Quiz about Here Lies 3
Quiz about Here Lies 3

Here Lies (3) Trivia Quiz


'Here Lies (3)' is all about celebrity deaths and their burial locations. If you like this quiz, you can also check out 'Here Lies' and 'Here Lies (2)'.

A multiple-choice quiz by heatherlois. Estimated time: 4 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Celebrity Trivia
  6. »
  7. Death Becomes Them
  8. »
  9. Celebrity Burial Locations

Author
heatherlois
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
410,509
Updated
Nov 17 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Very Easy
Avg Score
10 / 10
Plays
341
Last 3 plays: Andyboy2021 (10/10), Guest 107 (10/10), loriannie (8/10).
Author's Note: As with my other 'Here Lies' quizzes, I have provided clues, though some of them are decidedly corny (for which I apologise profusely in advance!)
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Who am I? I was born in 1946 in Tanzania and died, aged 45, in London. Only one person knows exactly where my ashes are scattered. (I trust the organisers of my funeral all have 'One Vision'.) Hint

Nelson Mandela
Freddy Mercury
Pablo Picasso
Joan of Arc

2. Who am I? I was born in New Orleans in 1901 and died of a heart attack in 1971. I was buried in Flushing, Queens, USA. Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra attended my funeral. (I do hope angels 'trumpeted' my arrival into heaven.) Hint

Genghis Khan
John Keats
Jack Lemmon
Louis Armstrong

3. Who am I? An American actor, I was born in Iowa in 1914 and I died, rather suspiciously, from a gunshot wound in LA in 1959. My ashes are in a crypt in Pasadena Mausoleum. (I wonder if, during my eulogies, anyone called me a really 'super man'?) Hint

Fred Astaire
George Orwell
Daniel Boone
George Reeves

4. Who am I? I was born in 1946 in Italy and was reportedly diagnosed with ear cancer in 1993, but it was a serial killer who caused my death in 1997. My funeral was at Milan Cathedral and was attended by Princess Di. (I wonder if my funeral was 'fashioned' to my wishes?) Hint

Steve Jobs
Peter Sellers
Mae West
Gianni Versace

5. Who am I? I was born in England in 1948 and moved to Australia when I was five. I died in 2022 after many years of fighting cancer. (Some of my ashes were scattered at Bryon Bay, Australia - hopefully in a nice 'sandy' spot.) Hint

Nancy Reagan
Vera Lynn
Dame Olivia Newton John
Whitney Houston

6. Who am I? I was born in 1923 in Manhattan and died age 82 in 2005. My plaque has a depiction of me holding my shoe. ('Would you believe' there was absolutely no chaos at my funeral?) Hint

Peter Sellers
Roald Dahl
Don Adams
Jack Lemmon

7. Who am I? A woman full of grace and elegance, I was born in Belgium in 1929, and I died in 1993, just 3 months after I was diagnosed with cancer. I was buried near my home in Tolochenaz, Switzerland. (Hopefully the mourners 'go lightly' on the tears when they remember me.) Hint

Betty White
Audrey Hepburn
Margaret Thatcher
Zsa Zsa Gabor

8. Who am I? A singer, I am one of four brothers. I was born on The Isle of Man in 1949 and died in London in 2012. I was buried opposite my home in Oxfordshire, UK. (I'm sure all my mourners thought my death was a terrible 'tragedy.') Hint

David Niven
Roald Dahl
Robin Gibb CBE
Jim Morrison

9. Who am I? A proflic writer, I was born in the UK in 1812 and I died suddenly, aged 58, in 1870. In honour of my life's works, I was buried in Westminster Abbey.
(I wonder if people had 'great expectations' for my funeral?)
Hint

Charles Dickens
Sylvia Plath
Leo Tolstoy
Marcel Proust

10. Who am I? I was born in Edinburgh in 1930 and once worked as a coffin polisher. I died on Lyford Cay, the Bahamas, in 2020. Some of my ashes were spread over St Andrews Golf Course. (I do hope the mourners at my funeral were 'stirred' and not just 'shaken'!) Hint

Vera Lynn
Paul Walker
Sir Sean Connery
John Candy


(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Who am I? I was born in 1946 in Tanzania and died, aged 45, in London. Only one person knows exactly where my ashes are scattered. (I trust the organisers of my funeral all have 'One Vision'.)

