Quiz about Battle of the Desserts
Quiz about Battle of the Desserts

Battle of the Desserts Trivia Quiz


The great dessert chefs of the world had gathered in competition, but fierce rivalry soon saw their creations decorating faces instead of plates. Can you identify their desserts from the ingredients that are plastered all over the combatants?

A multiple-choice quiz by Wizzid. Estimated time: 5 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Hobbies Trivia
  6. »
  7. Food & Drink
  8. »
  9. Desserts

Author
Wizzid
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
342,703
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
1871
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 104 (7/10), Guest 76 (8/10), Guest 173 (3/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. The German chef began the Battle of the Desserts when he threw his dish at the head of a rival after one too many jibes. The Danish chef then had to remove several layers of chocolate cake with masses of whipped cream and chocolate shavings from his face, along with numerous maraschino cherries, two of which were posing as eyeballs. What dessert had caused the mess? Hint

Cherries jubilee
Black Forest cake
Welf pudding
Cherry strudel

2. The Danish chef continued the Battle of the Desserts when he lobbed his dish at the German chef, but missed. Hence, an unintended target acquired a faceful of rice, whipped cream, vanilla and chopped almonds. What Danish Christmas favourite had become shaving cream for the Turkish chef's beard? Hint

Danish pastry
Risalamande
Koldskal
Pandekager

3. The Turkish chef retaliated during the Battle of the Desserts, but he violently threw his native speciality at the wrong person. Thus a large chunk of layered filo pastry filled with chopped nuts and sweet syrup wedged itself firmly in the previously open mouth of the Italian chef. What dessert was this? Hint

Balaclava
Baklava
Blacklava
Balalaika

4. The Italian chef was speechless after being hit during the Battle of the Desserts, and in rage he hurled his dish at no person in particular. That person was the English chef, who literally came face to face with a mixture of coffee-dipped ladyfingers, whipped mascarpone and egg yolks, flavoured with cocoa and liqueur. Can you name this Italian dessert? Hint

Panna cotta
Gelato
Tortoni
Tiramisu

5. The English chef was temporarily blinded during the Battle of the Desserts, so he couldn't aim his own native dish very well. Hence, a mass of suet pudding and custard slapped into the side of the French chef's head, and a number of currants found their way into his ear. What was the name of this dessert turned missile? Hint

Spotted dick
Banoffee pie
Yorkshire pudding
Bakewell pudding

6. The French chef was told who had thrown the food at him during the Battle of the Desserts, but he couldn't hear very well and launched his own dessert at the wrong person. The American chef was thus forced to wear a mask of extremely thin pancake doused in caramelised sauce, orange zest and Grand Marnier. Fortunately, the flames of this dish were extinguished in flight. What French dessert was this? Hint

Teurgoule
Creme brulee
Crepe Suzette
Flaugnarde

7. The American chef staggered and hurled his speciality at the French chef during the Battle of the Desserts, but the Frenchman ducked. Suddenly the Canadian chef found his face plastered with a mass of spiced apple and buttered bread crumbs, topped with a generous helping of whipped cream. What American dessert had made a big hit with him? Hint

Brown Betty
Whoopie pie
Angel food cake
Boston cream pie

8. The Canadian chef slipped as he fired his own shot in the Battle of the Desserts. This led to the German chef having his toupee replaced by pieces of wafer crumb base with gobs of custard buttercream and a top layer of chocolate. What Canadian dessert had become a makeshift hairpiece? Hint

Sucre a la Creme
Nanaimo Bar
Beaver tails
Brown sugar pie

9. The New Zealand chef had been arguing with the Australian chef throughout the Battle of the Desserts about which of their countries had invented a particular dessert. The Kiwi had the last laugh, however, when he launched it at the Aussie's face and forced him to wipe away a mass of crusty meringue, gooey meringue, whipped cream and sliced fruit. What was the contentious dessert? Hint

Tuatara teurgoule
All Black pie
Pavlova
Mango Fonteyn

10. The Australian chef gained sweet revenge during the Battle of the Desserts. With an underarm bowling action, he launched his own nation's dessert at the head of the New Zealand chef, who then had chocolate icing from a cube of sponge cake smeared across his face, along with some desiccated coconut which literally got right up his nose. What dessert had been thrown? Hint

Chocolate crackles
Chappell surprise
Neenish tart
Lamington


(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The German chef began the Battle of the Desserts when he threw his dish at the head of a rival after one too many jibes. The Danish chef then had to remove several layers of chocolate cake with masses of whipped cream and chocolate shavings from his face, along with numerous maraschino cherries, two of which were posing as eyeballs. What dessert had caused the mess?

