Quiz about A Taste of Tercentenary
Quiz about A Taste of Tercentenary

A Taste of Tercentenary Trivia Quiz


To celebrate my 300th quiz, I invited ten well-known people to a special tercentenary dinner party to experience the food and drink that has shaped British cuisine over the last 300 years.

A photo quiz by Plodd. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
Plodd
Time
5 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
381,285
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
593
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 161 (8/10), ccvlfb (9/10), Guest 90 (8/10).
photo quiz
1. The first guest to arrive for my dinner party was the writer Jonathan Swift. He would have dined on fricassee, or a ragout during the 18th century and may even have partaken in my choice of dessert of the period. A classic French dish simply consisting of cold custard and meringue. It had a name which I found appropriate since he wrote about Laputa in his book "Gulliver's Travels". What is the dessert called? Hint

Glubbdubdrib
Lemuel's gruel
Lil' Lillipudding
Floating Island

photo quiz
2. My next guest at the dinner table was a distinguished gentleman who was also from the 18th century, the highly esteemed Prime Minister, William Pitt the Younger. He had travelled all night after introducing a new law in Parliament called the Commutation Act. Which related beverage did I offer him to quench his thirst? Hint

Tea
Guinness
Coffee
Rum

photo quiz
3. "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of"...ahem...a good cook! Which of these foods would Jane Austen NOT have served up to Mr Fitzwilliam Darcy in the late 18th century at his Pemberley stately home? Hint

Flummery
Black butter
Collops
Banoffee pie

photo quiz
4. Mr Sake Dean Mahomed spoke very fine English when he emigrated to England from India in 1810. He explained during our dinner conversation about the time he opened Britain's first Indian restaurant, setting the precedence for other curry houses and introducing the British to undeniably spicy Asian cuisine. What was the name of this restaurant? Hint

Mother India's Cafe
The Little India Lounge
The Balti Club
Hindoostane Coffee House

photo quiz
5. Charles Dickens was an amusing guest at the dinner table and had us in stitches when he read an excerpt from one of his books. "Hallo! A great deal of steam! The pudding was out of the copper. A smell like a washing-day! That was the cloth. A smell like an eating-house and a pastry cook's next door to each other, with a laundress's next door to that! That was the pudding." Which classic British pudding was being described? Hint

Eton mess
Christmas pudding
Trifle
Knickerbocker glory

photo quiz
6. I cordially invited the genteel Mrs Elizabeth Beeton to my dinner party in celebration of my tercentenary as I needed her assistance in creating ratafias to accompany our after dinner drinks. Ratafia was one of the recipes taken from her 1861 published "Book of Household Management", but what were they? Hint

Thin mints
Almond biscuits
Brandy snaps
Gingerbread

photo quiz
7. I doubt if Queen Victoria would have eaten this ice cream treat but she may not have been amused when they banned this product from the streets of London. Street vendors sold these all over the place, but the 'elf & safety' police soon put a stop to that, me old mucker! Which ice cream was banned in 1899? Hint

Screwball
Granny's teeth
Kelly-in-a-Coffin
Penny lick

photo quiz
8. My next guest was Winston Churchill. He sustained energy "in his finest hour" by fine dining, drinking wine and smoking cigars. His cook at Chartwell House was an experimental chef, even though war rations put a stop to certain delicacies, she used everything she could get her hands on and used all parts of an animal to cook with. One of the recipes she served was Cervelles Connaught, but what was this awful, I mean offal, dish better known as? Hint

Duck livers on toast with a whisky cream sauce
Curried brains
Kidneys in sherry
Pickled pork tongue

photo quiz
9. The confectioner John Cadbury refused dessert but accepted a warming cup of hot chocolate as we finished dinner. He was a sweet man but was horrified to learn that seventy years after his death in 1889, his company started advertising a brand new product using martian robots on a new-fangled talking box called a television. Which food product was this? Hint

Angel Delight
Smash
Arctic Roll
Dream Topping

photo quiz
10. All my guests enjoyed their evening and took up my offer of staying the night. Even my final guest, Heston Blumenthal, offered to cook us breakfast in the morning; the same food that he sent to British astronaut Tim Peake on the International Space Station in 2016. Which dish is on our menu ? Hint

Bubble & squeak
Kipper kedgeree
Bacon sarnie
Full English breakfast


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The first guest to arrive for my dinner party was the writer Jonathan Swift. He would have dined on fricassee, or a ragout during the 18th century and may even have partaken in my choice of dessert of the period. A classic French dish simply consisting of cold custard and meringue. It had a name which I found appropriate since he wrote about Laputa in his book "Gulliver's Travels". What is the dessert called?

