Quiz about Celebrity Leapers People Born on February 29
Quiz about Celebrity Leapers People Born on February 29

Celebrity "Leapers": People Born on February 29 Quiz


How would you like to have a birthday only once every four years (in "leap year")? Well, that's what happens if you are born on February 29. People born on this date are known as "leapers". Some of them are quite well known...here are ten.

A multiple-choice quiz by paulmallon. Estimated time: 7 mins.
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Author
paulmallon
Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
349,613
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
307
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Singer, actress, TV hostess Dinah Shore was born Francis Rose Shore, February 29, 1916. She developed polio at age two, but overcame it to become one of the most popular radio singers of the 1940s. She became even more popular in the '50s on TV, but saved her biggest coup for her last TV hosting gig, "A Conversation with Dinah" (1989-1992). On it she got the first post-White House interview with which former first lady? Hint

Pat Nixon
Betty Ford
Nancy Reagan
Lady Bird Johnson

2. Tony Robbins was born February 29, 1960, in the Golden State of California. His writings have appeared in magazines such as GQ, Time, Business Week and Newsweek. He has also appeared on multiple network and cable TV shows and stations. For over 30 years he has earned a very good living as an author and speaker. For what type of speaking and writing is he best known? Hint

Motivational
Biographical
Historical
Biblical

3. Did you ever hear of Johnny Leonard Martin? I didn't think so as he is better known by his sobriquet "Pepper" Martin, the great baseball star of "The Gashouse Gang", the St. Louis Cardinals of the mid-1930s. That team had greats like Paul and Dizzy Dean, Joe "Ducky" Medwick and their fiery player/manager Frankie Frish. By what other nickname was Pepper Martin known? Hint

The People's Choice
Old Reliable
The Wild Horse of the Osage
The Whip

4. John Holland is not a name or face many people would recognize. Nonetheless, he did change the face of warfare with a major invention. Before becoming an engineer, he was a teaching member of The Christian Brothers, but illness caused him to leave the order in 1873. He then started work as an engineer and eventually developed the first submarine to be commissioned by the Royal Navy and the U.S. Navy. Where was this talented inventor born? Hint

America
Ireland
England
The Netherlands

5. Gretchen Christopher, born in 1940, was the founder of The Fleetwoods, one of the most popular singing groups of the 1950s and 60s. She and two of her Olympia (WA) H.S. schoolmates, Barbara Ellis (a fellow cheerleader) and Gary Troxel, comprised the trio that began performing in 1958. The original name of the group had been Two Gals and a Guy.
Success was not long in coming when in 1959 they had two songs that both hit the number one spot on the Billboard Hot 100 List. "Come Softly to Me" was the first. What was the second?
Hint

Goodnight My Love
Mr. Blue
Tragedy
Graduation's Here

6. Are you ready to hear some great jazz, dixieland or big band music? Well, I have just the right guy for you. His name is Jimmy Dorsey, one of the most popular musicians and bandleaders from the 1930s-1950s. He was born in 1904, and as early as 1913 was playing trumpet in public. He is half of the famous Dorsey Brothers Orchestra. What is the name of his younger swingin' sibling? Hint

Timmy
Tommy
Johnny
Bobby

7. Let's leave America's "Roaring '20s" and travel back a few hundred years to the time of the Italian Renaissance. On February 29, 1468 a man (actually a baby) named Alessandro Farnese was born. On October 13, 1534 he would become the 220th Pope of the Catholic Church. His Papacy would last until November 10, 1549. Which of the following statements about him is NOT true? Hint

He established The Council of Trent.
He had a mistress named Silvia.
He was the father of four children.
He succeeded Pope Julius III.

