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Thematic Places Quizzes, Trivia and Puzzles
Thematic Places Quizzes, Trivia

Thematic Places Trivia

Thematic Places Trivia Quizzes

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101 Thematic Places quizzes and 1,045 Thematic Places trivia questions.
1.
  Waving Goodbye to My Colonial Masters   best quiz  
Classification Quiz
 18 Qns
Former British Colonies Finding Their Own Identity
Canada, Australia and New Zealand were once far-flung outposts of the British Empire and adopted British customs initially. In time they developed their own unique cultural traditions. Here are just a few aspects unique to each of these countries.
Easier, 18 Qns, 1nn1, Jan 24 24
Easier
1nn1 gold member
Jan 24 24
301 plays
2.
  The Counties of Old England    
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
Over the years there have been changes to the names of English counties. In this quiz each answer contains the name of a county as it was known before local government reforms in 1965 and 1974.
Average, 10 Qns, Quizaddict1, Mar 25 24
Average
Quizaddict1 gold member
Mar 25 24
200 plays
3.
Where Am I Saying
  Where Am I Saying?   great trivia quiz  
Photo Match
 10 Qns
Place-Themed Terms
Take a trip with me around the world, sampling common terms as we go! Just match the place name with a word to form a common term, for example, match "Brazil" and a picture of a nut to form Brazil Nut! Have fun!
Very Easy, 10 Qns, lordprescott, May 14 23
Very Easy
lordprescott gold member
May 14 23
1110 plays
4.
  Trivia Towers   great trivia quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
A tower is a tall, narrow building often with some purpose. We have church, water, control, radio, and bell towers and then there's the ten types represented in this quiz.
Average, 10 Qns, Midget40, Sep 29 23
Average
Midget40 gold member
Sep 29 23
173 plays
5.
Cricket Tour Sightseeing
  Cricket Tour Sightseeing   best quiz  
Photo Quiz
 12 Qns
There are currently twelve nations designated by the International Cricket Commission as full members, who can compete in test matches. Let's do some sightseeing and see what question each country inspires.
Very Easy, 12 Qns, looney_tunes, Nov 14 23
Very Easy
looney_tunes editor
Nov 14 23
266 plays
6.
A Big House
  A Big House   great trivia quiz  
Photo Quiz
 10 Qns
A Mixture of Domiciles of Immense Size
If you're shopping around for a house, you might as well live large! In this quiz, there's not just one big house, but ten. Find yourself at home with some mixed trivia. Good luck!
Average, 10 Qns, kyleisalive, Aug 22 23
Average
kyleisalive editor
Aug 22 23
358 plays
7.
  Destinations   popular trivia quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
And away we go to ten places-- some real and some not-- that you can take a visit to. All you need to do is figure out where you're going. Good luck!
Average, 10 Qns, kyleisalive, Aug 06 22
Average
kyleisalive editor
Aug 06 22
613 plays
8.
Find Your Own Way  With A Little Help
  Find Your Own Way - With A Little Help   popular trivia quiz  
Photo Quiz
 10 Qns
Although many of us try to find our own way through life, it can be a lot easier if we follow some directions...
Easier, 10 Qns, darksplash, Jul 08 20
Easier
darksplash
Jul 08 20
672 plays
9.
Malibu Miscellany
  Malibu Miscellany   top quiz  
Photo Quiz
 10 Qns
'Malibu' conjures up many different images - here are some of them, from the Caribbean to Springfield, with a lot of California on the way.
Easier, 10 Qns, looney_tunes, Aug 26 17
Easier
looney_tunes editor
Aug 26 17
1533 plays
10.
  The World According to FunTrivia   best quiz  
Multiple Choice
 20 Qns
I signed up for Commission Number 62 and I received the title, "The World According to FunTrivia". What am I supposed to do with a title like that? [This 20 question narrative is best played in timed or untimed mode].
Average, 20 Qns, 1nn1, Apr 13 24
Average
1nn1 gold member
Apr 13 24
627 plays
trivia question Quick Question
If someone was taken seriously ill in Australia's outback, who would respond to an emergency call?

