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new question Where was country legend Keith Urban born?
    Keith Lionel Urbahn (now Urban) was born on October 26, 1967 in Whangarei, New Zealand. Whangarei is New Zealand's northernmost city and is the major population centre of the Northland province. It is about two hours' drive north of Auckland, the country's largest city and metropolitan district. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keith_Urban FWIW, this author lives in Whangarei. (psnz)
1 answer
Today by BigTriviaDawg
new question According to Guinness World Records, where and how long is the world's shortest street?
    Would you believe just over 2 meters? Ebenezer Place in Wick, Scotland. Despite only being 6.75 feet long, the street does have 1 address for a hotel that has one door on the street taking up most of it. Shaq could cover the whole street and stick out at both ends... [quote] Ebenezer Place originated in 1883, when 1 Ebenezer Place was constructed; the owner of the building was instructed to display a name on the shortest side of the hotel. It was officially declared a street in 1887. Ebenezer Place was only recognised by the Guinness Book of Records in 2006, after the owner of the Mackays Hotel building made an entrance into a new bistro. It replaced the previous record of 5.2 m (17 ft), held by Elgin Street, Bacup, England. [/quote] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebenezer_Place,_Wick (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
Today by psnz
new question How many Australian Prime Ministers died in office in the 20th century?
    Two to Three died in office: Joseph Lyons and John Curtin for sure. Harold Holt disappeared in December 1967 while swimming in the ocean. If he were still alive he would be 115 years old...so most likely dead! Joseph Lyons and John Curtin both died of heart attacks. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_prime_ministers_of_Australia (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
Today by psnz
new question What is unusual about the star system TYC 7037-89-1?
    Its gravitational complexity. [quote]A recently discovered and spectacular six-star system, TYC 7037-89-1, possesses a gravitational complexity worthy of Rube Goldberg. Three separate pairs of stars orbit each other in typical binary fashion. But two of these pairs also orbit one another. The third pair, at a greater distance, orbits the other two pairs – the stars in each binary eclipse each other in turn from our point of view.[/quote]https://science.nasa.gov/universe/stars/multiple-star-systems/ To better understand this star system, the link above has a diagram that makes things (slightly) easier to understand. (psnz)
1 answer
Today by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer Where do giant spiral siphonophore live and how long can one get?
    These animals live in very deep oceanic water: [quote]"Praya dubia," the giant siphonophore, lives in the mesopelagic zone to bathypelagic zone at 700 m (2,300 ft) to 1,000 m (3,300 ft) below sea level. It has been found off the coasts around the world, from Iceland in the North Atlantic to Chile in the South Pacific.[/quote]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Praya_dubia [quote]Giant siphonophores, like all siphonophores, are a collection of highly specialized working parts. Some parts catch prey, others digest food, some parts reproduce and others direct the action by swimming. This siphonophore is bioluminescent — it creates its own light. When it bumps against something, its stem glows with a bright blue light.[/quote]https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/animals/animals-a-to-z/giant-siphonophore These invertebrates can be up to 40m (130') in length, but are only about as thick as a broomstick handle. Their diet includes small crustaceans, fish larvae and small fishes. (psnz)
1 answer
May 25 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer In botany, what things might be described as "rugose"?
    Rough and wrinkled. Botanically it is particularly relevant to leaves like the one I have in the photo link below. [quote] Botany. rough and wrinkled: applied to leaves in which the reticulate venation is very prominent beneath, with corresponding creases on the upper side. [/quote] https://www.dictionary.com/browse/rugose https://www.pinterest.com/pin/159948224245778002/ (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 25 24 by psnz
trivia question answer What form of poisoning can result if the root vegetable cassava is not properly prepared?
    Cyanide poisoning can happen if cassava is not properly prepared. The process of soaking and cooking cassava reduces the amount of cyanogenic glycosides present in the root. [quote] Regularly consuming cyanogenic glycosides or eating them in high amounts increases the risk of cyanide poisoning. Cyanide poisoning is associated with impaired thyroid and nerve function, paralysis, organ damage, and even death. [/quote] https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/cassava (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 25 24 by psnz
trivia question answer What is unusual about Mount Wingen in New South Wales?
