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Quiz about Eat Your Words
Quiz about Eat Your Words

Eat Your Words Trivia Quiz


Idioms have been around for as long as there have been words, and a number of them feature food. I've managed to serve up ten of them for you here. Bon appetit!

A multiple-choice quiz by eburge. Estimated time: 2 mins.
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Author
eburge
Time
2 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
330,369
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Very Easy
Avg Score
10 / 10
Plays
6667
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 174 (10/10), kkt (10/10), Barbs1 (9/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. The proof of the _______ is in the eating.

This idiom means the quality of something is uncertain until it has been tested, but what food goes in the blank?
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. If someone is acting crazy, they might be going what? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. If I'm chewing the fat with someone, what might I be doing? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. I'm calm, not nervous and not anxious. You might say I'm as cool as a what? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. He exaggerates a lot. It might be wise for you to take what he says with a grain (or a pinch) of what? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. If something is selling like hotcakes, how is it selling? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Someone who is high up in an organisation, for example, may be described as a big what? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. If someone likes something or someone a lot more than others, then it's described as being the what of someone's eye? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. If I work to earn the family's living, then I'd be bringing home the what? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Think this quiz was easy? If you were to describe it, what would it be a piece of? Hint





Most Recent Scores
Jul 18 2024 : Guest 174: 10/10
Jul 17 2024 : kkt: 10/10
Jul 14 2024 : Barbs1: 9/10
Jul 14 2024 : Guest 120: 8/10
Jul 12 2024 : Guest 216: 10/10
Jul 12 2024 : blaster2014: 10/10
Jul 12 2024 : bgjd: 10/10
Jul 11 2024 : Guest 107: 10/10
Jul 10 2024 : Guest 70: 5/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The proof of the _______ is in the eating. This idiom means the quality of something is uncertain until it has been tested, but what food goes in the blank?

Answer: Pudding

This proverb is often misquoted as 'the proof is in the pudding', which doesn't make much sense at all, but is easier to remember than the full phrase itself. 'The proof of the pudding is in the eating' means that to fully test something you need to experience it yourself.

Although some sources date this proverb back to the 14th century, the earliest example in print comes from William Camden's 1605 book, "Remaines of a Greater Worke Concerning Britaine".
2. If someone is acting crazy, they might be going what?

Answer: Bananas

The phrase 'go bananas' is more of a slang expression than an idiom, and hence is used mostly in informal contexts. Basically, to go bananas means to be overwhelmed by nervousness or wild excitement.
3. If I'm chewing the fat with someone, what might I be doing?

Answer: Having a chat

'Chew the fat' is predominantly a British phrase, while 'chew the rag' is more commonly used in America. There is some debate of the definitive origin of this phrase. Some sources claim that it comes from a time when sailors would chew on fat while working or resting.

Others hold that it originates from centuries ago, when pork was considered a luxury. When guests were over, the host would bring out bacon (a sign of wealth), and cut off pieces to share, so they could all 'chew the fat'. Either way, it means to engage in small talk with someone.
4. I'm calm, not nervous and not anxious. You might say I'm as cool as a what?

Answer: Cucumber

In this idiom, 'cool' doesn't mean a low temperature. Instead, it means unperturbed, calm and relaxed, as in 'keeping your cool'. The first definitive use of the phrase 'cool as a cucumber' appears in John Gay's 1732 work, "A New Song of New Similes", where he writes "I...cool as a cucumber could see the rest of womankind."
5. He exaggerates a lot. It might be wise for you to take what he says with a grain (or a pinch) of what?

Answer: Salt

If someone says something that think might not be true or a bit exaggerated, you may accept what they say but have some reservations about its validity. You would be taking what they say with a grain (or a pinch) of salt. The Ancient Roman observer Pliny the Elder came up with an antidote for a poison, which was to be taken along with a grain of salt.

Therefore, anything related to the poison was to be taken with a grain of salt, and as a result, was not trusted on its own.
6. If something is selling like hotcakes, how is it selling?

Answer: Really fast

According to Robert Hendrickson's "Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins", this particular phrase comes from the time when pancakes were first made and served hot at gatherings or fairs. They became so popular that the phrase 'selling like hotcakes' was used to refer to anything selling quickly and in large quantities.
7. Someone who is high up in an organisation, for example, may be described as a big what?

Answer: Cheese

When this phrase originated, sometime in the 19th century, cheese was used as a synonym for quality. John Camden Hotten noted that cheese was a word used to describe something "good, first-rate in quality, genuine, pleasant or advantageous." It wasn't until the 20th century that the phrase reached America and 'big cheese' was used to describe an important person.
8. If someone likes something or someone a lot more than others, then it's described as being the what of someone's eye?

Answer: Apple

William Shakespeare used this phrase in his play "A Midsummer Night's Dream" in 1600, and it has appeared in several other texts since then, but the source that made the phrase more widely used among the general population was in Sir Walter Scott's 1816 novel "Old Morality", in the line: "Poor Richard was to me as an eldest son, the apple of my eye." So if you cherish someone, then you would describe them as being the apple of your eye.
9. If I work to earn the family's living, then I'd be bringing home the what?

Answer: Bacon

This phrase is similar to the 'chew the fat' one featured earlier. In the time when pork and bacon was considered a luxury, bringing home bacon was a sign of wealth. At a gathering, the host would bring out the bacon and show it around, letting others know of his wealth. He worked hard for his family's living, and the fruit of his labour was this bacon.
10. Think this quiz was easy? If you were to describe it, what would it be a piece of?

Answer: Cake

It's as simple as that. Quite literally. If something is described as being a piece of cake, then it was an easy task that could be accomplished without hassle. American poet Ogden Nash used the phrase in "Primrose Path" to describe someone's life. Other similar phrases which regard a task as straightforward and simple include 'as easy as pie' and 'a cake-walk'.
Source: Author eburge

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor CellarDoor before going online.
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