From Quiz "Armchair Traveller 5"




11.
  Country Connections #2   great trivia quiz  
Match Quiz
 10 Qns
Another round of pairing nationality terms with other words to form common phrases.
Very Easy, 10 Qns, zorba_scank, Jul 09 17
Very Easy
zorba_scank gold member
1487 plays
12.
Joy to the Mill
  Joy to the Mill   great trivia quiz  
Photo Quiz
 10 Qns
Many industrial buildings are now part of the English landscape and heritage, and sayings from old industrial processes are part of our language.
Average, 10 Qns, Christinap, Jul 10 17
Average
Christinap
973 plays
13.
  Street-Wise   top quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
How much do you know about famous streets?
Average, 10 Qns, MotherGoose, Aug 15 23
Average
MotherGoose editor
Aug 15 23
5128 plays
14.
  Well Worth the Climb   great trivia quiz  
Match Quiz
 10 Qns
Just match the real or fictional climbers on the left with the places they were climbing. Have fun!
Easier, 10 Qns, shvdotr, May 11 18
Easier
shvdotr gold member
May 11 18
549 plays
15.
  Country Connections    
Match Quiz
 10 Qns
Pair up these nationality words appropriately to form commonly used terms.
Easier, 10 Qns, zorba_scank, Jul 10 17
Easier
zorba_scank gold member
1607 plays
16.
  Sunshine State vs Sunshine State   top quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
The Phoenix Rising team has many players from the Sunshine State. Both from Queensland Australia and Florida USA. Friendly rivalry abounds so this became a Sprint Quiz opportunity. This quiz was written by a Banana Bender and a Floridian.
Average, 10 Qns, 1nn1, Nov 28 17
Average
1nn1 gold member
Nov 28 17
1427 plays
17.
  Improper Nouns    
Match Quiz
 10 Qns
Match the noun with the correct nationality.
Very Easy, 10 Qns, nyirene330, Jul 09 17
Very Easy
nyirene330
1330 plays
18.
  Armchair Traveller 4    
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
Explore the world right from your sofa with 'The Travel Show'. Here are some of the most intriguing things the show has taught me.
Easier, 10 Qns, AcrylicInk, Mar 20 18
Easier
AcrylicInk gold member
Mar 20 18
480 plays
19.
  Cafés that Never Really Were    
Multiple Choice
 15 Qns
These questions are about cafés in fiction: novels, poetry, movies, opera, television, comics, radio, cartoons, plays and other works of imagination. How much do you know about these cafés?
Average, 15 Qns, FatherSteve, Aug 28 19
Average
FatherSteve gold member
Aug 28 19
394 plays
20.
  Houses that Never Really Were, Door #1   great trivia quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
Do imaginary friends live only in imaginary houses? Do dream houses exist only in dreams? How many of these fictional, made-up, pretend houses can you sort?
Easier, 10 Qns, FatherSteve, Jul 27 17
Easier
FatherSteve gold member
613 plays
21.
  Postcards from Places that Don't Exist   great trivia quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
The magic of books, movies, television shows and even history, is that they can transport us to places that don't exist. Or do they? Here are ten examples of postcards from places that do not exist or, if they do, they are somewhere else.
Average, 10 Qns, 1nn1, Sep 21 19
Average
1nn1 gold member
Sep 21 19
502 plays
22.
  Hotels that Never Really Were, Suite A   top quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
A hotel is not only a substitute for home and an adventure in residency, but also an ideal setting for stories about the people brought together in such places. How many of these fictional hotels can you sort?
Average, 10 Qns, FatherSteve, Feb 13 19
Average
FatherSteve gold member
Feb 13 19
481 plays
23.
  Armchair Traveller 3   popular trivia quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
'The Travel Show' has opened my eyes to amazing things from around the world. Here are a few of them.
Easier, 10 Qns, AcrylicInk, Feb 17 18
Easier
AcrylicInk gold member
Feb 17 18
584 plays
24.
  Armchair Traveller   popular trivia quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
I love to watch the BBC's 'The Travel Show'. It's a chance to experience things that are happening all around the world, right from my living room. Here are some of my favourites.
Average, 10 Qns, AcrylicInk, Jul 14 17
Average
AcrylicInk gold member
791 plays
25.
  Understanding Traditional British Pubnames   popular trivia quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
There is more in some traditional pubnames than meets the eye. They may refer to a local incident, a lost tradition or may have a completely different meaning than a modern mind would think of. See for yourself how transparent the following names are.
Tough, 10 Qns, flem-ish, Dec 02 17
Tough
flem-ish
Dec 02 17
4900 plays
26.
  The World of Hotels   popular trivia quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
Hotels of the worlds of music, games, literature and reality
Tough, 10 Qns, Snowman, Jul 10 17
Tough
Snowman gold member
772 plays
27.
  Armchair Traveller 7   top quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
The BBC's 'The Travel Show' features some of the most amazing things to see and experience in the world. Here are a few of my favourites.
Average, 10 Qns, AcrylicInk, Jan 06 19
Average
AcrylicInk gold member
Jan 06 19
315 plays
28.
  Where Can I Find This?   popular trivia quiz  
Match Quiz
 10 Qns
Did you ever hear of item, place or animal and wonder where those things are located? Now is your chance to put your knowledge to the test and tell where I can find these ten things.
Average, 10 Qns, Joepetz, Apr 21 19
Average
Joepetz gold member
Apr 21 19
362 plays
29.
Magnifique Mozambique
  Magnifique Mozambique   great trivia quiz  
Multiple Choice
 10 Qns
Dancing cheek to cheek in Mozambique, requires technique that's so unique. This quiz takes a sticky-beak at items linked by name to the aforementioned country. Come on, take a peek and try your luck.
Average, 10 Qns, purelyqing, Sep 29 22
Average
purelyqing gold member
Sep 29 22
111 plays
30.
  Islands of the Mind   popular trivia quiz  
Match Quiz
 10 Qns
Imaginary islands, ancient to modern, from literature, film, television, music and video games for you to match with their source.
Very Easy, 10 Qns, Whitney37, Oct 21 17
Very Easy
Whitney37 gold member
Oct 21 17
570 plays
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Thematic Places Trivia Questions

