FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about The Merchant of Jerusalem
Quiz about The Merchant of Jerusalem

The Merchant of Jerusalem Trivia Quiz


You are a Jewish merchant trading in New Testament Judea and surrounds. Do you have the expert knowledge to lead your trade caravan to success - and safety? Caution: requires general knowledge as well as Bible geography! Strongly Advised: Use a map!

A multiple-choice quiz by Rimrunner. Estimated time: 8 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Religion Trivia
  6. »
  7. The Bible
  8. »
  9. Geography of the Bible

Author
Rimrunner
Time
8 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
329,674
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
9 / 15
Plays
206
Question 1 of 15
1. You land at Tyre with a load of wine and pottery from Greece. After selling these you reinvest in luxury goods for Caesarea and Tiberias: purple fabrics, fine linen and embroidery, all from Damascus in Syria. Your planned route is Tyre - Caesarea - Nazareth - Tiberias. You intend to hire a camel train, which can do up to 20 miles per day. How long (in travel time, not counting trading stops) will this journey take you? Hint


Question 2 of 15
2. You have to travel from Caesarea, via Nazareth, to Tiberias. What river, which flows more or less west into the Mediterranean, will you have to cross in the Valley of Jezreel? (This was also the setting of the battle against King Jabin of the Canaanites and Sisera his general, which was led by Deborah and Barak, as recorded in Judges). Hint


Question 3 of 15
3. As a merchant just arrived in Tiberias, a newly built and carefully planned Roman city, where will you most likely set up your shop? Hint


Question 4 of 15
4. In Tiberias you, a Jewish merchant, acquire a load of camphor balm and dried fish, which you plan to sell in Jerusalem. You plan to take the main Roman road south, via Nazareth and Sychar. With a lighter load this time, you will hire a train of pack donkeys, which can travel about 15 miles per day. Given that it is Friday today, and that Jerusalem is about 75 miles away, on what day next week do you expect to reach Jerusalem? Hint


Question 5 of 15
5. Having spent two days resting in Jerusalem, you plan to take a short side trip down to Jericho to see whether you can pick up some bargains in amber and bronze ware. What special precaution might you need to take for this trip (bearing in mind the parable Jesus told in Luke 10:29-37)? Hint


Question 6 of 15
6. You found some great bargains in amber jewelery and bronze vases in Jericho, down in the valley of the Jordan which flows into the Dead Sea. Now you have to transport them all the way back up to Jerusalem, which lies at an altitude of around 2500 feet above sea level. What is the closest estimate of how high you will have to climb from Jericho to Jerusalem? Hint


Question 7 of 15
7. From Jerusalem you are heading south and west, towards Gaza on the main route from Egypt. You hope to get some good deals in gold and gemstones, which travel this way from mines in Africa. This time you have no goods to transport, so you decide to save money and walk. How long will it take you to walk to Gaza, a distance of about 45 miles? Hint


Question 8 of 15
8. In Gaza you find you need to consider a sea voyage north back to Tyre. The weather and winds are favourable, so a cargo ship might do 4.5 knots - call it 5 miles per hour. Sailing during daylight hours only, how many days should the voyage take from Gaza to Tyre? Hint


Question 9 of 15
9. From Gaza you decide instead to return to Jerusalem, but via Beersheba, where you will look for top quality fleeces. Since you will have to move cross-country, through the desert, you will need a camel train and a company of guards. In total you have 20 camels and 10 people for this trip. You expect the first stage of the journey, from Gaza to Beersheba, to take at least two days. Camels are famous for their endurance without water, but in fact no one would ordinarily require their camels to do this without very good reason: like most animals, they would lose condition rapidly, and would only recover very slowly afterwards. As a guide for those who are unfamiliar with animal husbandry, a dairy cow might need, say, 150 litres of water per day. It is high summer, and very hot, and the camels will be heavily laden. How much water should you carry with you? Hint


Question 10 of 15
10. From Beersheba you plan to travel to Hebron. What kind of slopes will you traverse? Hint


Question 11 of 15
11. You hear that a new winery has opened at Hebron, and is highly recommended. You decide to make a stop there. The wine is excellent, and you buy a dozen 100-litre casks. How many additional camels do you need to hire to carry this wine to Jerusalem? (Donkeys, or mules, can reasonably carry around 160 pounds of dead weight; Camels are a lot bigger and stronger.) Hint