8. On February 29, 1936 a child named Alexander Petricone Jr. entered the world in Cambridge MA. He would grow up to become a most versatile actor known as Alex Rocco. He is best known for his portrayal of Moe Greene in the 1972 movie blockbuster "The Godfather". Although he never won an Oscar, he did win an Emmy for his work on the small screen. What was the show for which he earned that award? Hint

Murphy Brown
The Family Guy
Home Improvement
The Famous Teddy Z

9. One of the classiest players of his time, Henri Richard (born in 1936), was a National Hockey League (NHL) center for 20 years. His career ran from 1955-1975 and in that time he was instrumental in leading his team to 11, count them, 11 NHL Stanley Cup Championships. In 1966 his overtime goal won the Cup for his squad. For which franchise did he play his entire career? Hint

Toronto Maple Leafs
Chicago Black Hawks
Detroit Red Wings
Montreal Canadiens

10. Dorris Alexander Brown was a noted historian and author. Better known as Dee Brown, he grew up in Little Rock, AR during The Great Depression and would go on to write about the great repression of the American Indian in his most famous work. "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" (1971) describes the massacre of a group of the Lakota-Sioux tribe. In what state did the "battle" take place? Hint

South Dakota
Montana
North Dakota
Wyoming


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Singer, actress, TV hostess Dinah Shore was born Francis Rose Shore, February 29, 1916. She developed polio at age two, but overcame it to become one of the most popular radio singers of the 1940s. She became even more popular in the '50s on TV, but saved her biggest coup for her last TV hosting gig, "A Conversation with Dinah" (1989-1992). On it she got the first post-White House interview with which former first lady?

Answer: Nancy Reagan

After graduating from Vanderbilt University, Shore headed for The Big Apple. She landed a job singing on WNEW, along with folks including Frank Sinatra and later joined bandleader Xavier Cugat's show. She was married to actor George Montgomery from 1943-1962 and had a 1970s fling with actor Burt Reynolds. During WWII she entertained the troops in Britain and France, sometimes escorted by General George Patton himself. She recorded over 85 songs, four of which were number one hits. They were "I'll Walk Alone" (1944), "The Gypsy" (1946), "The Anniversary Song" (1947) and "Buttons and Bows" (1948) which was numero uno for 10 weeks. She made numerous albums, a couple of handfuls of movies and hosted TV shows for decades. She won nine Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe. A longtime player and supporter of golf she even hosted a tournament on the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) tour. In 1994 she was made an honorary member of the LPGA Hall of Fame.
Dinah also has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Interesting fact: When TV Guide named their All-Time Top 50 TV Stars list, Dinah came in at number 16.
2. Tony Robbins was born February 29, 1960, in the Golden State of California. His writings have appeared in magazines such as GQ, Time, Business Week and Newsweek. He has also appeared on multiple network and cable TV shows and stations. For over 30 years he has earned a very good living as an author and speaker. For what type of speaking and writing is he best known?

Answer: Motivational

He is what some would call a "life coach", believing very much in the power of positive thinking and acting. For over 30 years he has traveled the globe, giving weekend seminars. It is estimated that between his books, tapes, infomercials, seminars and speeches to various business groups, his message has been heard in over 100 countries by close to 30 million people. In 1994 President Bill Clinton invited him to come and visit with him at Camp David in MD. His books include "Unlimited Power" (1989) and "Awaken the Giant Within" (1991). He has even had time to appear in a couple of movies including "Shallow Hal" (2001) with Gwyneth Paltrow.

Interesting fact: Talk about earning a good living, Forbes magazine estimated that his income from all sources in just the year 1987 was $30 million bucks.
3. Did you ever hear of Johnny Leonard Martin? I didn't think so as he is better known by his sobriquet "Pepper" Martin, the great baseball star of "The Gashouse Gang", the St. Louis Cardinals of the mid-1930s. That team had greats like Paul and Dizzy Dean, Joe "Ducky" Medwick and their fiery player/manager Frankie Frish. By what other nickname was Pepper Martin known?

Answer: The Wild Horse of the Osage

Born on you know when in 1904, he got the name because of the way he played the game. He ran the bases with total reckless abandon, often diving headfirst into the bags. He was more than just peppery, the man could seriously play. In a 13 year career, spent entirely with the Cards, he compiled a .298 batting average, hitting over .300 seven times, and he stole 146 bases. He led the league three times in swiped sacks (1933-1934-1936). He was a four time All-Star and was named the 1931 Male Athlete of the Year by the Associated Press. He was a two time World Series champion (1931 and 1934) and his career Series batting average of .418 has held up as the best for over 75 years.