Answer: Freddy Mercury

Freddy Mercury (b. Farrokh Bulsara) was born in Zanzibar, Tanzania in 1946. A musician, he was the lead singer of 'Queen' and a hugely talented songwriter and performer. Freddy moved from Tanzania to the UK with his family in 1964 and set up 'Queen' in 1971. For those interested in his complete biography, there are several documentaries that follow Freddie's incredible life, including my personal favourite, 'Queen: Days of our Lives'. (I still cry every time I watch this.) There is also the award-winning film 'Bohemian Rhapsody,' which starred the very talented Rami Malek.

Freddie's life was tragically cut short when, in 1991, he succumbed to bronchial pneumonia due to AIDS-related complications. He was just 45 years old when he died on 24 November in his Kensington home, just one day after admitting that he was AIDS positive. Freddie had a private funeral attended by just 35 family and friends. The funeral, which was conducted by a Zoroastrian priest, was held at the West London Crematorium and was attended by his long time friend, Mary Austin, as well as his boyfriend, Jim Hutton, Elton John and, of course, the remaining members of Queen. Elton John recounted that the funeral was all spoken in Parsees, which meant very few understood what was being said. Freddy, who was inspired by opera music, had the aria, 'D'amour sull 'ali Rose' by Verdi as the final piece of music played at his funeral.

It is believed Freddie's gravestone is in Kensal Green Cemetery in West London, where a plaque was discovered in 2013 which bears Freddie's birth name, birth and death dates, and a French inscription which translates as 'always to be close to you, with all my love, M.' Freddie's ashes were entrusted to Mary to be scattered in a secret location, as Freddy worried that a fan would try to dig them up if the whereabouts became known. Mary scattered the ashes several years after Freddie's death, and per his wishes, has never revealed their location, not even to his family.

Prior to his death, Freddy spent much of his time in the town of Montreux in Switzerland. It was here that Freddy felt serene, and it was here that he recorded his last, very beautiful album, 'Made in Heaven'. In 1996 a three-metre tall statue of Freddy, dressed in the outfit he was wearing at the 1986 Wembley concert, was erected on the lakeside promenade in Montreux. The statue is iconic Freddy - he is depicted with one fist raised in the air, while the other is grasping a microphone stand.
(The clue btw, was 'One Vision' a song by Queen).
2. Who am I? I was born in New Orleans in 1901 and died of a heart attack in 1971. I was buried in Flushing, Queens, USA. Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra attended my funeral. (I do hope angels 'trumpeted' my arrival into heaven.)

Answer: Louis Armstrong

Louis Amstrong (aka 'Satch', 'Satchmo' and 'Pops') was one of the most influential trumpeters and vocalists of the jazz era. Born in an extremely poor neighbourhood in New Orleans, known as 'The Battlefield', to a sixteen year old mother, he had, in the main, what can only be described as a troubled and unsettling childhood. But it was clear from an early age that Louis liked music. He joined a quartet singing for money when he was 11, learnt the cornet when he was 13 and started playing in brass bands on riverboats by the age of 17. 1n 1922, age 21, Louis moved to Chicago at the invitation of his ex-band leader, King Oliver. Here his life changed completely. He got his own apartment and started to work full time as a musician. He also entered into musical battles called 'cutting contests,' and it was partly from these that he started to build his reputation.

Louis went from strength to strength in the next five decades, impressing audiences with his gravelly voice, his skat singing and his masterful trumpet playing. A national music icon, he appeared in the film 'High Society' in 1956 and 'Hello Dolly' in 1969. His most well known musical recordings are probably 'What a Wonderful World', (a personal favourite of mine), 'Mack The Knife' and 'When The Saints Go Marching In'.

