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Quiz about Quotes by Composers
Quiz about Quotes by Composers

Quotes by Composers Trivia Quiz


To the left, a quote from a great composer, along with the dates they lived. To the right, the composer's name. Can you make the musical connections?

A matching quiz by reedy. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
reedy
Time
5 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
382,028
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
492
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. "Works of art make rules, but rules do not make works of art." (1862-1918)  
  Gustav Mahler
2. "Neither a lofty degree of intelligence nor imagination nor both together go to the making of genius. Love, love, love, that is the soul of genius." (1756-1791)  
  Aaron Copland
3. "To send light into the darkness of men's hearts - such is the duty of the artist." (1810-1856)  
  Johannes Brahms
4. "Don't bother looking at the view - I have already composed it." (1860-1911)  
  Johann Sebastian Bach
5. "Without craftsmanship, inspiration is a mere reed shaken in the wind." (1833-1897)  
  Igor Stravinsky
6. "My music is best understood by children and animals." (1882-1971)  
  Robert Schumann
7. "Sometimes I can only groan, and suffer, and pour out my despair at the piano!" (1810-1849)  
  Ludwig van Beethoven
8. "Music should strike fire from the heart of man, and bring tears from the eyes of woman." (1770-1827)  
  Claude Debussy
9. "So long as the human spirit thrives on this planet, music in some living form will accompany and sustain it and give it expressive meaning." (1900-1990)  
  Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
10. "The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul. If heed is not paid to this, it is not true music but a diabolical bawling and twanging." (1685-1750)  
  Frédéric Chopin





Select each answer

1. "Works of art make rules, but rules do not make works of art." (1862-1918)
2. "Neither a lofty degree of intelligence nor imagination nor both together go to the making of genius. Love, love, love, that is the soul of genius." (1756-1791)
3. "To send light into the darkness of men's hearts - such is the duty of the artist." (1810-1856)
4. "Don't bother looking at the view - I have already composed it." (1860-1911)
5. "Without craftsmanship, inspiration is a mere reed shaken in the wind." (1833-1897)
6. "My music is best understood by children and animals." (1882-1971)
7. "Sometimes I can only groan, and suffer, and pour out my despair at the piano!" (1810-1849)
8. "Music should strike fire from the heart of man, and bring tears from the eyes of woman." (1770-1827)
9. "So long as the human spirit thrives on this planet, music in some living form will accompany and sustain it and give it expressive meaning." (1900-1990)
10. "The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul. If heed is not paid to this, it is not true music but a diabolical bawling and twanging." (1685-1750)

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. "Works of art make rules, but rules do not make works of art." (1862-1918)

Answer: Claude Debussy

Claude Debussy (1862-1918) was a French composer who wrote in the Impressionist style, emphasizing mood and emotions in his music. He is considered to be one of the most influential composers of his time, and sadly died before his time, succumbing to cancer at the age of 55.

Amongst his most recognizable works is the "Suite bergamasque, for piano, L. 75", which contains "Clair de lune" and "Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune".
2. "Neither a lofty degree of intelligence nor imagination nor both together go to the making of genius. Love, love, love, that is the soul of genius." (1756-1791)

Answer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) was an Austrian child prodigy who was paraded around the courts of Europe by his father Leopold as a violinist as early as age four. He had an amazing impact on the Classical era of music, and really popularized the use of the newly-invented piano. His life was tragically cut short at the age of 35 from a fever epidemic (although some suggest he was poisoned).

Mozart has an amazing array of popularly-known compositions, although arguably his most famous work is "Eine kleine Nachtmusik" (Serenade No. 13 - 1787).
3. "To send light into the darkness of men's hearts - such is the duty of the artist." (1810-1856)

Answer: Robert Schumann

Robert Schumann (1810-1856) was a German composer, considered one of the greatest of the Romantic era. His original intent as a musician was to pursue a career as a virtuoso pianist, but a hand injury forced him to take a different path. In 1833, Schumann began to experience depression, and this disorder affected him for the rest of his life, at times to the point of attempted suicide. In 1854 he committed himself to an asylum; he died two years later.

