FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Lost in Norway
Quiz about Lost in Norway

Lost in Norway Trivia Quiz


My plan was to go somewhere sunny and Mediterranean, but it seems I had the map upside down and here I am in Norway. Do you feel like joining me on my journey of discovery?

A multiple-choice quiz by rossian. Estimated time: 3 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Geography Trivia
  6. »
  7. Europe
  8. »
  9. Norway

Author
rossian
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
338,863
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
2246
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: bernie73 (8/10), Guest 81 (10/10), Guest 47 (10/10).
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. Norway is one of the three Scandinavian countries to have a constitutional monarch in the early part of the 21st century. Which of these, almost sharing his name with two English monarchs, became king of Norway in 1991? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. The four cities listed are among the northernmost in the world. Which of them could I visit while in Norway? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Norway is well known for its explorers. Which of these men does *NOT* fit into that category? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Norway's flag has a field (background) in red with a Scandinavian cross of which two colours on it? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Norway is particularly known for its fish dishes, with gravlaks (Norwegian spelling) being one of the most popular. Which fish is used for this? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Oslo, Norway's capital, was known by which of these names between 1624 and 1924? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Which currency would be needed for a visit to Norway during 2011? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Vidkun Quisling became President of Norway during the Second World War. His name has been adopted into English with which meaning? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Norway became a fully independent country only in 1905 when the union with which neighbouring country was dissolved? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Which Norwegian composer wrote the incidental music to accompany Ibsen's play 'Peer Gynt'? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
Jun 17 2024 : bernie73: 8/10
May 29 2024 : Guest 81: 10/10
May 26 2024 : Guest 47: 10/10
May 16 2024 : Dagny1: 10/10
May 03 2024 : jonnowales: 9/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Norway is one of the three Scandinavian countries to have a constitutional monarch in the early part of the 21st century. Which of these, almost sharing his name with two English monarchs, became king of Norway in 1991?

Answer: Harald V

Harald V succeeded to the throne on the death of his father, Olav V, by being the oldest male child even though he had two older sisters. His son, Haakon, became next in line in the succession despite, again, not being the oldest child. The Norwegian constitution was altered in 1990 to the principle of 'absolute primogeniture' which means that the oldest child succeeds to the throne irrespective of gender. Following this change, which was not made retrospective, the third person in line to the throne in 2011 is Princess Ingrid and not her younger brother.

The English kings were Harolds I and II, the latter of whom was killed at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.
2. The four cities listed are among the northernmost in the world. Which of them could I visit while in Norway?

Answer: Trondheim

Trondheim is situated at 63°25' north and is the third largest city in Norway. It was founded in 997 and was the Viking capital. It lies at the coastal end of the Trondheimsfjord, the third longest in the country at 81 miles (130 km). Murmansk is 68°58' north and is in Russia, Oulo is 65°00' north in Finland and Reykjavik lies at 64°08' north in Iceland.
3. Norway is well known for its explorers. Which of these men does *NOT* fit into that category?

Answer: Morten Harket

Roald Amundsen was the leader of the first expedition to reach the South Pole in 1911, arriving there one month before the ill-fated attempt by Robert Falcon Scott's British team. Nansen was also a Polar explorer with his 'Fram' expedition laying down principles which helped later expeditions to the North Pole.

Heyerdahl was the leader of the 'Kon-Tiki' experiment in 1947 which proved that travel by a raft across the Pacific was achievable. Morten Harket was the lead singer of the group 'A-ha' who had hits with 'Take on Me' and 'The Sun Always Shines on TV' both in 1985.
4. Norway's flag has a field (background) in red with a Scandinavian cross of which two colours on it?

Answer: Blue and white

The Scandinavian, or Nordic, Cross has the vertical nearer to the hoist side rather than central. The design has been adopted for all the flags in the region, including those of Finland, Sweden and Iceland. The Norwegian flag has a blue cross outlined in white on its red field and the current design was officially adopted in 1821.
5. Norway is particularly known for its fish dishes, with gravlaks (Norwegian spelling) being one of the most popular. Which fish is used for this?