The world was shocked when Louis died of a heart attack in his sleep on July 6, 1971, as many felt he was at the top of his game. He died in Queen's, New York and it was in Queen's he had his funeral, which was held with a quiet simplicity, per his family's wishes. His honorary pallbearers included such greats as Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Ed Sullivan and Johnny Carson. Peggy Lee sang 'The Lord's Prayer while a blind singer, Al Hibbler, sang 'When The Saints Go Marching In'. Apparently both sang so quietly, it was difficult for the mourners to hear them.

After the ceremony, Louis' coffin, covered in roses, was taken to The Flushing Cemetery in Queen's. Here his headstone, a black granite affair, simply reads '"Satchmo" Louis Amstrong'.

Louis was, posthumously, awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1972 for his contributions to music.

P.s. if you are wondering how Louis got the nickname 'Satchmo', it was apparently because this was short for 'satchel mouth,' which was a comment on Louis' larger than average mouth and infectious grin.
3. Who am I? An American actor, I was born in Iowa in 1914 and I died, rather suspiciously, from a gunshot wound in LA in 1959. My ashes are in a crypt in Pasadena Mausoleum. (I wonder if, during my eulogies, anyone called me a really 'super man'?)

Answer: George Reeves

George Reeves was born George Keefer Brewer in 1914. An American actor, he is most famous for his role of 'Superman' in the TV series 'The Adventures of Superman'. (Btw George Reeves is absolutely no relation to Christopher Reeve, who was also a Superman; the closeness of the surnames is purely coincidental.)

George studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse in California before starting his career at age 25 in 1939 with a small role in 'Gone with the Wind'. Though he took on many minor roles, it wasn't until 1951 when he was offered the role of Superman, that he became a household name. All up, he was contracted to the Superman series from 1952 to 1958, making it difficult for George to take on other projects; however he did manage a part in 'From Here to Eternity' in 1953.

George wasn't thrilled with being typecast as a TV series action hero (the 'hero' bit was fine, it was the 'TV' bit he objected to as TV was seen as the inferior medium.) Having said that, it is estimated that 'Superman' had an annual audience of 35 million viewers. George did embrace his celebrity when small children were around though, even giving up smoking so he would be seen as a good role model. He also had a few 'moments' with fans, when small children would kick or punch him, believing he was impervious to pain. One child took this too far, pulling a Luger pistol on George. The boy's intention, before George convinced him to put the gun down, was to shoot George to test if Superman was really invincible.

George, unfortunately wasn't, and on June 16, 1959, his naked body was found in his bedroom with a gunshot wound to the head. Though George's death was ruled a suicide - as he was cited as being depressed - there is, even today, controversy surrounding his death. To some, the evidence suggested a possible accident or foul play - since there were no fingerprints found on the gun and no gunpowder residue found on George.

45 year-old George was laid to rest in the Mountain View Cemetary in Altadena, California, where his ashes are contained in a crypt in the Pasadena Mausoleum. A memorial plaque, written by his mother, reads 'My Beloved Son - "Superman" - George Bessolo Reeves - Jan.6.1914 - June.16.1959'. In 1960 he received, posthumously, a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
4. Who am I? I was born in 1946 in Italy and was reportedly diagnosed with ear cancer in 1993, but it was a serial killer who caused my death in 1997. My funeral was at Milan Cathedral and was attended by Princess Di. (I wonder if my funeral was 'fashioned' to my wishes?)

Answer: Gianni Versace

Gianni Versace was born in Reggio di Calabria, Italy in 1946. His mother was a dressmaker who owned a boutique and Gianni, as a young man, watched her create her designs and also worked in her boutique for a time. In 1972, at age 26, Gianni moved to Milan where he worked for several high class designers.
Six years later, he, his sister, Donatella, and brother, Santo, started the label 'Gianni Versace SPA'. Gianni's designs at the beginning of his career were sensual, provocative and controversial. His fashion shows during this time were more like rock concerts than runway shows, and as such were hugely popular with celebrities. In the late 80s he started incorporating haute couture and costume design into his repertoire. His company continued to grow through the 90s, extending to include designer clothing, handbags, perfume, jewellery and homewares. His empire was worth $800 million at the time of his death.