1. Edward V of England and his younger brother Richard have become known throughout history as the 'Princes in the Tower'. To which dynasty, famous for its part in an ongoing civil war, did they belong?

From Quiz
Trivia Towers

Answer: York

These civil wars (1455 - 1487) would later become known as the The Wars of the Roses where the Houses of Lancaster and York battled for the English Crown. The Plantagenet were directly preceding them - Edward the III had three children whose ancestors would fight for the right to sit on the throne. His eldest son was Edward, the Black Prince, who predeceased him so his son became Richard the II - the last true Plantagenet King. Richard II died with no heirs. Edwards's second son was John of Gaunt whose descendants would become the House of Lancaster and his youngest son was Edmund of York. Their heirs would fight until Elizabeth of York (the young princes' elder sister) married the Lancaster's heir and the houses united with Henry VII becoming the first Tudor King. The Hanovers were centuries later beginning in 1714 with George I. The young princes were only 12 and 9 respectively when their father died and were supposedly taken to the Tower to keep them safe and prepare them for the coronation. They disappeared in 1483 - presumed murdered, probably by their uncle who became Richard III.

2. In 1498, which country colonised what is now Mozambique?

From Quiz Magnifique Mozambique

Answer: Portugal

The voyage of Vasco da Gama around the Cape of Good Hope in 1498 facilitated the Portuguese in establishing coastal settlements along the south-east coast of Africa, displacing small Arab trading centres. These new ports were stopping-off points for the new trade with India. Later, the Portuguese captured thousands of people from Mozambique and dispatched them to the New World as slaves. Gold and diamonds were also mined and sent back to Portugal. Portugal's dictator refused to give up his three mainland colonies of Guinea-Bissau, Angola and Mozambique and none of them achieved independence until after he died in 1975; most other African nations achieved independence in the 1960s. This question was written into the quiz by Phoenix Rising team member 1nn1 who remains a Lusophile despite the subject content of this question.

3. In his epic poem "The Song of Hiawatha" Longfellow refers to "the shores of "Gitche Gumee", "the shining Big-Sea-Water", but the place is known to us as what?

