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Quiz about British vs American Usage
Quiz about British vs American Usage

British vs. American Usage Trivia Quiz


It is commonly said that England and the United States are two countries divided by a common language. This quiz compares American (i.e. U.S.) and British grammatical usage.

A multiple-choice quiz by skylarb. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
skylarb
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
179,428
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
2141
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. In which usage is the following sentence correct? He said that he had just read Frost's "The Road Not Taken". Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Have you read Frost's "The Road Not Taken"? In which usage is this correct? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. It was raining very hard, so Dick put his rubbers in his locker. He did not want his feet to get wet later. Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. "Have you got a radio?" In which usage is this form preferred over "Do you have a radio?" Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. I've gotten very good at taking tests. In which usage is the previous sentence correct? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. I went to the beach on the weekend. Is this correct in British usage?


Question 7 of 10
7. Take me to hospital now! In which usage is this correct? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. "Manchester United have bought a new player". In which usage is this correct? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. The crowd is going wild. In which usage is this correct? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. The children are spoilt. In which usage is this sentence most likely to occur? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In which usage is the following sentence correct? He said that he had just read Frost's "The Road Not Taken".

Answer: British

In the United States, commas and periods go inside of double quotation marks regardless of whether or not the punctuation is part of the quotation.
2. Have you read Frost's "The Road Not Taken"? In which usage is this correct?

Answer: Both

Although in American usage periods and commas go inside of double quotation marks, this is not true in the case of question marks or exclamation points after quoted titles. Illogically enough, however, in American usage, a period would go inside the quotation marks: I have read "The Road Not Taken."
3. It was raining very hard, so Dick put his rubbers in his locker. He did not want his feet to get wet later.

Answer: American

In British usage, a rubber is an eraser. In American usage, it can be a condom or the kind of rubber boots that slip over shoes to keep the feet dry. The phrase, "Dick put his rubbers in his locker," was actually found in an 8th grade American grammar text book, predictably sending the students into titters.
4. "Have you got a radio?" In which usage is this form preferred over "Do you have a radio?"

Answer: British

In both usages, both are correct, but in American usage, the "do you have" form is preferred over the "have you got" form.
5. I've gotten very good at taking tests. In which usage is the previous sentence correct?

Answer: American

The British do not use "gotten" for the past participle of "got." In British usage, this would read: I've got very good at taking tests.
6. I went to the beach on the weekend. Is this correct in British usage?

Answer: No

The British would say "at the weekend" rather than "on the weekend." It is considered acceptable for Americans to say "on the weekend," though they might more likely say "over the weekend."
7. Take me to hospital now! In which usage is this correct?

Answer: British

The American usage requires an article before hospital: Take me to the hospital now.
8. "Manchester United have bought a new player". In which usage is this correct?

Answer: British

In American usage, this would be treated as a singular: "Manchester United has bought a new player."
9. The crowd is going wild. In which usage is this correct?

Answer: Both

In British usage, the word "crowd" is also sometimes treated as a plural.
10. The children are spoilt. In which usage is this sentence most likely to occur?

Answer: British

Although technically correct in American usage as well, this sentence is most likely to occur in British usage. Americans would more likely say: The children are spoiled.
Source: Author skylarb

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor ILuv2Teach before going online.
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