Gianni was very ill from 1993 to early 1997, and it was speculated that he was HIV positive. His sister, Donatella, however, insisted he had a rare inner ear cancer which was cured in early 1997. Sadly, just 6 months later, on July 15, as Gianni was returning from a morning walk, serial killer Andrew Cunanan shot and killed Gianni on the steps of Gianni's home. Cunanan, a homosexual who befriended wealthy older men, went on a killing spree between April 27 to July 15, 1997, killing five people in cold blood. The police could find no motive for the killings. Eight days after murdering Gianni - his last victim - and during a massive police manhunt, the 27 year old Cunanan fatally shot himself.

50 year-old Gianni had a funeral in Milan Cathedral. It was attended by 2000 mourners including Princess Di (who would die less than six weeks later in a car crash), Karl Lagerfeld, Sting, Caroline Bassette Kennedy (who would die two years later in a plane crash), Giorgio Armani and Elton John. Sting and Elton John reportedly sang a heartfelt rendition of 'The Lord is my Shepherd' at the funeral.

Gianni's body was cremated and his ashes were buried in the family vault at Moltrasio cemetery in Italy, overlooking the beautiful Lake Como.
5. Who am I? I was born in England in 1948 and moved to Australia when I was five. I died in 2022 after many years of fighting cancer. (Some of my ashes were scattered at Bryon Bay, Australia - hopefully in a nice 'sandy' spot.)

Answer: Dame Olivia Newton John

Dame Olivia Newton John was born in Cambridge in 1948. She came from a very interesting family, her maternal grandfather being a Nobel Prize winner, and her father being an MI5 officer at Bletchley Park. Olivia and her family moved to Melbourne, Australia when she was five, and from an early age she showed an interest in singing. At age 17 she entered a talent contest in Australia which she won, and she took her prize - a trip back to the UK - a year later. Continuing with her singing in the UK, Olivia recorded her first solo album in 1971. She moved to the US in 1975 and between 1974 and 1976 had 10 hit singles including her signature song 'I Honestly Love You'.

Olivia gathered many awards for her music, but it was when she played Sandy (hence the clue) in 'Grease' opposite John Travolta in 1978 that she became a household name. 'Grease' was the No. 1 box office hit for that year and the soundtrack album spent 12 weeks at No. 1. In 1979, Queen Elizabeth II presented Olivia with an OBE.

Olivia continued producing hits including 'Physical', 'Magic' and 'Xanadu' until she had a baby girl - Chloe - in 1986. After this she dedicated herself to motherhood and setting up and running a fashion store chain, Koala Blue. In 1992, just as Olivia was staging a career comeback, she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Olivia beat the cancer and continued with her singing career, as well as becoming a fierce advocate for breast cancer awareness. In 2013, her cancer returned and again she fought it. In 2017 it returned again, this time in her spine. Despite another monumental fight, in July 2022, Olivia sadly passed away from the disease, aged 73. She was surrounded by family including her husband, John Easterling, and her daughter, Chloe Lattanzi.

Her family, who held a private funeral for Olivia at her ranch in Southern California, were also offered a state funeral by the Australian government in recognition of Olivia's contributions to music and charity. Her ashes, per her wishes, were spread at her ranch in California and also at Byron Bay, Australia.
6. Who am I? I was born in 1923 in Manhattan and died age 82 in 2005. My plaque has a depiction of me holding my shoe. ('Would you believe' there was absolutely no chaos at my funeral?)