From Quiz Poetic Places

Answer: Lake Superior

Henry Longfellow took advice about the spelling of various people, places and things from the aptly named scholar Henry Schoolcraft who was an expert in the Ojibwe language. Modern writers in Ojibwe use various spellings such as gichi-gami, gitchi-gami or kitchi-gami, but all are names for Lake Superior in different dialects. The words really do imply big/huge/large, and sea/water. Longfellow could have used any version and it would still have fitted with his hypnotic poetic rhythm. [D]

4. In the decorative arts, what name is given to the technique of covering wood, leather or metal with a hard varnish, often black in colour, in imitation of Asian lacquer work?

From Quiz Country File

Answer: Japanning

This technique came became popular in Europe in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries because of growing interest in, and admiration for, the lacquer work brought back by travellers. In Japan and other far eastern countries this technique was also often used to decorate pottery.

5. Riverdale High School was first seen in the long-running comic book series and then in the much different television series about whom?

From Quiz Schools That Never Really Were, District 6

Answer: Archie, Jughead, Veronica

The innocent comic-book series "Archie" was created in 1941 around the adventures of a group of middle-class students at Riverdale High School. The editorial design was to make the characters relatable and normal. The characters and setting were broadly adapted in 2017 to a freaky supernatural television series. The chief writer, Robert Aguirre-Sacasa, described it as "'Riverdale' is Archie Meets Twin Peaks."

6. What does the term "Chinatown" refer to?

From Quiz It's Chinatown!

Answer: It is an ethnic enclave of Chinese people, located outside China, Hong Kong, Taiwan or Macau

As the name clearly suggests, the term "Chinatown" refers to an ethnic enclave of Chinese people, that is located outside China, Hong Kong, Taiwan or Macau. They exist throughout the world, in North America, South America, Europe, Africa, Australia and Asia. For example, there are several places that are called Chinatown in a number of cities in the United States of America such as San Francisco in California and Edison in New Jersey.

7. Who lived at 221B Baker Street, London?

From Quiz Famous Addresses

Answer: Sherlock Holmes

The fictional detective Sherlock Holmes created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle lived at 221 Baker Street, with his friend and helper Doctor Watson and his long suffering landlady Mrs. Hudson. Today it is a museum dedicated to Sherlock.

8. What is the name of the café owned by Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart) in the 1942 American motion picture "Casablanca"?

From Quiz Cafés that Never Really Were

Answer: Rick's Café Américain

The motion picture "Casablanca" was based on Murray Burnett and Joan Allison's play "Everybody Comes to Rick's." Producer Hal Wallis bought the rights for $20,000 which sounds small in today's dollar but was, at the time, the largest royalty ever paid to film an unproduced play. In addition to Bogart, the cast included Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, and Dooley Wilson.

9. Between 1985 and 2007, which country was bombed once and invaded twice by the Swiss army?

From Quiz A Trip Around Europe

Answer: Liechtenstein

In 1985, the Swiss miscalculated the trajectory of rockets during a training exercise, and caused a forest fire in Liechtenstein, for which they paid compensation. Then in 1992, members of the Swiss army on a training exercise set up a command post in Triesenberg. Unfortunately, Triesenberg is in Liechtenstein. They apologised for their mistake. Finally in 2007, 171 Swiss soldiers, training in bad weather, entered Liechtenstein, marched into the country for almost three kilometres, before they realised their mistake and turned around. A Liechtenstein spokesman later said "It's not like they invaded with attack helicopters. No problem, these things happen", which is quite probably the most laid back response ever to an invasion, even if it was accidental.

10. Dondurma is a type of ice cream made in Turkey using goats milk and orchid root. What is special about this kind of ice cream?

From Quiz Armchair Traveller 8

Answer: It's sticky and chewy.

Dondurma is common in Turkey, as well as in Greece. It is mixed in barrels and beaten with long metal rods. The orchid root is used to make salep, which (along with mastic resin) makes the ice cream chewy. Dondurma is often sold by street vendors, who trick their customers by twisting the ice cream and turning it upside down. The ice cream clings to the stick and stretches, rather than drips. Its consistency is similar to bread dough.

11. The first stop on our magic carpet ride was contained within a very real place, and may have been a lush wonder of beauty amidst the desert that entranced the ancient world. To what wonderful, but possibly mythical, place are we headed?