    It's on fire, and has been for about 6,000 years. Just beneath the surface is a coal seam which has been smouldering for that length of time. The rate of burning is about one metre of the seam per year. [quote]In its history, the seam has covered a total area of 6.5 km, making it the oldest continuous coal fire in the world.[/quote]https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/burning-mountain (psnz)
1 answer
May 25 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer Is there a link between numbers in Turkish and in Nahuatl?
    The linguist Georges Dumezil once said that the numbers 1 to 10 in Quechua and Turkish are related. Is there any truth in that? it was the numbers 1 to 6, and more work is needed to investigate it: "Less well known is a series of four articles published between 1954 and 1957 on the Quechua language. After a trip to Peru where Dumézil naturally took an interest in local languages, he noted a curious resemblance between the names of numbers one through six in Quechua and Turkish. Upon analyzing these similarities and developing formulas concerning their relations he revealed a range of vocabulary shared by Quechuan and Turkish. This research has yet to be followed up (chabenao1)
1 answer
May 19 24 by chabenao1
trivia question answer In what discipline is the Pritzker Prize awarded?
    The Pritzker Prize is the top award for a living architect and is considered by some to be the "Nobel Prize" for architects. Jay and Cindy Pritzker founded the prize to help draw public attention to the lifetime achievements of architects. A committee of 8 people across the field of architecture and art come together to select the winner each year. The first winner was selected in 1979 and winners have been selected from around the world. https://www.britannica.com/topic/Pritzker-Prize (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 24 24 by psnz
trivia question answer How many times would you have to fold a piece of paper to reach the moon?
    What did Douglas Adams claim was the meaning of life? 42! Turns out that 42 folds will get a wad of paper thick enough to reach the moon! That's assuming that it would be possible to find a piece of paper big enough, and that you have the strength to make those folds. [quote]If you could fold a piece of copier paper 27 times, it would be more than 13km thick. Mt Everest is just over 8.8km tall. Incredibly, 42 folds would make the wad as thick as the distance from the Earth to the Moon! That's 384,400km.[/quote]https://www.cleverlearning.co.uk/foldingPaper.php The above website offers an Excel workbook for download to help with the mathematics. It also discusses the very real point that the distance between the Earth and the Moon is not constant, but constantly changing. Ah, the power of doubling! (psnz)
1 answer
May 24 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer What construction material is the Janka hardness test used to assess?
    Janka developed a scale to measure how easy it is to dent wood used for construction. [quote] It measures the force required to embed an 11.28-millimeter-diameter (7?16 in) steel ball halfway into a sample of wood. (The diameter was chosen to produce a circle with an area of 100 square millimeters, or one square centimeter.) [/quote] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janka_hardness_test (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 24 24 by psnz
trivia question answer What toy did Ed Headrick help modernize?
    The Frisbee! It's also known as the flying disc or flying saucer. Headrick was also instrumental in the development of disc golf. At the American toy company Wham-O Inc., after an inauspicious start, Headrick became head of research and development. There, he redesigned the Frisbee that was originally created by Walter Frederick Morrison. Achievements of "Steady" Ed Headrick (1924-2002): [quote]* Inventor of the sport of Disc Golf * Inventor of the first disc golf basket, the Disc Pole Hole * Designed and Installed the first Disc Golf course * Inventor of the modern-day Frisbee * Founded: The International Frisbee Association (IFA) * Founded: Disc Golf Association (DGA) * Founded: Professional Disc Golf Association (PDGA) * Founded: Recreational Disc Golf Association (RDGA) * Established and organized the first World Frisbee Championships and the Junior World Frisbee Championships. * Established the first Disc Golf tournaments and a $50,000 landmark Frisbee Disc Golf Tournament in 1979. * Donated his trademark “Disc Golf” to the public domain and his life to the sport he loved[/quote]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Headrick (psnz)
1 answer
May 24 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer What would a sailor usually use a "ditty box" for?