Answer: Don Adams

Don Adams was born Don Yarmy to a Hungarian father and a German/Irish mother. He left school early to become a theatre usher. In 1941 he joined the marines and fought in the Battle of Guadalcanal before coming down with Blackwater fever. He spent the next year in a New Zealand hospital before returning to the forces as a drill instructor in the Corps.

In 1945, the war now over, Don began a career as a stand-up comic. In 1947 he married Adelaide Adams, and even though they divorced in 1960, he took the surname of Adams, so he would come higher up the list alphabetically when he had auditions.

Though Don was an actor, comedian and director, he was perhaps best-known for his role as Maxwell Smart in the series 'Get Smart.' This series, which primarily ran from 1965-1970, saw Don as the bumbling, but still lovable Agent 86 who co-starred with Agent 99 played by the leggy Barbara Feldon. Maxwell was reknowned for his catchphrase 'Would you believe...' as well as fighting the evil 'Kaos' (hence the clues). Don won three consecutive Emmys for best comedy actor for his role as Maxwell Smart (1967-1969).

Don married three times and fathered seven children. One of these, Cecily, sadly died at the age of 46 of lung cancer in 2004. Cecily's death reportedly affected Don greatly and his own health began to decline. He died in 2005 from from a lung infection while also battling lymphoma and trying to recuperate from a broken hip.

Prior to his death Don had joked that he didn't want a big, mournful funeral, he just wanted a few of his close friends to get together... and try to bring him back to life. Don had a funeral mass held for him at the Church of the Good Shepherd in Beverly Hills, which Barbara Feldon attended. He was then interred in Hollywood Forever Cemetery, where a stone angel sits over him. A bronze plaque sits underneath the angel with an inscription, as well as a relief of Don holding his shoe-phone to his ear.

I don't know about anyone else, but 60-odd years later, I still love watching 'Get Smart'.
7. Who am I? A woman full of grace and elegance, I was born in Belgium in 1929, and I died in 1993, just 3 months after I was diagnosed with cancer. I was buried near my home in Tolochenaz, Switzerland. (Hopefully the mourners 'go lightly' on the tears when they remember me.)

Answer: Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn was born 'Audrey Kathleen Ruston' to a Dutch noble family in 1929. She was born in Belgium, but due to her father's job, as a young child she travelled frequently between London, The Hague and Brussels. During WWII, Audrey was living in The Netherlands, where she helped the resistance by holding underground concerts, delivering underground newspapers and even helping downed airmen on the odd occasion. During the Dutch Famine of 1944, Audrey, like millions of others, was forced to eat ground up tulip bulbs as a source of carbohydrates just to survive. This caused malnutrition, which accounted, in part, to Audrey's tiny figure.

In 1948 Audrey moved to London after receiving a ballet scholarship, however, realising that, because of her weak constitution and lack of height, she would never make a prima ballerina, she took up acting instead. Audrey's fame came about in 1951, after Audrey was discovered by Sidonie Colette, the author of 'Gigi'.
After getting acclaim for her role in the play 'Gigi', Audrey went on to star in such classics as 'A Roman Holiday', 'Breakfast at Tiffanys' (she played the role of Holly Golightly in it, hence the clue), 'Sabrine' and 'My Fair Lady'. From 1968, Audrey spent much of her time bringing up her two children, and in the 80s and early 90s she worked tirelessly all over the world on humanitarian projects with UNICEF.

Audrey had just returned from Somalia to her home in Switzerland in 1992 when she began experiencing acute abdominal pain.
She was shortly afterwards diagnosed with colon cancer. On hearing her diagnosis, she reportedly looked out the window and said, 'how disappointing'. (So very Audrey.) Although Audrey had chemotherapy and surgery, she sadly died, age 63, in January 1993 at her home.

Audrey's funeral was held at a village church in Tolochenaz, Switzerland. It was attended by her long-term partner Robert Wolders, Hubert de Givenchy (her favourite fashion designer and long-time friend), her children, and many members of UNICEF. Her coffin was then interred in the tiny village graveyard across from Audrey's sprawling 19th century house. Her plot is simple and unassuming - a white stone cross with the words 'Audrey Hepburn 1929 - 1993'.