Interesting fact: When the first All Star game was played at Chicago's Comisky Park on July 6, 1933, Pepper Martin became the National League's first starting third baseman. (The All-Star game was the idea of Chicago Tribune sportswriter Arch Ward.)
4. John Holland is not a name or face many people would recognize. Nonetheless, he did change the face of warfare with a major invention. Before becoming an engineer, he was a teaching member of The Christian Brothers, but illness caused him to leave the order in 1873. He then started work as an engineer and eventually developed the first submarine to be commissioned by the Royal Navy and the U.S. Navy. Where was this talented inventor born?

Answer: Ireland

He "leaped" to life in Ireland in 1840, where he stayed until 1873. When he first hit the U.S. he started work as an engineer, before taking up teaching at St. John's Catholic school in N.J. for six years. With financial backing from an Irish group known as The Fenians, he was able to quit his teaching gig and get back to spending full time working on "submersible vessels". After much trial, tribulation and nixed proposals, on April 11, 1900 the U.S. Navy purchased his first ship. The 53 foot long "U.S.S. Holland" was commissioned October 12, 1900. The Navy wound up buying seven subs in all. The British Royal Navy developed a group of Holland type subs shortly thereafter. John Phillip Holland died August 12, 1914 in Newark, N.J.

Interesting fact: Ironically, the first five subs in the Japanese Navy were modified versions of The Holland, although 10 feet longer at 63 feet.
5. Gretchen Christopher, born in 1940, was the founder of The Fleetwoods, one of the most popular singing groups of the 1950s and 60s. She and two of her Olympia (WA) H.S. schoolmates, Barbara Ellis (a fellow cheerleader) and Gary Troxel, comprised the trio that began performing in 1958. The original name of the group had been Two Gals and a Guy. Success was not long in coming when in 1959 they had two songs that both hit the number one spot on the Billboard Hot 100 List. "Come Softly to Me" was the first. What was the second?

Answer: Mr. Blue

"Come Softly..." (the original title) hit number one in April and "Mr. Blue" made it to the top in November. The following year Dick Clark presented Gretchen's group with their only two Gold Records. Their first national TV appearance had been on Clark's "American Bandstand", March 14, 1959. Gretchen was the lead vocalist and composer of many of the groups songs. Their last hit as a trio came in 1963 with "Goodnight My Love". The group disbanded that year and Gretchen began a solo career as "Gretchen Christopher of the Fleetwoods", and she later performed with Bob Hope on one of his many USO Tours.

Interesting fact: In her fifth decade as a performer, Gretchen recorded her first solo CD album, "Sweet Sixteen" in 2007.
6. Are you ready to hear some great jazz, dixieland or big band music? Well, I have just the right guy for you. His name is Jimmy Dorsey, one of the most popular musicians and bandleaders from the 1930s-1950s. He was born in 1904, and as early as 1913 was playing trumpet in public. He is half of the famous Dorsey Brothers Orchestra. What is the name of his younger swingin' sibling?

Answer: Tommy

Tommy was known as "The Sentimental Gentleman of Swing". They started playing together in the Roaring '20s with a band they called Dorsey's Novelty Six. Jimmy split from Tommy in the mid-30s and started the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra, with the popular Helen O'Connell as his lead vocalist. Her rendition of "Brazil" from back in the days with the band, entered the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2009. As a musician, Jimmy played a mean sax and trumpet and he could liven things up with his clarinet too. As a composer he created "I'm Glad There Is You" (1941) and "It's the Dreamer In Me" (1938). The brothers re-united in 1953.
Jimmy's 1956 recording of "So Rare" earned him a Gold Record. He is a member of both The Big Band Hall of Fame and The American Jazz Hall of Fame. He even appeared in a few movies including "Shall We Dance?" (1937), with Fred and Ginger and "The Fleet's In" (1942), with Dorothy Lamour. Jimmy Dorsey died June 12, 1957.

Interesting fact: A young female singer who performed for a while with Jimmy in 1944 named Patti Palmer, would later become the first to say "I do" to comedian Jerry Lewis.
7. Let's leave America's "Roaring '20s" and travel back a few hundred years to the time of the Italian Renaissance. On February 29, 1468 a man (actually a baby) named Alessandro Farnese was born. On October 13, 1534 he would become the 220th Pope of the Catholic Church. His Papacy would last until November 10, 1549. Which of the following statements about him is NOT true?

Answer: He succeeded Pope Julius III.