From Quiz Magic Carpet Ride

Answer: Hanging Gardens of Babylon

Of the "Seven Wonders of the World", the Hanging Gardens of Babylon is the only one whose existence is in doubt. The Gardens were supposedly ordered to be built up a terraced hillside by King Nebuchadrezzar in the 6th century BCE. According to legend, they were meant to remind his homesick Persian wife Amytis of the lush wooded mountainous area of her childhood. Even that is uncertain, because there are historians who claim that other kings who lived in later eras may have had them built. These gardens were built up a terraced hillside, with exotic trees and other plants spilling over the stone balustrades that were constructed to look like a mountain. With the plants spilling forward over the stonework, the illusion of a floating garden was created. Even into the 21st century, archaeologists and other investigators have found absolutely no evidence that the gardens even existed. One problem in finding the remains of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon is that no one knows exactly where they may have been. But it is a sweet magical love story of a king's desire to make his wife happy. The Lighthouse of Alexandria, in Egypt; the pink, red and white city of Petra, in Jordan; and the Incan citadel of Machu Picchu, high up in the Andes in Peru, all existed. While the last parts of the lighthouse were destroyed around 1460 AD, both Petra and Machu Picchu still exist today.

12. What is the name of a dried up seabed in Jordan that was part of the Ottoman Empire until the Great Arab Revolt in the early 20th century?

From Quiz Armchair Traveller 7

Answer: Wadi Rum

Wadi Rum in Jordan was a seabed hundred of thousands of years ago. It is now a desert landscape and has been used as a filming location in a number of movies, including those set on other planets. In "Red Planet", Wadi Rum was used as a Martian landscape, and in "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story" it was used for the fictional desert moon, Jedha. The desert was used by famous historical figures like Lawrence of Arabia during the Great Arab Revolt. At the start of the 21st century, a Jordanian tourist company began to perform reenactments of a train robbery for tourists to experience the Arab Revolt for themselves.

13. Which 2011 romantic comedy places Judi Dench, Bill Nighy and Maggie Smith (among others) in a British retirement hotel in India?

From Quiz Hotels that Never Really Were, Suite B

Answer: The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

A remarkable ensemble cast (Judi Dench, Celia Imrie, Bill Nighy, Ronald Pickup, Maggie Smith, Tom Wilkinson and Penelope Wilton) take lodging in a hotel somewhere in India and find love. The film was based on a 2004 novel, "These Foolish Things," by Deborah Moggach. There was a rather lovely sequel in 2014.

14. Which city is home to the oldest, continually open university in the world?

From Quiz Armchair Traveller 6

Answer: Fez, Morocco

The University of Al Quaraouiyine was founded in Fez by a woman named Fatima al-Fihri. It first opened in 859 and is, according to UNESCO and Guinness World Records, the oldest functioning university in the world. In its beginnings, it was a hub for spirituality and education. The university's religious focus remained into the 21st century, as it mainly offers courses on Islam and legal sciences, as well as classical Arabic.

15. Set over a period of ninety years, which 2014 Wes Anderson motion picture tells the comic-bitter story of a great hotel in the Republic of Zubrowka and the people in it?

From Quiz Hotels that Never Really Were, Suite A

Answer: The Grand Budapest Hotel

"The Grand Budapest Hotel" is set variously in the present, the late 1960s and in 1932. It is the story of a concierge who must disprove a false allegation that he murdered one of his guests. It is also the story of the life cycle of a hotel. The film collected a suite of BAFTA nominations (11), Golden Globe nominations (4) and Academy Award nominations (9), as well it might.

16. In which Disney-Pixar feature-length motion picture do Mike and Sully go to college?

From Quiz Schools That Never Really Were, District 5

Answer: Monsters University

The talents of Billy Crystal (Mike), John Goodman (Sully), Steve Buscemi, John Ratzenberger and Bonnie Hunt combine in voicing this 2013 film -- a sequel (prequel, actually) to "Monsters, Inc." (2001). Randy Newman composed the score. Michael "Mike" Wazowski matriculates at Monsters University in order to become a scarer. He meets first-year scare major James P. "Sulley" Sullivan and they become competitors and friends. Adventures ensue.