In 1994 Audrey became the fifth person person to receive an EGOT (Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony award winner) and the first person ever to win it posthumously. After her death she won the Grammy for Best Spoken Word Album for Children (1994), and an Emmy for 'Gardens of the World with Audrey Hepburn' (1993).
8. Who am I? A singer, I am one of four brothers. I was born on The Isle of Man in 1949 and died in London in 2012. I was buried opposite my home in Oxfordshire, UK. (I'm sure all my mourners thought my death was a terrible 'tragedy.')

Answer: Robin Gibb CBE

Robin Hugh Gibb and his twin brother, Maurice Gibb, were born three days before Christmas in 1949. Robin was both a solo singer and songwriter, as well as being part of the famous trio, the 'Bee Gees,' together with two of his brothers, Maurice and Barry. The family moved to Queensland, Australia when Robin was nine and it was here the brothers formed the 'Bee Gees'. The group enjoyed mild success in Australia, but it was when they moved back to the UK in 1967 that their career took off. 'I Started a Joke', written by Robin and released in 1968, topped the charts in five countries.

During the 70s the Bee Gees became one of the biggest disco bands in the world. Their hits included 'Stayin' Alive', 'Jive Talking', 'Night Fever', 'How Deep is Your Love', 'More Than a Woman' and 'Tragedy' (hence the clue). In all, they had nine singles that reached No. 1, which, according to Billboard Hot 100 in 2012, put them in third place for 'most No. 1 hits in history' (after 'The Beatles' and 'The Supremes').

Sadly, two of the Gibbs brothers died relatively young. Andy died at 30, with heart problems (his heart was weakened by cocaine use) and Maurice was 53 when he died of complications of a twisted intestine. Robin, unfortunately, did not fare much better. He started feeling severe abdominal pains in 2011 and was diagnosed with colorectal cancer. In 2012 he caught pneumonia and lapsed into a coma. Though he came out of the coma after a week, his cancer had advanced and he died in May 2012, aged 62. His son, Robin-John Gibb, who was at Robin's side when he died, took out his mobile shortly after Robin's death and found the song 'I Started a Joke'. The song has the line 'I finally died, which started the whole world living...' and Robin-John placed his phone on his father's chest as this line played, and then sat with his dad and cried like a baby. This beautiful song was also played at Robin's funeral.

The funeral was held in St Mary's church in Oxfordshire. Robin's coffin was glass-sided, topped with red roses and on a horse-drawn carriage. Sir Tim Rice and Robin's brother, Barry, were among the many mourners. Robin was then buried in the courtyard of St Mary's, which is opposite the home he and his wife of 19 years, Dwina, lived in.

Robin was inducted into the Songwriter's Hall of Fame in L.A. in 1994, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997. He was made a CBE (Commander of the Order of the British Empire) in 2002, (along with Maurice and Barry) for their 'valuable service and honour to Britain'.
9. Who am I? A proflic writer, I was born in the UK in 1812 and I died suddenly, aged 58, in 1870. In honour of my life's works, I was buried in Westminster Abbey. (I wonder if people had 'great expectations' for my funeral?)

Answer: Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens was born in Portsmouth, England in 1812. He was born into a hugely impoverished family who were forced to move several times due to debtors chasing money owed to them. In 1824, the family's debts caught up with them and John Dickens, Charles' father, was imprisoned, along with Charles' mother. Charles went to live with a friend of the family and, to earn his keep, worked at a shoe polish factory. (Many of the characters in Charles' books were based on the people he encountered during these rather wretched years).