    A ditty bag (box) is 19th century nautical slang. As the word evolved from county-to-country (dite, dittis), "ditty" and "ditto" mean double or two-by-two because a ditty bag contains at least two of everything to endure sailors' long durations at sea. https://victoriancollections.net.au/items/521602ef19403a17c4b9fb68 (SpyderFuzz)
2 answers
May 23 24 by psnz
trivia question answer Are the sports of fencing and track-cycling played on a "piste"?
    Fencing is fought on a "piste", which is the French term for the strip or area where the fight takes place. The piste is a long, narrow strip, 14 metres long and between 1.5 and 2 metres wide. Track cycling, on the other hand, does not take place on a "piste". Instead, it takes place on a velodrome. A velodrome is an arena with a banked oval track specially designed for cycling. The track surface is usually made of wood or synthetic materials and varies in length, with standard sizes being 250 metres, 333.33 metres or 400 metres. (wellenbrecher)
1 answer
May 23 24 by chabenao1
trivia question answer What were lictors in ancient Rome and why did they carry fasces?
    Lictors were bodyguards who protected Roman magistrates. The fasces they carried were a bundle of rods that also contained an axe. They used the fasces to bind the hands of criminals and also to carry out sentences. The following link also contains an alternate etymological explanation for the bodyguarding work carried out by lictors. https://www.livius.org/articles/concept/lictor/ (psnz)
1 answer
May 23 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer What would a sailor usually use a "ditty box" for?
    A small box a sailor would use to carry their personal items sort of like a wallet. The box might also have things like needles and thread or even soap (who knew they bathed out at sea?) These personal possessions were also sometimes called a ditty bag. The possible etymology is as a "commodity bag or box". https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ditty_box https://www.thenauticalartsworkshop.com/ditty-box.html (BigTriviaDawg)
2 answers
May 23 24 by psnz
trivia question answer How big is the Canadian location often regarded as the world's smallest desert?
    The Carcross desert is tiny at about 1 square mile! The surrounding mountains provide a rain shadow that limits the area to just 20 inches of rain in a year. The typical definition for a desert is 10 inches of rain or less per year. [quote] Carcross Desert is commonly referred to as a desert, but is actually a series of northern sand dunes. The area's climate is too humid to be considered a true desert. The sand was formed during the last glacial period, when large glacial lakes formed and deposited silt. When the lakes dried, the dunes were left behind. [/quote] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carcross_Desert (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 23 24 by psnz
trivia question answer What is the most venomous plant in Australia?
    It is called the gympie-gympie stinging tree. This piece of flora is regarded as one of the world's most venomous plants. [quote]"Dendrocnide moroides," commonly known in Australia as the stinging tree, stinging bush, or gympie-gympie, is a plant in the nettle family Urticaceae found in rainforest areas of Malesia and Australia. It is notorious for its extremely painful and long-lasting sting. Indeed, it is sometimes referred to as the suicide plant because its sting is so misery-inducing that it has been said to cause suicides. The common name gympie-gympie comes from the language of the indigenous Gubbi Gubbi people of south-eastern Queensland.[/quote]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendrocnide_moroides As a Kiwi (New Zealander), I'll just add that this country has it's own resident tree nettle, known in Maori as ongaonga. I've only come across this plant once in many years of backcountry hiking and it really is a nasty piece of work with its own set of anecdotal history, such as killing horses and other stock. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urtica_ferox (psnz)
1 answer
May 23 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer Drake was the 1st Englishman to circumnavigate the globe. Who was the 2nd?
    A shame how ordinary people are forgotten. The second Englishman to circumnavigate the globe would have been one of Drake's crew, also the third, fourth, etc. (Southendboy)
2 answers
May 20 24 by chabenao1
trivia question answer Whereabouts in the home might one find a finial?
    The finial is the apex that is sometimes seen on a roof. However, in most homes, a finial is more often found on a bed-headboard or possibly on a curtain rod. A finial could also be on a fence or maybe above the front door. The shape is often tapered maybe like a pawn chess piece. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finial (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 22 24 by psnz
trivia question answer How does the tiger beetle avoid getting eaten by bats?