17. William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, married Lady Dorothy Cavendish on 8 November 1766 at Burlington House, Piccadilly. The Royal Society moved there in 1857. They moved out in 1968. Where did the Royal Society move to?

From Quiz Wedding Venues of British Prime Ministers

Answer: 6-9 Carlton House Terrace

The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, is the oldest national scientific institution in the world, having been founded in 1660. They started off meeting at Gresham College, then after the Great Fire of London (1666) moved to Arundel House, then returned back to Gresham in 1673. In 1710 they moved to Fleet Street and then in 1780 they moved to Somerset House. Three prime ministers have lived on Carlton House Terrace, Palmerston (No.5), Grey (No. 13) and Gladstone (No. 11). Numbers 6-9 were previously used by the German ambassador. The other three addresses were early meeting places for the Geological Society of London, the Royal Astronomical Society and the Society of Antiquaries, all of which moved into Burlington House in 1874, and are still there today. Both the Duke and Duchess were buried at St. Marylebone Parish Church, where another Prime Minister, Robert Peel, married Julia Floyd on 8th June 1820.

18. Purchased in 1983 by Nancy Stibbard, which suspension bridge, originally built in 1889, can be found in 27 acres of parkland along with a collection of totem poles dating back to the nineteenth century?

From Quiz Not Lloyd, Beau Or Jeff. That's Ludacris!

Answer: Capilano

All of the possible answers are in Canada, but Capilano in North Vancouver, British Columbia is the one we were looking to cross. The bridge sits (or sways) 70 metres above the Capilano River and spans 137 metres. Although the original was made from hemp ropes, these were replaced with steel cables in 1903. Ranney Gorge is in Ontario on the Trans Canada Trail, Lynn Canyon is in British Columbia and the surrounding parkland is home to several swimming holes while the bridge at Montmorency Falls takes you over the top of the falls which are taller than those at Niagara.

19. Dress up and go! If you wanted to see Tokyo in a unique way, you could have gone on a MariCAR tour. What was 'MariCAR' a reference to?

From Quiz Armchair Traveller 5

Answer: A video game

MariCAR tours around the sights of Tokyo took place in go karts. But the uniqueness didn't stop there: customers could chose a costume to dress up in for the ride. The choices originally included video game characters like Mario and Luigi, but expanded to superheroes, Disney characters, and minions after a potential legal dispute with Nintendo. MariCAR was strictly a tour: no racing; no throwing banana peel; no turtle shells.

20. The movie "National Lampoon's Animal House" (1977) was set at which fictional college or university?

From Quiz Schools That Never Really Were, District 4

Answer: Faber College

The "men" of Delta (Tau Chi) House were students at Faber College. The producers sought to film the motion picture at the University of Missouri but were turned down by administrators who thought the film might reflect badly on the institution. The University of Oregon was persuaded to permit the filming on their campus in Eugene. While the university at first sought to conceal its participation in "Animal House," it is now a source of pride. For example, the Otis Day and the Knights version of the rock song "Shout," which figures in the film, is now sung at U of O football games.

21. On the "Rocky and Bullwinkle Show" (NBC-TV 1959-1964), what was the name of the institution of higher learning attended by the moose on a football scholarship?

From Quiz Schools That Never Really Were, District 3

Answer: Wossamotta U

Football scouts spotted Bullwinkle throwing Rocky around (for fun) and recruited them both to play football at Wossamotta U. Bullwinkle revived a failing football programme and was a hero. The alma mater of the school includes the line "Our praise for you will never cease. / All hail magenta and cerise." The school name is a mondegreen of "what's the matter [with] you?" At Universal Studios in Orlando, there is a Wossamotta U Stadium which is a Rocky-and-Bullwinkle themed gift shop which is also an Internet hot-spot and cell-phone charging station.

22. "The Jungle Book" (as well as its sequel "The Second Jungle Book") was written by which author?

From Quiz All About the Jungle

Answer: Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling collected his stories about a feral human child (Mowgli) raised in the jungle by anthropomorphic animals in "The Jungle Book" (1894) and "The Second Jungle Book" (1895). Kipling proved himself an expert fabulist in writing stories where various animals represent archetypes of human behaviour. These stories may have been originally written for his daughter's entertainment but quickly become popular and successful. The stories have been through many adaptations including Percy Grainger's musical "Jungle Book Cycle" (1958) and Walt Disney's 1967 animated classic and its 2016 remake.

