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#63330 - Wed Nov 08 2000 11:32 AM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
BagLady Offline
Prolific

Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 1979
Loc: Shangri-La USA
Ninth Cavalry Regiment


After the Civil War the United States Army formed a black (negro) contingent in the regular army to serve on the Western Frontier. It consisted of six regiments - the Ninth and Tenth Cavalry were two of them. They were organized with ex-Civil War Negro soldiers, who wanted to remain in the Army. Their job, among many others, was to control hostile Indians on the Great Plains and to escort and protect wagon trains and stagecoaches.

The men of these two regiments were dubbed "Buffalo Soldiers" by their Indian opponents. They were proud of this title, and the most prominent feature of the Tenth Cavalry's regimental crest was the figure of a buffalo. They developed into remarkable fighting units during their extensive engagements on the Plains. Presence of the Buffalo Soldiers and other military units on the Western Frontier discouraged lawlessness among hostile forces and conflicts between unruly white settlers.

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Coffee, chocolate, men...some things are just better rich.

_________________________
The stupid neither forgive nor forget;
The nave forgive and forget;
The wise forgive, but do not forget.

....[i]Thomas Szasz</I]

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#63331 - Wed Nov 08 2000 03:27 PM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
Anonymous
No longer registered


Turner, Fredrick Jackson

Long, but worthwhile . . .
Turner was born in Portage, Wisconsin, in 1861. His father, a journalist by trade and local historian by avocation, piqued Turner's interest in history. After his graduation from the University of Wisconsin in 1884, Turner decided to become a professional historian, and received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1890. He served as a teacher and scholar at the University of Wisconsin from 1889 to 1910, when he joined Harvard's faculty. He retired in 1924 but continued his research until his death in 1932.

Turner's contribution to American history was to argue that the frontier past best explained the distinctive history of the United States. He most cogently articulated this idea in "The Significance of the Frontier in American History," which he first delivered to a gathering of historians in 1893 at Chicago, then the site of the World's Columbian Exposition, an enormous fair to mark the four-hundredth anniversary of Columbus' voyage. Although almost totally ignored at the time, Turner's lecture eventually gained such wide distribution and influence that a contemporary scholar has called it "the single most influential piece of writing in the history of American history."

Three years before Turner's pronouncement of the frontier thesis, the U.S. Census Bureau had announced the disappearance of a contiguous frontier line. Turner took this "closing of the frontier" as an opportunity to reflect upon the influence it had exercised. He argued that the frontier had meant that every American generation returned "to primitive conditions on a continually advancing frontier line." Along this frontier -- which he also described as "the meeting point between savagery and civilization" -- Americans again and again recapitulated the developmental stages of the emerging industrial order of the 1890's. This development, in Turner's description of the frontier, "begins with the Indian and the hunter; it goes on with the disintegration of savagery by the entrance of the trader... the pastoral stage in ranch life; the exploitation of the soil by the raising of unrotated crops of corn and wheat in sparsely settled farm communities; the intensive culture of the denser farm settlement; and finally the manufacturing organization with the city and the factory system."

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IndianPainter
Alex, I'll take 'Lower Your IQ Average' for one dollar, please. I think that is what it is called.


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#63332 - Wed Nov 08 2000 07:07 PM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
Pinhead Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 3185
Loc: The Dark Side of the Moon...
NACOGDOCHES TEXAS CHRONICLE. The [b]Nacogdoches Texas Chronicle

A weekly newspaper, was published from sometime in 1836 until August 1838. In the fall of 1837 the paper advanced Thomas J. Rusk for the presidency of the Republic of Texas.

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"What a waste it is to lose one's mind. Or not to have a mind is being very wasteful. How true that is.".............
Dan Quayle


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#63333 - Wed Nov 08 2000 11:43 PM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
CellarDoor Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Sat Feb 12 2000
Posts: 4894
Loc: Seattle
Washington USA
Evans, Julia Eldredge

Julia Evans, born in Iowa in 1848, traveled west to Idaho with her husband Hyrum Eldredge, who died in 1884, leaving her with eight children of whom the youngest was only one year old. Later she married Ben Evans, who went out one day to hunt for his stolen sheep and never returned. (It was assumed that he had surprised the thieves and they had killed him).