Answer: Salmon

The literal translation of the name is 'buried salmon' as it was originally made by burying the salted fish in the ground to ferment. The current production method used is to cure the fish in a mixture of salt, sugar and dill. A form of dried, salted cod is known as tørrfisk and sursild is pickled herring.
6. Oslo, Norway's capital, was known by which of these names between 1624 and 1924?

Answer: Christiania

The name was also spelled as Kristiania between 1877 and 1924, and was based on the name of King Christian IV of Denmark and Norway, who also founded Kristiansand. The name of Oslo is older and was in use in the Middle Ages, but when the original town was badly damaged by fire in 1624 it was rebuilt in a different location and renamed.

The other names also exist for other places in Norway.
7. Which currency would be needed for a visit to Norway during 2011?

Answer: Krone

Most of the Scandinavian currencies share a common history from their membership of the Scandinavian Monetary Union, which lasted from 1873 until 1914. Iceland and Sweden use the krona and Denmark the kroner. The name translates as 'crown', which was also used for the British coin worth five shillings prior to decimalisation in 1971.

The Norwegian kroner was introduced in 1875 to replace the speciedaler. Norway is not a member of the European Union since the population has twice voted against joining in referendums held in 1972 and 1994.
8. Vidkun Quisling became President of Norway during the Second World War. His name has been adopted into English with which meaning?

Answer: Traitor

Quisling used the war as an opportunity to seize power for himself and his right wing Nasjonal Samling party. He became Minister-President between 1942 and 1945 in collaboration with the occupying Nazi forces. The Times newspaper published an editorial in 1940 referring to 'Quislings everywhere' and the term quickly became adopted as a byword for a treacherous collaborator. Churchill used the expression when addressing the US Congress in December 1941. Quisling himself was convicted of embezzlement, murder and high treason in 1945 and was executed by firing squad on 24 October 1945.
9. Norway became a fully independent country only in 1905 when the union with which neighbouring country was dissolved?

Answer: Sweden

Until 1814 Norway had been in a union with the kingdom of Denmark, but the Danish king, Frederick VI, ceded Norway to Sweden. The deal was struck to avoid an invasion of Jutland and ratified under the Treaty of Kiel. The Norwegians resisted this imposition which led to a short war, lasting less than three weeks, between Norway and Sweden.

This led to the personal union between the two countries with each having their own parliament but with foreign affairs handled by Sweden. After some sabre rattling, and an overwhelming public vote in favour of dissolution, agreement was reached for Norway to become independent.
10. Which Norwegian composer wrote the incidental music to accompany Ibsen's play 'Peer Gynt'?

Answer: Edvard Grieg

The play was first published in 1867 and it was staged for the first time in 1876. Grieg composed his accompanying music in 1875 and it was performed for the first time with the play's premiere. The music includes the well known pieces of 'In the Hall of the Mountain King', 'Morning Mood' and 'Solveig's Song'. Greig also wrote the 'Piano Concerto in A Minor' which remains a popular and often performed work. Of the other options I gave you, Sibelius was Finnish and Schönberg was Austrian. Mahler was born in Bohemia which was in Austria/Hungary at the time and is now part of the Czech Republic.
Source: Author rossian

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor trident before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series Lost, but not in Space:

My geography quizzes about being lost in various countries are scattered around the site, so here they are, in one tidy list.

  1. Lost in Croatia Average
  2. Lost in the Faroe Islands Average
  3. Lost in France Average
  4. Lost in French Guiana Average
  5. Lost in Greece Easier
  6. Lost in Italy Easier
  7. Lost in Montenegro Average
  8. Lost in Nigeria Easier
  9. Lost in Norway Easier
  10. Lost in Rwanda Average
  11. Lost in San Marino Average
  12. Lost in Spain Average

6/24/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us