    Tiger beetles are able to produce ultrasounds, which they use to confuse the bats' echolocations. This has been termed "anti-bat sonar." [quote]...tiger beetles — big-eyed, long-legged insects with pincer-like jaws — produce their own ultrasound in response to a bat's ultrasound. The beetles, ... do it to trick their predators into thinking they're toxic, allowing them to fly away, unharmed.[/quote]https://www.npr.org/2024/05/22/1252096177/tiger-beetles-ultrasound-hungry-bats-echolocation-mimicry (psnz)
1 answer
May 22 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer In 2021, which American rapper opened the pasta restaurant "Mom's Spaghetti" in his hometown?
    Eminem! The name "Mom's Spaghetti" comes from his song "Lose Yourself." The Song was part of the climax of Eminem's film 8-Mile and has become one of his most popular songs. The restaurant was opened on 29 September 2021. Might be worth a try on my next visit to Detroit... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mom%27s_Spaghetti (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 22 24 by psnz
trivia question answer How did 10,000 Roman soldiers do against 230,000 Celtic tribesmen during the Boudican revolt?
    The Romans had a decisive victory. [quote]The Boudican revolt was an armed uprising by native Celtic Britons against the Roman Empire during the Roman conquest of Britain. It took place circa AD 60–61 in the Roman province of Britain, and was led by Boudica, the Queen of the Iceni tribe. The uprising was motivated by the Romans' failure to honour an agreement they had made with Boudica's husband, Prasutagus, regarding the succession of his kingdom upon his death, and by the brutal mistreatment of Boudica and her daughters by the occupying Romans.[/quote]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boudican_revolt [quote]The Romans advanced in a wedge-shaped formation, cutting through the rebel lines in hand-to-hand combat, their cavalry on the wings. Roman archers proved ineffective. The Britons became caught in the narrow defile and could not use their long swords.[/quote]https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/classics/warwickclassicsnetwork/romancoventry/resources/boudica/defeat/ [quote]Although heavily outnumbered, the Roman army led by Gaius Suetonius Paulinus decisively defeated the allied tribes in a final battle which inflicted heavy losses on the Britons.[/quote]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boudican_revolt Casualty statistics from the Boudican revolt make sobering reading. The Romans lost some 400 soldiers against an estimated 80,000 from the Iceni and other Celtic Britons. Add into that somewhere between 70,000 and 80,000 civilian deaths and this was a defeat on a massive scale. (psnz)
1 answer
May 22 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer Who named Australia?
    The name Australia is derived from the Latin word australis, which means 'southern'. This word, australis, was first used nearly two thousand years ago in the name of an imaginary land called Terra Australis Incognito-the Unknown Southern Land. The first recorded use of the word Australia was by the Portuguese explorer Pedro Fernandes de Queirós in 1606. The Dutch seafarer Abel Tasman charted the coast in 1644 and called the place New Holland. The name New Holland was in common usage for the southern land until the mid-1850s. When the British first established a settlement in 1788 they claimed all the land up to 135th meridian east longitude and named it New South Wales. The rest was still called New Holland. In 1803 the English explorer Matthew Flinders was the first to circumnavigate and map the entire continent. He suggested that the whole continent by called Australia. Finally, in 1824, the British Admiralty agreed that the continent should be officially called Australia. The official name for the country of Australia is the Commonwealth of Australia. The original names for Australia Australia included Terra Australis, New South Wales and New Holland. These old names were dropped in 1824. https://trishansoz.com/trishansoz/australia/how-did-australia-get-its-name.html#google_vignette (pehinhota)
1 answer
May 22 24 by odo5435
trivia question answer What is a pineberry and what does it taste like?
    A pineberry does not come from a pine tree but rather is a white strawberry! The "pine" part of the name comes from the subtle pineapple flavor the berries have. [quote] Pineberry is a hybrid cross from Fragaria chiloensis and Fragaria virginiana. A pineberry is smaller than a common strawberry, measuring between 15 and 23 mm (0.6 and 0.9 in). When ripe, it is almost completely white, but with red achenes (the seeds). The plant is disease-resistant, and highly priced, although not profitable due to small-scale farming, small berry size and low yield. [/quote] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pineberry (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 21 24 by psnz
trivia question answer Who was the first player to score a double-century in ODI? How many balls did it take?