She supported her family by selling soap and hominy, but still found time to help her friends and relatives care for the sick and dying. Apparently she was quite a personality: an Indian once offered a pony for her. She died in Boise, Idaho, in 1951, at the amazing age of 103.

_________________________
Just because there's twilight doesn't mean we can't tell the difference between night and day

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#63334 - Thu Nov 09 2000 02:09 AM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
Anonymous
No longer registered


EXTRATERRITORIAL EXPANSIONARY POLICIES


Policies followed by successive US Governments in the early - mid to late 1800's that created the current status of 50 US states. Land that was not currently controlled by US was claimed and or annexed.


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#63335 - Thu Nov 09 2000 06:39 AM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
Sagebrush Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Tue Jan 04 2000
Posts: 2339
Loc: Wichita
Kansas USA

Only 7 people posted an entry yesterday and one of those entries was invalid.


Here are the results so far:

Pinhead...................80
Mamaja...................71
Baglady...................54
SageBrush..............52
karmaloupster........47
CellarDoor..............42
Fortunata................38
Linkay49.................36
Smiley......................21
Boyscout................20
PartsDude...............17

Good Luck!


_________________________
Venture into my realm at Ft. Sage

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#63336 - Thu Nov 09 2000 06:43 AM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
Sagebrush Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Tue Jan 04 2000
Posts: 2339
Loc: Wichita
Kansas USA

Sutter's Mill, California

Site of the great and memorable discovery of gold in California which started the California gold rush.

_________________________
Venture into my realm at Ft. Sage

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#63337 - Thu Nov 09 2000 11:33 AM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
BagLady Offline
Prolific

Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 1979
Loc: Shangri-La USA
Adobe Walls Trading Post


Site of the largest Indian battle in Texas. Approximately 700 warriors from the Comanche, Cheyenne and Kiowa Indian Tribes were defeated by 28 brave frontiersmen. The battle ended on the 2nd day. As the story goes, one 'crack shot', Billy Dixon, shot an indian off his horse 9/10 of a mile away, successfully forcing the remaining indians away.

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Coffee, chocolate, men...some things are just better rich.

_________________________
The stupid neither forgive nor forget;
The nave forgive and forget;
The wise forgive, but do not forget.

....[i]Thomas Szasz</I]

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#63338 - Thu Nov 09 2000 03:35 PM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
Anonymous
No longer registered


Glidden, Joseph Farwell

Invented barbed wire.


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#63339 - Thu Nov 09 2000 05:01 PM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
Pinhead Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 3185
Loc: The Dark Side of the Moon...
LEDBETTER, WILLIAM HAMILTON


In 1862 he was commissioned a lieutenant in Company I of Col. George M. Flournoy's Sixteenth Confederate Texas Infantry.


Since this is a free slot, I posted early, since I am not going to be here..(going to see 'The Tubes')

Thanks

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"What a waste it is to lose one's mind. Or not to have a mind is being very wasteful. How true that is.".............
Dan Quayle


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#63340 - Thu Nov 09 2000 10:38 PM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
CellarDoor Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Sat Feb 12 2000
Posts: 4894
Loc: Seattle
Washington USA
Posting early, in an empty time slot, with no people posting between this slot and my normal one ...

Norton, Joshua Abraham 1818-1880

An unbelievable story:

Born in London and raised in South Africa, Norton moved to San Francisco in 1849 as part of the Gold Rush, hoping to strike it rich and make up for his several failed businesses. He became a commodities merchant and for several years was quite successful. But in 1853 he became bankrupt. And totally insane. In 1858 he made the following declaration:

quote:
At the peremptory request and desire of a large majority of the citizens of the United States, I, Joshua Norton, declare and proclaim myself Emperor of these United States.
For the next 21 years, he roamed San Francisco dressed in a European-style military uniform, wearing a sword and a hat with a feather. He was the inspiration for the delusional King in Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn, and when "Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico" died, three thousand people attended his funeral.
_________________________
Just because there's twilight doesn't mean we can't tell the difference between night and day

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#63341 - Fri Nov 10 2000 03:04 AM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
Anonymous
No longer registered



