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Quiz about A Postmodern Quiz
Quiz about A Postmodern Quiz

A Postmodern Quiz


This quiz includes postmodern philosophy and other related literature.

A multiple-choice quiz by zarcon411. Estimated time: 7 mins.
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Author
zarcon411
Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
282,805
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
995
Last 3 plays: Guest 49 (4/10), Guest 5 (3/10), Guest 117 (1/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Which text first introduced its readers to the term 'simulacrum'? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Who first welcomed us to "the desert of the real"? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Who described their religious experience as "It, from inside me, looked out and saw the world did not compute, that I - and it - had been lied to. It denied the reality, and power, and authenticity of the world, saying, 'this cannot exist; it cannot exist.' ... I knew that the world around me was cardboard, a fake"? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Who wrote "Reality Isn't What It Used To Be", which said: "If there is anything we have plenty of, it is belief systems. But we also have something else: a growing suspicion that all belief systems - all ideas about human reality - are social constructions. This is a story about stories, a belief about beliefs"? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Who seeks an assumed binary opposition in an author's narrative, then rereads the text against the author's wishes from the perspective of the marginalized position, finally showing that the "correct" interpretation is undecidable? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Who argued that in the information age, knowledge has become a tool to perform work, truth is no longer seen as leading to consensus or freedom, and that every local conversation, like chat rooms, should develop their own tentative rules for their own language games? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Who wrote that panopticism is a one-way power/knowledge relationship between those under surveillance and the watchers who could not be watched? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Who wrote: "For if the illusions of religion were to be discredited, there is no telling with what madness men would be seized, with what unimaginable anguish. It would become the duty of the wise to publicly defend and support religion, even to call the police power to its aid, while reserving the truth for themselves and their chosen disciples"? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Who wrote: "To understand how the most abstract metaphysical assertions of a philosopher have been arrived at, it is always well (and wise) to first ask oneself: 'what morality do they (or does he) aim at?'"? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Who wrote: "The certain possibility of death, however, discloses Dasein as a possibility, Dasein makes this possibility possible for itself as its ownmost potentiality-for-Being"? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Feb 20 2024 : Guest 49: 4/10
Feb 04 2024 : Guest 5: 3/10
Feb 03 2024 : Guest 117: 1/10
Jan 30 2024 : Guest 80: 6/10
Jan 04 2024 : Guest 137: 6/10
Jan 04 2024 : Guest 49: 8/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Which text first introduced its readers to the term 'simulacrum'?

Answer: Jean Baudrillard - "Simulacra and Simulations" (1985)

All these texts deal with simulations in different ways, but the first two novels never used the term 'simulacrum.' Baudrillard argued that everything has now become copies of a copy with no original copy.
2. Who first welcomed us to "the desert of the real"?

Answer: Jean Baudrillard

Baudrillard's "Simulations and Simulacra" was used as one of the main themes in "The Matrix."
3. Who described their religious experience as "It, from inside me, looked out and saw the world did not compute, that I - and it - had been lied to. It denied the reality, and power, and authenticity of the world, saying, 'this cannot exist; it cannot exist.' ... I knew that the world around me was cardboard, a fake"?

Answer: Philip K. Dick

It is from the novel "VALIS" (1982). Philip K. Dick has been heralded as a John the Baptist of the postmodern age because his plot twists involve twists in reality.
4. Who wrote "Reality Isn't What It Used To Be", which said: "If there is anything we have plenty of, it is belief systems. But we also have something else: a growing suspicion that all belief systems - all ideas about human reality - are social constructions. This is a story about stories, a belief about beliefs"?

Answer: Walter Truett Anderson

Anderson argued that in the global village where we have instant access to innumerable beliefs from around the world, we have come to realize the relativity of what we think.
5. Who seeks an assumed binary opposition in an author's narrative, then rereads the text against the author's wishes from the perspective of the marginalized position, finally showing that the "correct" interpretation is undecidable?

Answer: Jacques Derrida

Derrida is father of deconstruction which has become popular in literary studies; multiculturalism tends to leave out Derrida's last step.
6. Who argued that in the information age, knowledge has become a tool to perform work, truth is no longer seen as leading to consensus or freedom, and that every local conversation, like chat rooms, should develop their own tentative rules for their own language games?

Answer: Jean-Francois Lyotard

Lyotard wrote "The Postmodern Age" (1979) in which he argued that what characterizes our age is the collapse of the old beliefs in metanarratives.
7. Who wrote that panopticism is a one-way power/knowledge relationship between those under surveillance and the watchers who could not be watched?

Answer: Michel Foucault

While Bentham came up with the idea and term 'panopticism,' Foucault used the idea as a schema for viewing the modern age in "Discipline and Punish" (1975).
8. Who wrote: "For if the illusions of religion were to be discredited, there is no telling with what madness men would be seized, with what unimaginable anguish. It would become the duty of the wise to publicly defend and support religion, even to call the police power to its aid, while reserving the truth for themselves and their chosen disciples"?

Answer: Irving Kristol

Against the self-image of its followers, Drury has shown that neo-conservatism is postmodern in that Strauss thought there was no final truth outside of Plato's cave. Kristol argued that religion was important for channeling the behaviour of the masses in predictable ways.

He argued that we could protect society from disintegration through a 'double standard of truth' between the wise who could live with the brutal truth and the foolish who needed to accept their beliefs in order to go on with their work without being interrupted by endless unanswerable questions that undermine their way of life. 'Reality enforcement' is the attempt to use all of the resources at society's disposal to direct consensus reality and eliminate deviance.
9. Who wrote: "To understand how the most abstract metaphysical assertions of a philosopher have been arrived at, it is always well (and wise) to first ask oneself: 'what morality do they (or does he) aim at?'"?

Answer: Frederich Nietzsche

Nietzsche went against the philosophical tradition in arguing that impersonal theory was the outcome of personal bias, or moral values.
10. Who wrote: "The certain possibility of death, however, discloses Dasein as a possibility, Dasein makes this possibility possible for itself as its ownmost potentiality-for-Being"?

Answer: Martin Heidegger

Dasein was a projection towards its potential future. Life is completed in death, but death, although inevitable, is usually something that happens in-the-world to someone else. We never see our own death because we don't live beyond it. However, we can still make it real for ourselves on a personal level rather than theoretically, to view our life as a narrative whole with death as our ultimate possibility and end; no one else can die for you and it is final.

Modal logic adds to classical logic the non-truth functional operators necessity and possibility, which Kripke defined in terms of possible worlds. This is compatible with intuitionistic logic that states in order to keep consistency we must accept that some statements may be neither true nor false until proven otherwise, until then they remain an open possibility. While Heidegger agreed that from necessity we could infer existence and from existence we could infer possibility, he denied the validity of a corresponding hierarchy of value to these categories and made possibility important to the existence of Being-in-the-world.
Source: Author zarcon411

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