    The little master, India's Sachin Tendulkar. His 200 took just 147 deliveries, with 25 boundaries and three sixes. South Africa were the opposition in a day/night match played on 24 February, 2010 at Gawalior in India. The ODI (One Day International) cricket format is played over two innings of 50 six-ball overs (300 deliveries). Each bowler is limited to delivering 10 overs. The side with the most runs wins. From their 50 overs, the Indian batsmen compiled a daunting 401 runs for the loss of just three wickets. Tendulkar was left not out on 200. In reply, the South Africans were bowled out for 248 in 42.5 overs. India won by 153 runs. https://www.espncricinfo.com/records/most-runs-in-an-innings-216972 https://www.espncricinfo.com/series/south-africa-tour-of-india-2009-10-428634/india-vs-south-africa-2nd-odi-441828/full-scorecard (psnz)
1 answer
May 21 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer Which US president held the first White House press conference?
    Woodrow Wilson! The first White House Press Conference was held at 12:45 on 15 March 1913. Wilson had been president for 11 days and set up the news conferences as a way to let the press know better the president's thoughts on issues of the day. The very first conference was a rather awkward affair with 100 reporters and a lot of silence. They got a little better as Wilson got used to the format and the reporters got used to their new roles. Today's press conferences can be a lively affair which are quite different than the first ones over 100 years ago. https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-21761429 (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 21 24 by psnz
trivia question answer Which first did the film "Lights of New York" accomplish?
    The first 100% all talkie feature film. [quote]"Lights of New York," directed by Bryan Foy is the first all talking feature film.[/quote]https://wiki2.org/en/List_of_cinematic_firsts The film was a crime drama released by Warner Bros. and used the Vitaphone sound-on-disc system to reproduce its audible elements. [quote]The enthusiasm with which audiences greeted the talkies was so great that by the end of 1929, Hollywood was producing sound films exclusively.[/quote]https://wiki2.org/en/Lights_of_New_York_(1928_film) (psnz)
1 answer
May 21 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer In 1994, which former NBA star lent his name to a chain of movie theaters that he helped establish?
    Magic Johnson! The one big focus of Magic Johnson's theaters was to establish them in urban areas. This could give kids a better way to spend their time than getting in trouble on the street. [quote] A 1998 merger between Sony-Loews and Cineplex Odeon Corporation caused them to become part of the new Loews Cineplex Entertainment Corp. Magic Johnson worked with Lawrence Ruisi, President and CEO of Loews Cineplex Entertainment, during the planning and development of these theaters. Currently the chain's former locations are owned by AMC Theatres, after Sony-Loews was acquired by that company in 2006. Although they are still branded Magic Johnson Theatres, they are solely controlled by AMC. [/quote] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_Johnson_Theatres (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 21 24 by psnz
trivia question answer How quickly can the bacterium Vibrio natriegens replicate?
    It can produce another generation (doubling time) in less than 10 minutes under ideal conditions. Presently, it is the fastest-growing bacterium known. This bacterium was discovered in salt marsh mud and is also found in estuarine mud. https://www.nature.com/articles/s42003-024-06234-1 https://wiki2.org/en/Vibrio_natriegens (psnz)
1 answer
May 21 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer Drake was the 1st Englishman to circumnavigate the globe. Who was the 2nd?
    Thomas Cavendish https://www.britannica.com/biography/Thomas-Cavendish (pehinhota)
2 answers
May 20 24 by chabenao1
trivia question answer What is the latest age at which a human has been recorded as growing taller?