Question 12 of 15
12. Arriving at Jerusalem from Hebron in the time of Jesus, through which gate would you ordinarily enter the city? (NB: As an experienced merchant, you will know that you have to go through the city centre before you get to the Temple...) Hint


Question 13 of 15
13. Entering Jerusalem, you are stopped by a Roman patrol, who want to search your baggage and your goods for weapons; the Zealots are restless. Finding nothing, they still insist on confiscating one of your casks of wine. To whom, or to what office, should you properly direct your complaint? Hint


Question 14 of 15
14. While in Jerusalem, you realise that the whole city is abuzz about a wandering preacher, Jesus from Nazareth. It so happens that you see him arguing with some Pharisees about the Temple. Can you remember what it was that he told them, as recorded in John 2:19-22? Hint


Question 15 of 15
15. You are setting up shop outside the Temple when you see a crowd go by; you hear that they are taking Jesus of Nazareth to be crucified. According to Matthew 27, verses 45 and 51 in the NIV Bible, what prevented you from doing business as usual on this day? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. You land at Tyre with a load of wine and pottery from Greece. After selling these you reinvest in luxury goods for Caesarea and Tiberias: purple fabrics, fine linen and embroidery, all from Damascus in Syria. Your planned route is Tyre - Caesarea - Nazareth - Tiberias. You intend to hire a camel train, which can do up to 20 miles per day. How long (in travel time, not counting trading stops) will this journey take you?

Answer: About 5 days

This is not the most direct route, but keeps to the relative safety of the main Roman roads, which were patrolled to keep banditry down. Many merchants would have travelled via Caesarea (the Judean Governors' seat of choice) because of additional trade opportunities there.

The described route goes south along the coast to Caesarea, and then north-east inland to Tiberias. The total distance is approximately 100 miles.
2. You have to travel from Caesarea, via Nazareth, to Tiberias. What river, which flows more or less west into the Mediterranean, will you have to cross in the Valley of Jezreel? (This was also the setting of the battle against King Jabin of the Canaanites and Sisera his general, which was led by Deborah and Barak, as recorded in Judges).

Answer: River Kishon

The River Kishon flows into the Mediterranean through the Valley of Jezreel, below the ridge of mountains which run from Megiddo to Mt. Carmel, near the coast. From Caesarea you first climb this mountainous ridge, then plunge steeply down to the Jezreel Valley. Once across the river and the valley floor, you'll start a steady climb through hilly country up to Nazareth, and then downhill once again to Tiberias, on the near shore of the Sea of Galilee. You do not approach the Jordan until after Tiberias; the Kidron is near Jerusalem, and the Jabbok flows into the Jordan on its east (inland) bank.
3. As a merchant just arrived in Tiberias, a newly built and carefully planned Roman city, where will you most likely set up your shop?

Answer: In one of the market squares

As a brand new, Roman-designed city, Tiberias came provided with several dedicated market squares included from the urban planning stage. Both permanent and itinerant merchants would have used these squares as their primary market sites, usually grouped according to merchandise. While some traders would have been present at the city gates, these would have been minor traders; something like the street hawkers we see today.

The forum was a place for public assembly and debate rather than for trade.
In some older cities certain streets tended to accumulate craftsmen and merchants in a given trade (such as goldsmiths, or tanners); in Tiberias there had not been enough time for this to happen, especially in light of the fact that commerce was well provided for.
4. In Tiberias you, a Jewish merchant, acquire a load of camphor balm and dried fish, which you plan to sell in Jerusalem. You plan to take the main Roman road south, via Nazareth and Sychar. With a lighter load this time, you will hire a train of pack donkeys, which can travel about 15 miles per day. Given that it is Friday today, and that Jerusalem is about 75 miles away, on what day next week do you expect to reach Jerusalem?

Answer: Thursday, at sunset

I just reminded you - you're a JEWISH merchant. You will observe the Sabbath, which begins on Friday evening, and ends at sunset on Saturday. In other words, you are not going to leave until Sunday morning, and you will only arrive in Jerusalem after five days of travel: on Thursday, around sunset.
5. Having spent two days resting in Jerusalem, you plan to take a short side trip down to Jericho to see whether you can pick up some bargains in amber and bronze ware. What special precaution might you need to take for this trip (bearing in mind the parable Jesus told in Luke 10:29-37)?