Charles started writing when he took on work as a journalist and parliamentary reporter whilst working at a law office. He wrote his first novel, 'The Pickwick Papers', when he was just 24, which was hugely successful. From there Charles went on to write such classics as 'A Christmas Carol' (which has never been out of print since it was first published in 1843), 'Great Expectations' (hence the clue), 'Oliver Twist', 'A Tale of Two Cities' and 'David Copperfield', amongst others. Unlike many historical figures, Charles was regarded as a genius while he was still alive. In fact, it has been said that at the time, Charles Dickens was not only Britain's greatest writer, but he was also Britain's biggest celebrity.

His sudden death at age 58 from a stroke while he was walking in to have his dinner, came as a shock to both the UK and America, where he also held celebrity status. While his death was a shock (probably even to him as he apparently thought he had a toothache), he had prepared for his funeral and had a list of instructions as to how it should proceed. Despite his fame, he wanted it to be inexpensive and unostentatious and he wanted to be buried in a small churchyard, near his country home in Kent.

He did, in fact, get a small funeral with 14 mourners, but the English media (amongst others) weren't going to allow one of the greatest literary figures of the Victorian era to get away with being buried in a small graveyard anywhere. (Queen Victoria even sent condolences to Charles' estranged wife, Catherine, such was his fame). Charles therefore had his funeral, albeit with only 14 mourners and no pomp or ceremony, in 'Poets Corner' in Westminster Abbey, where he joined the likes of Geoffrey Chaucer, Samuel Johnson, George Frederick Handel & Rudyard Kipling.
10. Who am I? I was born in Edinburgh in 1930 and once worked as a coffin polisher. I died on Lyford Cay, the Bahamas, in 2020. Some of my ashes were spread over St Andrews Golf Course. (I do hope the mourners at my funeral were 'stirred' and not just 'shaken'!)

Answer: Sir Sean Connery

Tommy 'Sean' Connery was born in Edinburgh in 1930. His father was a lorry driver/factory worker, his mother a cleaner, and money was tight: the apartment the family lived in had no hot water and Sean slept in a bottom drawer of a chest of drawers. Sean left school early and had many jobs as a youth, including working as a milkman, a lorry driver, a labourer, and a coffin polisher. At age 16, he did a three-year stint in the Royal Navy before being medically discharged because of a duodenal ulcer.

A keen footballer and body builder, Sean had the choice, at age 23, of becoming either a professional footballer or an actor, and he settled on acting. Sean chose wisely - he appeared in, or starred in, over 60 movies during his lifetime. Sean's best known role of course was as the suave secret agent, James Bond. The first actor to play '007', the creator, Ian Fleming wasn't a fan of Sean at first - until, that is, he saw Sean in action. At this point, Fleming was so keen, he actually incorporated some of the elements of Sean's life into the 'Bond' movies. Sean was a hit with the general public and ended up starring in seven of Fleming's movies. Many maintain he was the original and best Bond.

Outside of being '007', Sean won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in the 'Untouchables', was fabulous in 'The Hunt For Red October', and was in other noteworthy movies such as 'Murder on the Orient Express', 'Marnie', 'Entrapment', 'Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade', 'Highlander' and 'The Name of the Rose'.

In 2000, at age 69, Sean was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II, with Sean stating that it was one of the proudest days of his life.

Sean was 90 when he died peacefully from heart failure at his home in the Bahamas. As expected at such an age, he had been unwell for some time and had suffered from dementia for several months. He was surrounded by family, including his wife of 45 years, Micheline Roquebrune.

The family had a private cremation ceremony in the Bahamas and this is where some of his ashes were scattered. However, Sean, a very keen golfer, also requested that the remainder of his ashes be scattered over St Andrews Golf Course in his country of birth, Scotland.
Source: Author heatherlois

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor skunkee before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Most Recent Scores
Today : Andyboy2021: 10/10
Today : Guest 107: 10/10
Today : loriannie: 8/10
Today : Guest 76: 10/10
Today : Guest 172: 10/10
Nov 26 2022 : poetkah: 10/10
Nov 25 2022 : stevroll: 8/10
Nov 25 2022 : Guest 98: 10/10
Nov 25 2022 : wjames: 9/10

11/27/2022, Copyright 2022 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us