Answer: Floating Island

The third part of the 1726 book, "Gulliver's Travels", told of Laputa, a floating island in the sky visited by Lemuel Gulliver. Jonathan Swift made mention of fricassee and ragout in his 1729 satirical essay, "A Modest Proposal". It said "I have been assured by a very knowing American of my acquaintance in London, that a young healthy child, well nursed, is at a year old, a most delicious, nourishing, and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked, or boiled; and I make no doubt that it will equally serve in a fricassee, or a ragout." An 18th century fricassee was meat or veal stewed and accompanied by a sauce. A ragout was again a stewed meat dish but highly seasoned.

A Floating Island (Ile Flottante) is soft and very easily digestible after a large meal. It is simply made by mixing egg whites with sugar and vanilla, then softly poaching. This is then placed in a sea of creamy vanilla custard and served ice cold. Modern varieties are served with a drizzle of caramel. The classic French dessert often saw itself on British fine dining tables of the 18th century to finish off a rich and decadent meal. Other alternatives of this dish are known as "oeufs a la neige" which translates as "eggs in snow".
2. My next guest at the dinner table was a distinguished gentleman who was also from the 18th century, the highly esteemed Prime Minister, William Pitt the Younger. He had travelled all night after introducing a new law in Parliament called the Commutation Act. Which related beverage did I offer him to quench his thirst?

Answer: Tea

William Pitt the Younger was British prime minister twice, firstly between 1783 to 1801, and then 1804 until his death in 1806. He introduced the Commutation Act in 1784 which marked a turning point in the British tea trade. Just before the Act came to fruition, the British were obtaining seven million lbs in weight each year illegally, compared to just five million purchased through legal import.

Tea was a very expensive commodity and the monopoly of imports by the East India Company and high taxation kept the prices hiked up. People were not able to buy tea any cheaper so they resorted to illegal means, including large scale smuggling. The high taxation on tea also led to the events of the Boston Tea Party. Such was the scale of illegal trade that servants of the rich in their large country houses were drying and re-selling used tea for their own profit. This is possibly where the Cockney slang "tea leaf" (thief) originated. The Commutation Act brought smuggling to a stop almost overnight by reducing taxes from 119 percent to just 12.5.
3. "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of"...ahem...a good cook! Which of these foods would Jane Austen NOT have served up to Mr Fitzwilliam Darcy in the late 18th century at his Pemberley stately home?

Answer: Banoffee pie

A flummery was a soft dessert pudding of the 17th to 19th century, usually made with soaked oatmeal, cream, and orange juice or rosewater for flavour. Collops were slices of meat served during the 18th century. Also eaten in the 18th century was black butter; a fruit conserve, made by boiling cider apples over a low heat until a thick pulp and then adding sugar, lemon, spices and liquorice. Banoffee Pie was not invented until 1971.

Jane Austen made reference to many food recipes in her letters and novels. In 1798, she wrote to her sister Cassandra, "I always take care to provide such things as please my own appetite, which I consider as the chief merit in housekeeping". Recipes that she recorded included pigeon pie, cold souse (brawn), pease soup, pickled cucumber, Bath Olivers, New College pudding (steamed pudding) and marmalade, all of which were suitable for dining in a clergyman's household. If she had met Mr Darcy at Netherfield Ball, they may have enjoyed a reel before drinking a glass of negus (mulled wine) while taking a turn around the room.
4. Mr Sake Dean Mahomed spoke very fine English when he emigrated to England from India in 1810. He explained during our dinner conversation about the time he opened Britain's first Indian restaurant, setting the precedence for other curry houses and introducing the British to undeniably spicy Asian cuisine. What was the name of this restaurant?

Answer: Hindoostane Coffee House

Curry had already been introduced to British cuisine by the time Sake Dean Mahomed opened the Hindoostane Coffee House. The eatery was located in George Street near Portman Square in London with a target clientele of British people returning home from India, as well as Indian aristocracy visiting England. An excerpt from the London Times newspaper on 27th March, 1811, read "Mahomed, East-Indian, informs the nobility and gentry, he has fitted up the above house, neatly and elegantly, for the entertainment of Indian gentlemen, where they may enjoy the hookah, with real chilam tobacco, and Indian dishes, in the highest perfection, and allowed by the greatest epicures to be unequalled to any curries ever made in England with choice wines, and every accommodation". An article in the The Epicure's Almanack wrote "All the dishes were dressed with curry powder, rice, cayenne and the best spices of Arabia". Unfortunately, Mahomed became bankrupt in 1812 and had to close the restaurant down.