Answer: Hire extra guards against the chance of robbers

I'm assuming there was a good reason Jesus chose this route to illustrate His parable of the Samaritan whom we call 'Good'. But to be safe, I gave you the reference!
Jericho is down in the Jordan valley, and has adequate water.
It is a long way from Samaria, and in any case Samaritans spoke the same language as orthodox Jews.
The 'permit from the Roman governor' is a bit of plausible nonsense.
6. You found some great bargains in amber jewelery and bronze vases in Jericho, down in the valley of the Jordan which flows into the Dead Sea. Now you have to transport them all the way back up to Jerusalem, which lies at an altitude of around 2500 feet above sea level. What is the closest estimate of how high you will have to climb from Jericho to Jerusalem?

Answer: About 3 500 feet

Heights are approximated, since the cities range considerably from lowest to highest point within each city. The main issue is that Jericho lies considerably below sea level, and that therefore the climb from Jericho to Jerusalem is greater than Jerusalem's height above sea level. Jericho's actual altitude is around 850 - 1000 feet below sea level.
7. From Jerusalem you are heading south and west, towards Gaza on the main route from Egypt. You hope to get some good deals in gold and gemstones, which travel this way from mines in Africa. This time you have no goods to transport, so you decide to save money and walk. How long will it take you to walk to Gaza, a distance of about 45 miles?

Answer: About three days

Since most of us are quite unused to walking these distances, it is quite difficult for us to tell how long it will take. Since the distance is about 45 miles, generally downhill, and a typical walking distance per day around 15 miles, perhaps a little more, the answer should be around three days,
perhaps a little less - but no one in those days would normally have travelled other than in daylight, and a little time is always needed to make camp - there were no motels to check into!
8. In Gaza you find you need to consider a sea voyage north back to Tyre. The weather and winds are favourable, so a cargo ship might do 4.5 knots - call it 5 miles per hour. Sailing during daylight hours only, how many days should the voyage take from Gaza to Tyre?

Answer: Three days

A ship on this route would often have had a favourable wind (on the beam), whether on-shore or off-shore, for most of the trip. From Gaza to Joppa (about 45 miles), and from Joppa to Caesarea (about 35 miles), would each have taken less than a day, but it would have been normal practice to go into harbour for the night, where a harbour was available.

The third leg would have been a full day's sailing, even with a favourable wind, since it is just about sixty miles, or twelve hours' sailing, from Caesarea to Tyre. Thus three days altogether. Notice how much faster sailing is than any sort of travel overland. No wonder St. Paul favoured taking a ship when he had to travel far!
9. From Gaza you decide instead to return to Jerusalem, but via Beersheba, where you will look for top quality fleeces. Since you will have to move cross-country, through the desert, you will need a camel train and a company of guards. In total you have 20 camels and 10 people for this trip. You expect the first stage of the journey, from Gaza to Beersheba, to take at least two days. Camels are famous for their endurance without water, but in fact no one would ordinarily require their camels to do this without very good reason: like most animals, they would lose condition rapidly, and would only recover very slowly afterwards. As a guide for those who are unfamiliar with animal husbandry, a dairy cow might need, say, 150 litres of water per day. It is high summer, and very hot, and the camels will be heavily laden. How much water should you carry with you?

Answer: About 8 000 litres

In Genesis 24 we read how Rachel watered the camels of Abraham's steward, who came looking for a wife for Isaac. Did you ever realise how hard she worked to do this? Camels - particularly under the specified conditions of heavy loading and hot weather - need up to 200 litres of water per day. (A thirsty camel can consume over 100 litres within 10 minutes!) A merchant - like the Ishmaelites who carried Joseph down to Egypt (Genesis 37:25-28) - would have needed to plan carefully for projected water consumption over a dry stretch. So 20 camels; 200 litres each; for 2 days = 8 000 litres.

The humans' water requirements are negligible in comparison.
10. From Beersheba you plan to travel to Hebron. What kind of slopes will you traverse?

Answer: Mostly uphill

In terms of altitude, Beersheba is pretty much down near the plain of the Negev desert. Hebron is pretty much on top of a mountain, or at least on top of the ridge of a mountain chain. So from Beersheba to Hebron the slope goes, on average, uphill all the way.
11. You hear that a new winery has opened at Hebron, and is highly recommended. You decide to make a stop there. The wine is excellent, and you buy a dozen 100-litre casks. How many additional camels do you need to hire to carry this wine to Jerusalem? (Donkeys, or mules, can reasonably carry around 160 pounds of dead weight; Camels are a lot bigger and stronger.)