23. In the Arthurian cycle of legends, what is Avalon?

From Quiz All About Avalon

Answer: The magical island on which Excalibur was forged

From the 12th century, Avalon has been associated with King Arthur. Some legends hold that it was the place where his sword was forged. Others hold that it was where he was taken to be nursed after the Battle of Camlann. Still others hold that it was ruled by Morgan le Fay. One strain suggests it was an island of apple orchards and another that it was the home of the Holy Grail.

24. Starfleet Academy is the primary training facility for which science- fiction universe?

From Quiz Schools That Never Really Were, District 2

Answer: Star Trek

Starfleet Academy is a department within Starfleet for the training of officers. Its headquarters is located at the Presidio of San Francisco, its campus across the Golden Gate Bridge in Marin County. The basic programme was four years; a few courses lasted as long as eight. The motto of the academy is "Ex Astris, Scientia" which appears on its insignia.

25. Dog racing is very popular in Russia, but which breed is preferred for "Russian Around" the circuit?

From Quiz Russian Around

Answer: Borzoi

Borzoi means swift or fast and the breed is also known as the Russian Wolfhound and is mentioned in Leo Tolstoy's epic "War and Peace."

26. Over the course of several novels from JK Rowling, Harry Potter and his chums attend which educational institution created to teach witches and wizards?

From Quiz Schools That Never Really Were, District 1

Answer: Hogwarts

The full name of the school is Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. It is located in a large castle in Scotland 'tho its exact location is concealed from Muggles (non-magical mortals) by magic spells. A large coeducational student body of eleven- to eighteen-year-olds attends and lives in four "houses" in the castle. Founded in the 9th or 10th Century, the Latin motto of the school is "Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus" which means "Never Tickle a Sleeping Dragon."

27. Somewhere in the world there is a sacred site where the indigenous people believe that touching the red sandstone is a way of communicating with the gods. What is the name of it?

From Quiz Armchair Traveller 4

Answer: Uluru / Ayers Rock, Australia

The Anangu (the indigenous people of central Australia) owned Uluru after a 1985 handover agreement. Although they didn't want people to climb the sacred rock, the activity was so popular that it remained an option for tourists at the site. An agreement was made that in 2019 there would be a complete ban on climbing Uluru. There are, however, other activities to do at the site: there is a 10.6 kilometer walk around the base, helicopter and camel tours, and stargazing experiences. The red sandstone rock is the focus of Aboriginal creation stories.

28. In the Middle Earth of J.R.R. Tolkien, what city/castle was the capital of Gondor, the name of which means in Sindarin "the Tower of Guard"?

From Quiz Castles that Never Really Were, Second Parapet

Answer: Minas Tirith

Built partly as a city and partly as a castle, Minas Tirith sits atop seven stories, each a hundred meters high. To conquer the castle, an invader would have to defeat its defenses seven times. The film "The Return of the King" (2003) shows how ridiculously difficult this is. In the Sindarin language, minas means tower and tirith means watch or guard. The coronation of Aragorn II Elessar, the son of Arathorn II and Gilraen, occurred there.

29. In the Middle Earth created by J.R.R. Tolkien, which enormous castle is occupied by the Dark Lord Sauron?

From Quiz Castles that Never Really Were, First Parapet

Answer: Barad-dûr, the "Dark Tower"

Sauron's castle, Barad-dûr, as described in "The Lord of the Rings" and "The Silmarillion" as gigantic. It is built as a fortress to protect the Dark Lord it harbours. It is found near Mount Doom in Northwest Mordor.

30. In the Batman franchise, what is the name of the personal residence of Batman?

From Quiz Houses that Never Really Were, Door #4

Answer: Wayne Manor

Bruce Wayne lives in his family's mansion: Wayne Manor. It is usually depicted (in comic books and films) as a large late-Victorian house. In the 1960s television series, the announcer (who was William Dozier, the executive producer) refers invariantly to it as "stately Wayne Manor."

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