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Quiz about Daffy Definitions
Quiz about Daffy Definitions

Daffy Definitions Trivia Quiz


The Dictionary Game in quiz form. You need to pick out the actual definition for obscure words or meanings, from among my plausible, but wrong, definitions. I used the Pocket OED (1975).

A multiple-choice quiz by Rimrunner. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
Rimrunner
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
330,849
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
504
Question 1 of 10
1. A bright idea may help you to say: which is the right definition for the word 'actinism'? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. You can't get into bed until you have the right answer: what is the definition for the word 'biffin'? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. What is the only correct definition, however bad it may be, for the word 'ceruse'? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. You may need to look under the heel of a shoe. What is the right definition for the word 'dottle'? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. If the barber had only known! What is the right definition for the word 'flavin'? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Neither the tinker, nor the soldier nor the sailor would know. Do you know the right definition for the word 'gimp'? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. What is the only correct definition, a priori, for the word 'glebe'? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Ask Karen von Blixen-Finecke for help here: which is the right definition for the word 'harmattan'? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. What is the only correct definition, from these choices, for the wonderful word 'keck'? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. What is the only correct definition, from these choices, for the word
'lyddite'?
Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. A bright idea may help you to say: which is the right definition for the word 'actinism'?

Answer: Property by which light produces chemical changes

Perhaps the adjective, actinic, would have sounded more familiar? The property of actinism is best illustrated in photographic film, in which chemical changes form an image in response to light. The clue 'bright idea' was intended to give you the comic book idea of a light bulb.
The 'artistic movement' and 'infective mechanism' are inventions; the 'combined power' is a loose description of synergy.
2. You can't get into bed until you have the right answer: what is the definition for the word 'biffin'?

Answer: Deep-red cooking apple

Ever heard of an 'apple-pied' bed? Who said this was supposed to be easy?
It is the apple, and the false options are all imaginary.
3. What is the only correct definition, however bad it may be, for the word 'ceruse'?

Answer: White lead especially used as a cosmetic

White lead in cosmetics? Sounds like a really bad idea, doesn't it? Well, yes, it was - but back in the days when they used ceruse, they didn't yet know about lead poisoning.
Cerise (not ceruse) is a clear, light or pale red colour (possibly even pink!); the mashed onion and the love poem are products of my fevered brain.
4. You may need to look under the heel of a shoe. What is the right definition for the word 'dottle'?

Answer: Remnant of tobacco in smoked pipe

Pipe smokers often use the heel of their shoe as an 'anvil' against which to knock the dottle out of their pipes. The wrong answers are all complete fictions.
5. If the barber had only known! What is the right definition for the word 'flavin'?

Answer: Surgical antiseptic and yellow dye, obtained from dyer's oak

Historically, barbers were the surgeons of their day; however, this was before the discoveries of antisepsis or anasthaesia...
Once again, the red herrings are plausible inventions. The word 'flavin' is derived from the Latin for yellow.
6. Neither the tinker, nor the soldier nor the sailor would know. Do you know the right definition for the word 'gimp'?

Answer: Twist of silk (or something similar) with cord or wire running through it

The nursery rhyme or counting game phrase is 'Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Sailor'
(also used in John Le Carré's novel title as 'Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.')
I figured that if you arrived at 'Tailor' you would be able to guess the right answer.
A 'brand or stamp' would be a hallmark, and a 'secret peephole' is a spyhole.
The 'momentary image' is a glimpse.
7. What is the only correct definition, a priori, for the word 'glebe'?

Answer: Piece of land attached to a church position; part of a 'living'

It's not a grebe (a diving water bird); not a glade (valley); not a glede (a hot coal); and the 'small coin' is entirely a figment of imagination.
A priori is meant to be a clue in pun: 'a priory'. Philosophically, the phrase refers to what is objectively known to be true, e.g. All parrots are birds.
Historically, clergy appointed to certain church positions acquired a 'living' which came with that position. This often included the income derived from a piece of land or property. While ownership remained with the church, the clergyman was entitled to keep the income, and was often responsible for managing the asset.
8. Ask Karen von Blixen-Finecke for help here: which is the right definition for the word 'harmattan'?

Answer: Parching African land-wind

Why Karen? Because she wrote the rather well-known book, 'Out of Africa', which should have directed you to the right answer, although the Harmattan is West African rather than East African. The wrong answers are all made up.
9. What is the only correct definition, from these choices, for the wonderful word 'keck'?

Answer: Make a sound as if about to vomit

I don't think many will get this one. The right definition is just too far-fetched to be a real word. (Which is what makes it perfect for this game!)
Of course, learning words like this is one good reason to do quizzes like this one!
Once again, I have invented the wrong alternatives.
10. What is the only correct definition, from these choices, for the word 'lyddite'?

Answer: Explosive used in artillery shells

One who opposes technology is a 'Luddite', after Ned Ludd, who opposed the job-destroying Industrial Revolution in England in the early 19th century.
The spike in a candle holder is known as the spike in a candle holder, and
so far as I know, the Lydians never existed (at least not as a Coptic group).
In military histories and war stories (especially those set in the Great War) one does read of 'lyddite fumes' in artillery bombardments. Lyddite is a generic English name for the explosive picric acid compounds used in munitions between, say, 1890 and 1930.
Source: Author Rimrunner

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor CellarDoor before going online.
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