Answer: 6

I hope you didn't answer '1' - poor camel!
When the Queen of Sheba came to visit King Solomon, she chose camels to bear, amongst other things, 'gold in abundance' (2 Chronicles 9:1, NKJV) - not the lightest of loads! Why? Because a camel can carry up to around 500 pounds, compared to a donkey or mule which, on average, can be usefully loaded up to around 160 pounds. Since a 100-litre cask would weigh something over 200 pounds, a practical load could well mean one 100-litre cask on each side, nicely balanced. 12 casks, therefore 6 camels needed.
12. Arriving at Jerusalem from Hebron in the time of Jesus, through which gate would you ordinarily enter the city? (NB: As an experienced merchant, you will know that you have to go through the city centre before you get to the Temple...)

Answer: Gennath / Jaffa Gate (West)

This is not as straightforward as it seems.
Naturally, since (of course!) you know Hebron is south of Jerusalem, you'll approach the city from the south.
But did you remember that the Hinnom valley runs across Jerusalem's south side, deepening to the east? And that, therefore, the Hebron/Bethelehem road actually came up to Jerusalem on the western side - and led in through the Jaffa Gate?
The road out of the southern gate actually went down past Bethany into the Jordan Valley. While there was a link road down from the Hebron road to the valley road, the most direct and level route from Hebron took the western route into Jerusalem.
13. Entering Jerusalem, you are stopped by a Roman patrol, who want to search your baggage and your goods for weapons; the Zealots are restless. Finding nothing, they still insist on confiscating one of your casks of wine. To whom, or to what office, should you properly direct your complaint?

Answer: To the Sanhedrin, at the Temple

Tricky question, isn't it? I actually believe the best advice is to keep your mouth shut and stay out of trouble, but felt that this option would have been too tempting as a possible answer!
In fact, day-to-day administration, and therefore complaints about administration, were the responsibility of the High Priest and the Sanhedrin.
Pontius Pilate was the senior Roman presence, but he would not normally have had anything to do with routine civil matters.
Herod Antipas was Tetrarch of Galilee and Perea (the latter lying to the east of the Jordan river), and actually had no authority in Jerusalem.
King Agrippa I, who did have nominal rule over Judea and Jerusalem at this time, would not have been much help, being absent from Judea.
14. While in Jerusalem, you realise that the whole city is abuzz about a wandering preacher, Jesus from Nazareth. It so happens that you see him arguing with some Pharisees about the Temple. Can you remember what it was that he told them, as recorded in John 2:19-22?

Answer: That if the Temple was destroyed, he would rebuild it within three days.

According to John 2:21-22, while Jesus did say that He would rebuild the Temple within three days, His disciples came to understand that He was using it as a metaphor for His death and resurrection within three days.
The Romans did destroy the Temple, in 70 AD, but Jesus did not predict that they would be responsible.
There is no indication whatsoever that Jesus ever suggested going back to the tented Tabernacle model, or that He thought that village synagogues were a better way forward. These suggestions were purely mischievous.
15. You are setting up shop outside the Temple when you see a crowd go by; you hear that they are taking Jesus of Nazareth to be crucified. According to Matthew 27, verses 45 and 51 in the NIV Bible, what prevented you from doing business as usual on this day?

Answer: There was darkness for three hours, and a great earthquake.

There is no record of any official close of business (apart from the usual preparations for the Sabbath, which was beginning at sunset) or of a curfew (at this time). There is no record of any riot or looting at this time either.
There never was any "Great Fire of Jerusalem", as an event by itself. (London, yes; Rome, yes; Chicago, yes; Jerusalem, no.)
According to the Biblical records (in particular, Matthew 27), there was darkness from noon until 3 p.m.; (some have suggested that this was caused by a solar eclipse, others attribute it to direct divine intervention) and that, when Jesus died, there was such a great earthquake that it split rocks and threw the recently buried out of their graves, some coming back to life.
Certainly, it was a memorable occasion.
Source: Author Rimrunner

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor LeoDaVinci before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
7/22/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us