    As no one has yet been able to offer an answer, I can say that Robert Pershing Wadlow, whilst possibly not the *oldest* man to be recorded as growing taller, was certainly still growing at his death, as at 18 days before he passed away at the very early age of 22 years and 4 months, he was measured at 8ft 11.1 inches (2.72m). The year before he was a 'mere' 8ft 8in (2.64m). His great height was from "hypertrophy of his pituitary gland, which results in an abnormally high level of human growth hormone (HGH)." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Wadlow (Quiz_Beagle)
1 answer
May 15 24 by gmackematix
trivia question answer Do the two islands, Guadeloupe and St-Kitts, have a capital city with the same name, Basse-Terre?
    True, Basse-Terre is the capital of Guadeloupe while Basseterre is the capital of St. Kitts. https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/what-is-the-capital-of-saint-kitts-and-nevis.html https://www.britannica.com/place/Basse-Terre-Guadeloupe (pennie1478)
1 answer
May 20 24 by chabenao1
trivia question answer What role does a canary play in software development?
    Canary testing is a form of beta testing an update for software. So canary testing allows the update to be released to a smaller audience and tests it to make sure the new code does not cause any problems. The term comes from when canaries were used in mining to let people know the air was unsafe. The canaries were very sensitive to toxic gases, so if they died, the miners would have enough time to escape the mine. https://www.optimizely.com/optimization-glossary/canary-testing/ (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 19 24 by psnz
trivia question answer What family relationship did Emperor Tiberius have with Augustus?
    Augustus was the stepfather of Tiberius. [quote]He succeeded his stepfather Augustus, the first Roman emperor. Tiberius was born in Rome in 42 BC to Roman politician Tiberius Claudius Nero and his wife, Livia Drusilla. In 38 BC, Tiberius' mother divorced his father and married Augustus. Following the untimely deaths of Augustus' two grandsons and adopted heirs, Gaius and Lucius Caesar, Tiberius was designated Augustus' successor.[/quote]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiberius (psnz)
1 answer
May 19 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer Why is the world just a cat playing with Australia?
    The map on the link I have provided offers a great visual to answer the question. In effect, an outline of the continents can be drawn to make it look like a cat with Australia as a ball the cat is playing with. https://www.creativebloq.com/news/world-is-a-cat (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 19 24 by unclerick
trivia question answer How does a player score a 12-ringer in American 9-pin bowling?
    Knocking down all the pins, other than the central one. [quote]In American nine-pin bowling, a ringer is an equivalent term for knocking down all pins on the first ball of the frame (known as a "full house").[/quote]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strike_(bowling) [quote]They use nine [pins] and set them up in a diamond. The one in the center is painted red. If you knock them all over, you score a 9. If you knock over the 8 surrounding the red pin and leave it standing, you score a 12 ringer.[/quote]https://texashuntingforum.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/ubb/grabnext/Board/23/mode/showflat/sticky/0/dir/old/posted/1676117707 (psnz)
1 answer
May 19 24 by BigTriviaDawg
trivia question answer What kind of animal is a tuco-tuco?
    Tuco-tuco are neotropical rodents! They get their name from the sound they make as they dig their burrows! They live throughout South America with 60 different species within the genus Ctenomys. [quote] Tuco-tucos live in excavated burrows and spend a majority (up to 90%) of their lives underground. It is estimated that they represent about 45% of all the underground rodents of the world. Their burrows maintain a fairly constant temperature and humidity level that is independent of the geographic region. In order to excavate the soil, they have many morphological adaptations, including their body shape, reduced eyes, and strong limbs. Their olfaction is increased and is used to help orient themselves during digging and establishing a territory. The two techniques they use for digging are scratch-digging and skull-tooth digging. A combination of the two methods are often used. Their claws and forelimbs are used primarily for scratch-digging, and their skull and incisor teeth are used secondarily for skull-tooth digging. [/quote] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuco-tuco (BigTriviaDawg)
1 answer
May 19 24 by psnz
trivia question answer What was old-time bodybuilder Lionel Strongfort's real name?
    Max Unger. [quote]Lionel Strongfort, born Max Unger (23 November 1878 - 27 November 1967) was a German bodybuilder, wrestler and author of the correspondence physical exercise course, known as the Strongfort System of Physical Culture, or Strongfortism.[/quote]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lionel_Strongfort (psnz)
1 answer
May 19 24 by serpa
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