He succeeded Pope Clement VII. His mistress was named Sylvia Ruffini and she bore him three sons and a daughter, all before he became Pope. He had attained the title of Cardinal of the Catholic Church in 1493. Pope Paul III did indeed establish The Council of Trent, primarily with the intention of refuting the attacks of the Protestant Reformation, led by Marin Luther and John Calvin. Paul III died November 10, 1549 and was succeeded by Pope Julius III.

Interesting fact: The Council of Trent would last for 25 sessions over 18 years, under the terms of three different Popes, Paul III, Julius III and Pius IV.
8. On February 29, 1936 a child named Alexander Petricone Jr. entered the world in Cambridge MA. He would grow up to become a most versatile actor known as Alex Rocco. He is best known for his portrayal of Moe Greene in the 1972 movie blockbuster "The Godfather". Although he never won an Oscar, he did win an Emmy for his work on the small screen. What was the show for which he earned that award?

Answer: The Famous Teddy Z

He won it for his role of Hollywood agent Al Floss.
In "The Godfather" (1972) he played Moe Greene, a mobster based on Bugsy Siegel, a member of the Vito Genovese crime syndicate in real life, who was the mob's front man in starting up Las Vegas. In one of the more memorable scenes from that (or any) film he is killed compliments of a bullet in the eye. Not so coincidentally that's the same way Bugsy actually got it as well (1947). After a rough and tumble youth in MA, Alex followed Horace Greeley's advice and the young man went west, taking a job tending bar for a while. He later came under the tutelage of Leonard Nimoy, a fellow Baystater who gave him acting lessons. He would go on to make over 30 films, including "Get Shorty" (1995), "That Thing You Do" (1996) and "The Wedding Planner" (2001). He also appeared on dozens of TV shows, including "That Girl"(1970), "Murphy Brown" (1989) and "Home Improvement" (1997).

Interesting fact: While "The Famous Teddy Z" opened to good reviews, even receiving two Primetime Emmy Award nominations, it didn't last long. After a strong debut on September 18 1989, poor ratings caused it to be cancelled in the second season on May 12, 1980, with five episodes already shot, still in the can.
9. One of the classiest players of his time, Henri Richard (born in 1936), was a National Hockey League (NHL) center for 20 years. His career ran from 1955-1975 and in that time he was instrumental in leading his team to 11, count them, 11 NHL Stanley Cup Championships. In 1966 his overtime goal won the Cup for his squad. For which franchise did he play his entire career?

Answer: Montreal Canadiens

He was the brother and teammate of the great Maurice "The Rocket" Richard. In fact Henri, who was three inches shorter than his bro, was nicknamed "The Pocket Rocket". His career scoring totals included 358 goals (with a high of 30 in 1959-60), 688 assists (with a high of 52 in 1957-58) and 1,046 points (with a high of 80 in 1957-58). He twice led the league in assists (1957-58 and 1962-63). In addition he scored 49 Stanley Cup playoff goals. He was listed at number 29 on the 1998 List of The 100 Greatest Players by the bible of the NHL, The Hockey News. The uniform number 16 that he wore with pride for two decades was retired by the Canadiens on December 10, 1975.

Interesting fact: When he retired he had played more games in a Montreal Canadiens uniform than any other player.
10. Dorris Alexander Brown was a noted historian and author. Better known as Dee Brown, he grew up in Little Rock, AR during The Great Depression and would go on to write about the great repression of the American Indian in his most famous work. "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" (1971) describes the massacre of a group of the Lakota-Sioux tribe. In what state did the "battle" take place?

Answer: South Dakota

The South Dakota land ran red with the blood of between 150-300 Sioux men, women and children who were killed and over 50 others who were wounded. In addition, more than two dozen of the 7th Cavalry troops met their maker on that fateful day of December 12, 1890. Twenty cavalry troops were awarded The Medal of Honor for their part in the slaughter.

Brown was born in 1908 and worked as a reporter before college. After Graduate School at George Washington University he served from 1934-1942 as librarian for the U.S. Agriculture Department. He wrote over 30 books of both fiction and nonfiction. Many of his works dealt with the (mis)treatment of the Native American tribes and it was assumed by many readers of the time that he himself was an Indian. He died December 12, 2002.

Interesting fact: The site of what has become known as "The Wounded Knee Massacre" was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.
Source: Author paulmallon

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