His legacy lived on as curry is one of Britain's favourite food and in close contention to the nation's favourite dish, fish and chips. Between 2012 to 2015, there were approximately 9,500 Indian restaurants in the UK with the most popular dish being Chicken Tikka Masala.
5. Charles Dickens was an amusing guest at the dinner table and had us in stitches when he read an excerpt from one of his books. "Hallo! A great deal of steam! The pudding was out of the copper. A smell like a washing-day! That was the cloth. A smell like an eating-house and a pastry cook's next door to each other, with a laundress's next door to that! That was the pudding." Which classic British pudding was being described?

Answer: Christmas pudding

Eton mess, trifle and knickerbocker glory are all cold deserts, but Christmas pudding is the only steamed pudding out of the choices listed. The first reference to steamed pudding was made in "The English Huswife", written by Gervase Markham and published in 1615. The pudding mixture used to be sealed in a piece of animal intestine or stomach but then muslin cloth became available in England from the latter part of the 17th century. Suet was added from the start of the 18th century which led to the introduction of British classics, spotted dick, Christmas pudding, treacle pudding, jam roly-poly and steak and kidney pudding.

The excerpt from Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol" described Mrs Cratchit's attempt at making a steamed suet Christmas pudding. She would have made a thick mixture using flour, suet, bread crumbs, sugar, dried fruit, eggs, milk and spices, then put this in a sealed muslin cloth and placed in boiling water in a copper pot for five to six hours. Once completed, Mrs Cratchit proudly took the pudding through to the their table in front of the fire, the rounded dessert ablaze with ignited brandy and dressed with a sprig of holly on top. "Oh, a wonderful pudding! Bob Cratchit said, and calmly too, that he regarded it as the greatest success achieved by Mrs Cratchit since their marriage".
6. I cordially invited the genteel Mrs Elizabeth Beeton to my dinner party in celebration of my tercentenary as I needed her assistance in creating ratafias to accompany our after dinner drinks. Ratafia was one of the recipes taken from her 1861 published "Book of Household Management", but what were they?

Answer: Almond biscuits

The earliest recipe for ratafia biscuits was recorded in 1818 in the William Kitchiner book, "The Cook's Oracle". It included the text, "Take eight ounces of apricot-kernels, or, if they cannot be had, bitter-almonds will do as well, blanch them and beat them very fine with a little orange-flower water, mix them with the whites of three eggs well beaten, put to them two pounds of single refin'd sugar finely beaten and sifted; work all together, and t'will be like a paste; then lay it in little round bits on tin-plates flour'd, let them in the oven that is not too hot, and they will puff up, and be soon baked".

Over 45 years later, the great British food writer, Isabella Mary Beeton, published her "Book of Household Management" which included ratafia and other recipes such as carrot jam, pie with tench and eels, eggs a la tripe, and marrow dumplings. She also gave advice on how to alleviate croup, clean butter churns and described the role of the domestic servant.

Another popular biscuit of the time were Bath Olivers, with over a million sold at the Great Exhibition of 1851. The next forty years saw the introduction of more British favourites; Garibaldi (1861) and the cream cracker (1885). The digestive was invented in 1892. It's such a shame that we had to wait nearly another century for the Hobnob!
7. I doubt if Queen Victoria would have eaten this ice cream treat but she may not have been amused when they banned this product from the streets of London. Street vendors sold these all over the place, but the 'elf & safety' police soon put a stop to that, me old mucker! Which ice cream was banned in 1899?

Answer: Penny lick

Ice cream was first served in England at a banquet inside Windsor Castle in 1671, but it was so exotic that it was only served on the royal table while the guests looked on. Affluent people caught on and built ice houses on their estates and the sweet treat soon extended to becoming more available to the working classes. Street vendors began selling ice cream from bicycle and cart.