Answer: Black Forest cake

Black Forest cake or Black Forest gateau is called "Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte" in Germany. Kirschwasser liquor (made from cherries) is traditionally added to the recipe, which calls for layers of chocolate cake separated by whipped cream and cherries, with additional cream, maraschino cherries and chocolate shavings decorating the top.

This dessert apparently first appeared in Germany in the early part of the 20th century, although its name only appeared in print for the first time in 1934. The Black Forest in southwest Germany is where the Kirschwasser liquor (rather than the cake itself) originated.
2. The Danish chef continued the Battle of the Desserts when he lobbed his dish at the German chef, but missed. Hence, an unintended target acquired a faceful of rice, whipped cream, vanilla and chopped almonds. What Danish Christmas favourite had become shaving cream for the Turkish chef's beard?

Answer: Risalamande

Often served with a cherry sauce and some cinnamon, risalamande is a treat which is traditionally served cold at Christmas in Denmark. Risalamande was created in the late 19th century, and was originally a rather exclusive dish, owing to the fact that rice and cinnamon were relatively expensive imports.

It gained popularity after World War II, however, and became a common favourite. Often one almond is left whole in the dessert, and the person who finds it in their serving wins a prize of some kind.
3. The Turkish chef retaliated during the Battle of the Desserts, but he violently threw his native speciality at the wrong person. Thus a large chunk of layered filo pastry filled with chopped nuts and sweet syrup wedged itself firmly in the previously open mouth of the Italian chef. What dessert was this?

Answer: Baklava

The origins of baklava are obscure, but its current form was created in the kitchens of the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul during the height of the Ottoman empire. Varieties of baklava can be found from Syria to Greece, and it is thought that, in its most basic form, this food has existed in Central Asia and the Middle East for many centuries.

The recipe of baklava requires chopped nuts (often walnuts or pistachios) sweetened with syrup or honey to be pressed between many layers of filo pastry. It is sometimes served with whipped cream.

In the Balkans, many Muslims eat baklava during Ramadan.
4. The Italian chef was speechless after being hit during the Battle of the Desserts, and in rage he hurled his dish at no person in particular. That person was the English chef, who literally came face to face with a mixture of coffee-dipped ladyfingers, whipped mascarpone and egg yolks, flavoured with cocoa and liqueur. Can you name this Italian dessert?

Answer: Tiramisu

Tiramisu is most likely a relatively recent creation from the Veneto region of Italy, since its name and recipe did not appear in print before the 1980s. However, it may have been inspired by a similar Italian dessert called Zuppa Inglese, which originated as far back as the 16th century.

The name of this dessert is derived from the Italian for "pick me up", possibly in reference to the effects of the coffee in the dish, although some sources claim that it was named in honour of an apprentice chef, whose maiden name was Tiramisu.

The recipe calls for layers of coffee-dipped savoiardi biscuits (ladyfingers) alternating with a mixture of mascarpone cheese and a zabaione of eggs, sugar and Marsala wine or a liqueur. Cocoa powder is sifted onto the top of the dish.
5. The English chef was temporarily blinded during the Battle of the Desserts, so he couldn't aim his own native dish very well. Hence, a mass of suet pudding and custard slapped into the side of the French chef's head, and a number of currants found their way into his ear. What was the name of this dessert turned missile?

Answer: Spotted dick

Suet puddings date back to the Middle Ages, but the first known printed reference to a dish called spotted dick appeared in 1850 in the cookbook "The Modern Housewife, or, Menagere" by the chef Alexis Soyer. Traditionally, this dessert is a steamed suet pudding (containing chopped suet, flour, sugar, cinnamon and milk) which has been made with numerous currants inside, then served in a bowl of custard.

The word "spotted" obviously refers to the currants, although the origin of the second word is open to debate.

Some say is a corruption of the word "dough", or perhaps even "dog", since the dish is sometimes called spotted dog, especially when made with plums instead of currants.
6. The French chef was told who had thrown the food at him during the Battle of the Desserts, but he couldn't hear very well and launched his own dessert at the wrong person. The American chef was thus forced to wear a mask of extremely thin pancake doused in caramelised sauce, orange zest and Grand Marnier. Fortunately, the flames of this dish were extinguished in flight. What French dessert was this?

Answer: Crepe Suzette

Like many desserts, the origin of Crepe Suzette and its name is a subject of debate. However, the dish was certainly created sometime prior to the 20th century, since it had become a specialty of the French restaurant "Marie's" by 1898. The basic recipe calls for freshly made crepes (essentially, thin pancakes) to be covered with a sauce of butter, sugar, orange juice and zest, then doused with Grand Marnier liqueur which is set alight on presentation (ie, flambe).

