find out after that Harriet did not have this BSE?




Unfortunately, while the reasoning sounds good, it isn't entirely feasible.

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, sometimes referred to as "mad cow disease") and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) belong to the unusual group of progressively degenerative neurological diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs).
Although not scientifically proven, there is strong epidemiologic and laboratory data linking a rare, degenerative, fatal brain disorder in humans called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD) to the consumption of BSE-contaminated product.
These diseases are characterized by an incubation period of several months to several years, during which there is no visible indication of the disease.

Currently, there is no test to detect the disease in a live animal or in muscle meat. Veterinary pathologists confirm BSE by postmortem microscopic examination of brain tissue using sophisticated laboratory techniques, such as a histopathological examination to detect sponge-like changes in the brain tissue and immunohistochemistry to examine the BSE fibrils. These are "gold-standard" tests, and they take more than a week to run. More rapid tests that provide results within 36 to 48 hours have been developed to detect the abnormal prion in brain or spinal cord tissue of dead animals. Rapid tests can be used to determine if BSE exists in a population and to obtain an indication of its prevalence or detect animals with the disease which are not yet showing clinical signs.
(There is no available diagnostic test for the BSE agent ---
Bioassay of brain tissue of terminally affected cattle or other species by parenteral inoculation of mice is the only method currently available for detection of infectivity. This is impractical because of minimum incubation periods approaching 300 days --- The absence of detectable immune responses in BSE or other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies precludes serological tests.)


Edited by ElfTwinkle (Tue Jan 09 2007 03:43 PM)

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#340009 - Tue Jan 09 2007 04:05 PM Re: Please help Harriet
tiffanyram Offline
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Registered: Tue Jun 13 2006
Posts: 2547
Loc: Tennessee USA
Quote:

Although not scientifically proven, there is strong epidemiologic and laboratory data linking a rare, degenerative, fatal brain disorder in humans called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD) to the consumption of BSE-contaminated product.




If this can only harm humans if consumed, then I see no reason why Harriet shouldn't live if she is always going to be a pet and they have no intention of having her slaughtered for the meat.

And thanks ElfTwinkle for the description, I learned something today.
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#340010 - Wed Jan 10 2007 10:00 AM Re: Please help Harriet
ElfTwinkle Offline
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Registered: Wed Jul 10 2002
Posts: 14929
Loc: Crazy Canuck   
Quote:

If this can only harm humans if consumed, then I see no reason why Harriet shouldn't live if she is always going to be a pet and they have no intention of having her slaughtered for the meat.





Agreed, they (the owners) have no intention of having her slaughtered for meat --- unfortunately, there are still ways (obviously illegal ways) that meat from Harriet could end up being consumed by humans --- it could happen without the family having any knowledge of it. (It only takes one, or 2 unscrupulous people to make it happen.) The chances of it happening are very small due to all the regulations, but it is possible.
Without going into details, I know that it can and does happen despite all the rules --- in fact there's a case (NOT BSE related) currently before our courts involving circumstances where meat that should never have been anywhere near a plant that processes meat for human use was processing it (ie meat that should never have been anywhere near a plant that processes meat for human use) into meat for human consumption.


Edited by ElfTwinkle (Wed Jan 10 2007 10:10 AM)

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