During her 63 year reign, Queen Victoria saw many changes to British food and the way people ate, including the introduction of silver service and fine dining etiquette. She would have been horrified if she saw street urchins queuing outside ice cream vendors trying to buy a penny lick. At the cost of a penny, the vendor would put a very small serving of ice cream in a glass bowl. The glass was thickened so it appeared there was more ice cream than was actually served. One lick and it was gone! The glass would then be passed back to the vendor where it was sometimes wiped clean for the next person. This unhygienic practice contributed towards the spreading of many diseases. Penny licks were banned in 1899 but people had to wait another five years before the ice cream cone was invented and introduced at the St. Louis World's fair.
8. My next guest was Winston Churchill. He sustained energy "in his finest hour" by fine dining, drinking wine and smoking cigars. His cook at Chartwell House was an experimental chef, even though war rations put a stop to certain delicacies, she used everything she could get her hands on and used all parts of an animal to cook with. One of the recipes she served was Cervelles Connaught, but what was this awful, I mean offal, dish better known as?

Answer: Curried brains

Churchill is well remembered for his wartime speeches, but he can also lay claim to the quote, "It is well to remember that the stomach governs the world". He was served throughout the war, at Downing Street and Chartwell, by cook Georgina Landemare. It was her way of contributing towards the war effort, and she had extensive knowledge in cooking as her husband was chef at the Ritz Hotel in London. Churchill's love of food is well documented and his favourite dishes were Stilton cheese, roast beef and Yorkshire pud, and black cherry jam for breakfast. He disliked sauerkraut, corned beef, marmalade, pickled onions and black pudding.

In 1958, Georgina Landemare published a book, "Churchill's Cookbook", which included some of his favourite wartime recipes. These included Boodles orange fool, jugged hare, tournedos, creme doria, and mousse de jambon froid (cold ham mousse). He also enjoyed Indian curry and this would have included Cervelles Connaught; lamb brains cooked in a spicy sauce.
9. The confectioner John Cadbury refused dessert but accepted a warming cup of hot chocolate as we finished dinner. He was a sweet man but was horrified to learn that seventy years after his death in 1889, his company started advertising a brand new product using martian robots on a new-fangled talking box called a television. Which food product was this?

Answer: Smash

The 1970s brought the blandness of browns and creams to British fashion, furniture and food. The introduction of ready-meals had taken off and more houses were being equipped with colour televisions, and by 1971, approximately 69 percent of the population owned a fridge. This meant they could easily store pre-packaged food from manufacturers including Vesta, Findus, Wall's and Bird's Eye.

Cadbury's were already an established confectioner but they introduced their instant mashed potato product in the 1960s. Smash became popular during the 1970s with the introduction of the "Smash martian" advert, a lovable group of aliens who laughed at the stupid humans as they prepared potatoes the hard way instead of using instant granules and hot water. In 2015, the Independent newspaper voted it the 3rd best advert of all time, followed closely in front by Compare the Meerkats and the Cadbury's Gorilla ad.
10. All my guests enjoyed their evening and took up my offer of staying the night. Even my final guest, Heston Blumenthal, offered to cook us breakfast in the morning; the same food that he sent to British astronaut Tim Peake on the International Space Station in 2016. Which dish is on our menu ?

Answer: Bacon sarnie

John Montagu was credited with inventing the sandwich in the 1700s and it has been a favourite now for approximately 300 years. Waking up to the smell of frying bacon gives off similar endorphins as eating chocolate or falling in love. Fresh rashers melting the butter smeared between two slices of bread, and not forgetting a dollop of brown sauce or tomato ketchup. A perfect breakfast staple to start off our day.

John Glenn was the first American to eat in space, and in 1962, he was able to squirt apple sauce from a tube directly into his mouth in zero gravity. Pouches containing scrambled eggs and turkey in gravy soon followed and tortilla replaced the need for bread. Normal bread could not be used as the crumbs could float and clog up vital equipment. Herbs and spices are added to many servings as food tastes more bland in space. NASA has carried out an experiment called Veg-01 to grow lettuce in space from seed. This was successful and the first harvest was reaped in 2015.

It was two years in the making, but experimental chef Heston Blumenthal eventually put Britain on the intergalactic food map by creating....a space-age bacon sarnie! He had already met the British astronaut, Tim Peake, as well as working in partnership with the European Space Agency to follow their strict guidelines for preparing space food. Blumenthal's idea behind creating the food was to stimulate the tastebuds with memories of home comforts, 250 miles above the Earth. Also on the menu in pre-packaged containers were truffle and beef stew, red Thai curry with rice, and key lime pie; all of these were some of the astronaut's favourite food.
Source: Author Plodd

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
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