The flame helps to further caramelise the sauce and bring the flavours together. Crepe Suzette is sometimes served with whipped cream or ice cream, and has the reputation of being a dessert of the upper classes, although naturally it can be enjoyed by all (apart from those wearing it on their face, perhaps).
7. The American chef staggered and hurled his speciality at the French chef during the Battle of the Desserts, but the Frenchman ducked. Suddenly the Canadian chef found his face plastered with a mass of spiced apple and buttered bread crumbs, topped with a generous helping of whipped cream. What American dessert had made a big hit with him?

Answer: Brown Betty

The dessert called Brown Betty is a simple but tasty fare which dates back to Colonial times in America, and is even thought to have been prepared on the trail by pioneers. Whilst other fruits may be used in the recipe, apple is the most common, and Apple Brown Betty is said to have been the favourite dessert of former First Lady Nancy Reagan.

The traditional recipe requires breadcrumbs and butter to be placed in a greased baking dish, and laid in alternating layers with sliced apples coated in sugar and cinnamon, then topped with more breadcrumbs, butter, and a splash of water or lemon juice before baking.

It is often served with whipped cream, ice cream, or lemon sauce.
8. The Canadian chef slipped as he fired his own shot in the Battle of the Desserts. This led to the German chef having his toupee replaced by pieces of wafer crumb base with gobs of custard buttercream and a top layer of chocolate. What Canadian dessert had become a makeshift hairpiece?

Answer: Nanaimo Bar

This popular dessert is named after the city of Nanaimo in British Columbia, and was created in the early 1950s by a Cowichan Bay housewife who submitted the recipe to the editors of a local cookbook. The original recipe consists of a bottom layer made with a mixture which includes graham wafer crumbs, butter, sugar, egg, cocoa and coconut, then a second layer made from cream, butter, custard powder and icing sugar, and finally a third layer of semi-sweet chocolate mixed with butter.

This dessert is not baked but simply chilled before serving.

In Nanaimo, these treats were originally called "Mabel bars", after their creator, Mabel Jenkins.
9. The New Zealand chef had been arguing with the Australian chef throughout the Battle of the Desserts about which of their countries had invented a particular dessert. The Kiwi had the last laugh, however, when he launched it at the Aussie's face and forced him to wipe away a mass of crusty meringue, gooey meringue, whipped cream and sliced fruit. What was the contentious dessert?

Answer: Pavlova

One of the greatest culinary debates of the Antipodes centres on the origins of the pavlova. The dessert is popular in both Australia and New Zealand, although it does appear that New Zealand has the better claim to its creation, since the recipe was first recorded there in a rural magazine of 1929, and the earliest Australian claim dates to 1935. Either way, the dessert was named in honour of the Russian ballet dancer Anna Pavlova, who toured Australia and New Zealand in 1926.

The pavlova is made with a mixture of beaten egg whites and sugar which is slow-baked until the outside becomes a crisp meringue shell while the interior remains light and fluffy. On cooling, this base is then topped with whipped cream and sliced fruit (commonly strawberries, kiwifruit, banana or passionfruit).
10. The Australian chef gained sweet revenge during the Battle of the Desserts. With an underarm bowling action, he launched his own nation's dessert at the head of the New Zealand chef, who then had chocolate icing from a cube of sponge cake smeared across his face, along with some desiccated coconut which literally got right up his nose. What dessert had been thrown?

Answer: Lamington

The origins of the lamington are disputed, but most people agree that they were named after Lord Lamington, who was the Governor of Queensland between 1896 and 1901. They are typically made with small cubes of white sponge cake (often semi-stale for firmness), which are dipped into runny chocolate icing and then coated all around with shredded desiccated coconut. Sometimes whipped cream and strawberry jam is placed between two halves of the lamington.

Whilst lamingtons are loved by millions of Australians, and have even been named a state icon by the National Trust of Queensland, Lord Lamington himself is said to have despised them.
Source: Author Wizzid

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Most Recent Scores
Dec 01 2022 : Guest 104: 7/10
Nov 26 2022 : Guest 76: 8/10
Nov 25 2022 : Guest 173: 3/10
Nov 18 2022 : Guest 32: 8/10
Nov 01 2022 : Guest 34: 3/10
Oct 22 2022 : Guest 73: 9/10

Score Distribution

quiz
12/10/2022, Copyright 2022 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us