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Quiz about When London Burned
Quiz about When London Burned

When London Burned Trivia Quiz


In 1666 a fire broke out in the English capital and would go on to destroy the city. How much do you know about how it happened, when it happened and who was involved?

A multiple-choice quiz by Red_John. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
Red_John
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
389,464
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
452
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 31 (7/10), Guest 104 (8/10), Guest 176 (3/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. It's widely known that the fire began at a bakery, but do you know the name of the proprietor? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Who is regarded as the first victim of the Great Fire? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. The primary means of containing fire was to create firebreaks by demolishing buildings. However, permission was required from the building owner to do this, and many of the properties in the fire's immediate path were rented to tenants, with their owners unreachable. Who instead was permitted to order the demolition of buildings in the circumstances? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. The King, upon hearing news of the fire, sailed along the Thames to view the conflagration for himself. At which spot did he land? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Who did the King appoint to take charge of the firefighting effort? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. One of the most famous losses during the Great Fire was St Paul's Cathedral. At what point during the fire did the building succumb to the flames? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. During the fire, officials closed the city gates to stop people getting out.


Question 8 of 10
8. The strong easterly wind blew the fire west towards Westminster, the location of both Parliament and the King's London residence. What was expected to provide a barrier to the flames? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Gunpowder was used to blow up buildings to create major firebreaks as the fire approached the Tower of London.


Question 10 of 10
10. At the time, London Bridge was the only fixed crossing of the River Thames that the City had. Wooden houses were built along its length connecting the north and south banks. Why did the fire not spread to the south side of the river across the bridge? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Apr 09 2024 : Guest 31: 7/10
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Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. It's widely known that the fire began at a bakery, but do you know the name of the proprietor?

Answer: Thomas Farriner

Thomas Farriner was at the time Conduct of the King's Bakehouse, his primary role being to provide ship's biscuit to the Admiralty.
2. Who is regarded as the first victim of the Great Fire?

Answer: The Baker's maid

While the Farriner family escaped the bakery via an upper window, their maid did not make it out of the building. Why this might be is unknown, although it is suspected she was afraid of heights.
3. The primary means of containing fire was to create firebreaks by demolishing buildings. However, permission was required from the building owner to do this, and many of the properties in the fire's immediate path were rented to tenants, with their owners unreachable. Who instead was permitted to order the demolition of buildings in the circumstances?

Answer: The Lord Mayor of London

Summoned to the scene in the middle of the night, the Lord Mayor, Thomas Bludworth, failed to appreciate the seriousness of the situation, and did not give orders for houses to be demolished. He famously described the fire as being so small "a woman could p*ss it out", after which he returned to his bed.
4. The King, upon hearing news of the fire, sailed along the Thames to view the conflagration for himself. At which spot did he land?

Answer: Queenhithe

Samuel Pepys travelled to the Palace of Whitehall to inform King Charles II on the first morning of the fire. The King was said to be distressed by the news and the lack of action undertaken by the Lord Mayor of London. Particularly after viewing the extent of the raging fire, His Majesty elected to take an active role in directing the firefighting efforts.
5. Who did the King appoint to take charge of the firefighting effort?

Answer: James, Duke of York

The Duke of York, younger brother of the King, was an experienced military leader, having served as Lord High Admiral since the Restoration in 1660. He fought tirelessly night and day to battle both the fire and the emerging violence against Roman Catholics and foreigners who were suspected of causing the fire.
6. One of the most famous losses during the Great Fire was St Paul's Cathedral. At what point during the fire did the building succumb to the flames?

Answer: Tuesday 4 September 1666

In 1663 a commission had begun work on plans to restore St Paul's. This included the architect Christopher Wren, who favoured demolition of the entire building but was overruled. Eventually, in late August 1666 agreement was reached on a proposal to re-clad the cathedral and install a dome in place of the original tower. Six days after the commission came to agreement, the fire started.
7. During the fire, officials closed the city gates to stop people getting out.

Answer: True

The aim of locking people in was for them to stay and fight the fire. However, the claustrophobia it led to brought about further unrest and contempt for the authorities.
8. The strong easterly wind blew the fire west towards Westminster, the location of both Parliament and the King's London residence. What was expected to provide a barrier to the flames?

Answer: River Fleet

Due to the long-lasting drought that London had been suffering since 1665, the River Fleet was low and the flames easily jumped the banks, sending the Duke of York and his officers into panic as the fire proceeded unexpectedly towards Westminster, and courtiers started packing.
9. Gunpowder was used to blow up buildings to create major firebreaks as the fire approached the Tower of London.

Answer: True

The Tower of London was of particular concern due to the presence of a major army garrison, with stores of up to 600 tons of gunpowder located within the Tower's walls. It is therefore ironic that gunpowder was responsible for saving the Tower from the fire.
10. At the time, London Bridge was the only fixed crossing of the River Thames that the City had. Wooden houses were built along its length connecting the north and south banks. Why did the fire not spread to the south side of the river across the bridge?

Answer: A firebreak was present on the north side of the bridge

In 1633, a fire destroyed buildings on the north side of London Bridge. Some of these were not replaced, creating a chance firebreak that prevented the fire in 1666 from crossing the bridge to the south bank of the River Thames.
Source: Author Red_John

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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