MUCKLESHOOT RESERVATION, WASHINGTON


...After a brief period of armed resistance, the ancestors of today's Muckleshoot people settled on their current reservation, which was set aside for them pursuant to Treaties of Point Elliott and Medicine Creek. It is located at a place called Muckleshoot Prairie. Northwest Native Peoples are generally named after the locations of their villages. Thus, within a few years, those who relocated there, who had called themselves by names like Stkamish, Yilalkoamish, Skopamish, Smulkamish and Tkwakwamish came to refer to themselves by the name of their new home: "Muckleshoot."
As time passed, a number of people from other local tribes, such as the Duwamish and Snoqualmie, were absorbed into the Muckleshoot Tribe, as well as other neighboring federally recognized Tribes such as the Tulalip and Suquamish. The six square-mile Muckleshoot Reservation, which is laid out diagonally, has 20 miles of boundaries. Soon after its establishment, it was surrounded by the farms of settlers, which remains the case today, except that urbanization has increasingly encroached on the westerly portion of the reservation.

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If all the worlds wealth were divided between every man, woman & child
presently alive on the planet, we would all have $13 million a piece.
**************************************************

$13 Million for every single Human....
**************************************************


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#63342 - Fri Nov 10 2000 06:43 AM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
Sagebrush Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Tue Jan 04 2000
Posts: 2339
Loc: Wichita
Kansas USA

Well, we're down to the last day of of another week. Wonder how Sypher is doing in Oz land.


Here are the results so far:

Pinhead...................104
karmaloupster........86
SageBrush..............73
Mamaja...................71
Baglady...................71
CellarDoor..............61
Boyscout................40
Fortunata................38
Linkay49.................36
Smiley......................21
PartsDude...............17

Good Luck!

_________________________
Venture into my realm at Ft. Sage

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#63343 - Fri Nov 10 2000 06:45 AM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
Sagebrush Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Tue Jan 04 2000
Posts: 2339
Loc: Wichita
Kansas USA

Navaho Indians

Native American tribe fron the southwest.

_________________________
Venture into my realm at Ft. Sage

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#63344 - Fri Nov 10 2000 10:37 AM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
BagLady Offline
Prolific

Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 1979
Loc: Shangri-La USA
All I can say is...the stories this week have been terrific! Hope you enjoy this one.

South Pass, Wyoming

South Pass was the key to the entire overland emigration. The easy grade of this pass was the doorway through the Rocky Mountains on the Oregon Trail and across the Continental Divide, and opened the West for settlement. It was called "Uncle Sam's backbone" by the emigrants. The first South Pass City was an 1850s stage and telegraph station where the trail made its final crossing of the Sweetwater River.

Without South Pass, wagon travel across the continent would have been impossible, and Oregon and California would probably not have become a part of the United States. It is said to have been discovered by Robert Stuart in 1812. He worked for a multi-millionaire named John Jacob Astor. However, for most people, the pass was unknown until 1824 when it was re-discovered by Jedediah Smith, probably one of the most famous of the 'Mountain Men'.

_________________________
The stupid neither forgive nor forget;
The nave forgive and forget;
The wise forgive, but do not forget.

....[i]Thomas Szasz</I]

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#63345 - Fri Nov 10 2000 04:53 PM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
Anonymous
No longer registered


GARRETT, JAMES GIRARD

(1806-1836). James Girard Garrett, Alamo defender, was born in Tennessee in 1806. He was a resident of Louisiana when he marched to Texas as a member of Capt. Thomas H. Breece' company of New Orleans Greys in 1835. Garrett took part in the siege of Bexar and later served in the Alamo garrison. He died in the battle of the Alamo on March 6, 1836.


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IndianPainter
Survivor?!? HAH! We have the presidential race!


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#63346 - Fri Nov 10 2000 05:38 PM Re: Snake - Game - # 47
Pinhead Offline
Multiloquent

Registered: Thu Sep 30 1999
Posts: 3185
Loc: The Dark Side of the Moon...
DICKINSON, SUSANNA WILKERSON

(1841-1883)


Santa Anna sent Susanna and her daughter, accompanied by Juan N. Almonte's servant Ben, to Sam Houston with a letter of warning dated March 7. On the way, the pair met Joe, William B. Travis's slave, who had been freed by Santa Anna. The party was discovered by Erastus (Deaf) Smith and Henry Wax Karnes. Smith guided them to Houston in Gonzales, where they arrived after dark about March 12.

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"What a waste it is to lose one's mind. Or not to have a mind is being very wasteful. How true that is.".............
Dan Quayle


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