Schumann wrote exclusively for the piano until 1840, but his work afterwards came to be more varied. He became known for his 'Lieder' (songs for voice and piano) in later years. Probably his most well-known work for solo piano is "Carnaval, Op. 9", written in 1833.
4. "Don't bother looking at the view - I have already composed it." (1860-1911)

Answer: Gustav Mahler

Gustav Mahler (1860-1911) was an Austrian composer who bridged the gap between the late Romantic era and the early 'contemporary' or 'modern' music of the 20th Century. Mahler worked largely as a conductor to earn a wage, and composed when he could. Much of his body of work was for large orchestras and symphonic choruses.

Mahler's most well-known symphony would be his "Symphony No. 5", composed in 1901/02, especially its third movement, "Adagietto". The symphony exceeds an hour in length.
5. "Without craftsmanship, inspiration is a mere reed shaken in the wind." (1833-1897)

Answer: Johannes Brahms

Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) was a German composer who wrote in the Romantic era, often premiering his own compositions as a virtuoso pianist. His popularity as a composer often groups him alongside Beethoven and Bach as 'The Three Bs'. Brahms adapted the freedom of Romantic composition within the structures of Baroque and Classical traditions, perhaps giving the reason behind his wide appeal.

Brahms wrote for many different instrumental and vocal ensembles, but one of his most successful works in his lifetime was the "Hungarian Dances" (1869) for piano duet, a collection of Roma songs which was performed all over the world.
6. "My music is best understood by children and animals." (1882-1971)

Answer: Igor Stravinsky

Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) was a Russian composer who was instrumental (pardon the pun) in establishing the stylistic diversity of 20th century music. His work greatly influenced his peers, and he blazed a trail in pushing the musical boundaries of previous eras.

Stravinsky created a number of well-known works, but (as a bassoonist) perhaps his most famous is "The Rite of Spring", a controversial ballet that premiered in 1913 (it nearly caused a riot).
7. "Sometimes I can only groan, and suffer, and pour out my despair at the piano!" (1810-1849)

Answer: Frédéric Chopin

Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist who wrote his compositions for the piano; if it wasn't for solo piano, it included piano as part of the composition. He wrote in many different styles, but much of his work is technically difficult, as it seems he wrote to challenge his own ability. His death at the age of 39 is believed to have been due to tuberculosis.

Chopin wrote in many different styles, but he is perhaps best known for his nocturnes (night music) and mazurkas, which are in their essence Polish dance music. That said, his "Ballade No. 4, Op. 52" is considered by many to be the epitome of Romantic solo piano music.
8. "Music should strike fire from the heart of man, and bring tears from the eyes of woman." (1770-1827)

Answer: Ludwig van Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) was a Germon composer who straddled the Classical and Romantic eras of Western musical tradition, and it is evident in the progression of his own compositions over the decades he was active. During his career he was not only known for his composition, but he was also a virtuoso pianist. Sadly, he suffered from hearing loss that began in his 20s, and during the last decade of his life he was almost completely deaf.

Beethoven's popular works are many and varied, but perhaps his most enduring is his "Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125", also known as "The Choral", which contains the ubiquitous "Ode to Joy".
9. "So long as the human spirit thrives on this planet, music in some living form will accompany and sustain it and give it expressive meaning." (1900-1990)

Answer: Aaron Copland

Aaron Copland (1900-1990) was an American 20th century composer who became known as 'The Dean of American Composers' for his exploration of American themes and his deliberately populist style. He became so commercially successful that by the time of his death he had become a multi-millionaire.

Amongst his best-known works is "Fanfare for the Common Man" (1942), which was inspired by a speech by Vice President Henry Wallace that spoke of the 'Century of the Common Man.'
10. "The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul. If heed is not paid to this, it is not true music but a diabolical bawling and twanging." (1685-1750)

Answer: Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) was a German composer that had such an influence on the Baroque style of music that the date of his death is often considered the end of the Baroque era. Bach wrote primarily for the church and was typically employed as an organist and Konzertmeister wherever he lived during his career (with some variations).

Amongst J.S. Bach's many works, probably his most recognizable are the "Brandenburg Concertos (BWV 1046-1051)", originally titled "Six Concerts à plusieurs instruments", published in 1721.
Source: Author reedy

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