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Quiz about Judith poem translated by Mary Savelli
Quiz about Judith poem translated by Mary Savelli

Judith (poem translated by Mary Savelli) Quiz


The Anglo-Saxon poem "Judith" is based on the Apocryphal book of the Bible. Quotations are from the translation by Mary Savelli. You can play even if you've never read the poem and are at least vaguely familiar with the story.

A multiple-choice quiz by skylarb. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
skylarb
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
147,653
Updated
May 29 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
400
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. The poem appears to be based on the version of "Judith" found in what translation of the Bible? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Do we know who is the author of "Judith"?


Question 3 of 10
3. Judith is called "strong servant of the Savior." What is this an example of? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Who does Judith decapitate in the poem? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Why does the Assyrian captain send for Judith to come to his chamber? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. What does Judith's name mean? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. How is Judith able to decapitate the Assyrian commander? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. How many blows does it take Judith to decapitate the Assyrian commander? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. From what city is Judith? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. "Judith" is unique in that it is the only Anglo-Saxon poem we have that exists as a complete manuscript rather than a fragment.



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The poem appears to be based on the version of "Judith" found in what translation of the Bible?

Answer: The Latin Vulgate

The King James and Geneva translations were not yet in existence when "Judith" was composed. "The Septuagint" was, but the poem appears to have been based on "Judith" as it appears in St. Jerome's Latin Vulgate. Jerome used an Aramaic text and another Latin translation to compile his version. "Judith" is included in Catholic and Orthodox Bibles but not in Protestant and Jewish Bibles.
2. Do we know who is the author of "Judith"?

Answer: no

"Judith" survives in a manuscript alongside "Beowulf," but both the author and date of composition are unknown.
3. Judith is called "strong servant of the Savior." What is this an example of?

Answer: A Christianization of the text

"The Savior" alludes to Jesus Christ, but the events in Judith take place prior to the birth of Christ. Judith also prays to God as the "Holy Son of Heaven." The author of the poem Christianized the Jewish tale, much as the author of "Beowulf" Christianized that pagan story.
4. Who does Judith decapitate in the poem?

Answer: Holofernes

Holofernes is the enemy of the Jewish people and the commander-in-chief of the Assyrian forces. In the Old Testament, a woman named Jael drove a tent peg through the commander Sisera, killing him.
5. Why does the Assyrian captain send for Judith to come to his chamber?

Answer: To seduce her

Holofernes is captivated by the beauty of Judith, and intends to take advantage of her. She, however, kills him and cuts off his head.
6. What does Judith's name mean?

Answer: Jewess

Judith means "Jewess," though the name was taken by many non-Jewish peoples. King ęthelwulf, for instance, had a Queen named Judith, who was the daughter of Charles the Bald, a West Frankish King.
7. How is Judith able to decapitate the Assyrian commander?

Answer: He is passed out drunk

Holofernes holds a huge drinking party, to which he beckons Judith. Later, he has his men bring her to his tent, but before she arrives, he has passed out from drunkenness.
8. How many blows does it take Judith to decapitate the Assyrian commander?

Answer: Two

"Then, she struck her enemy with shining sword, / swung that sharp blade straight down upon his stiff neck . . . / Then courageous lady / earnestly struck that heathen hound one more time / so that his head rolled forth to the floor below."
9. From what city is Judith?

Answer: Bethulia

Judith returns to Bethulia with the head of Holofernes, urging her people, "Then, bear your shields bravely forward, / bucklers to your breasts and your burnished helmets, / as you enter the antagonistsę campground."
10. "Judith" is unique in that it is the only Anglo-Saxon poem we have that exists as a complete manuscript rather than a fragment.

Answer: False

"Judith" survives only as a fragment. The first part of the story, in which the Assyrian army surrounds the city of Bethulia and cuts off its water supply, is missing from the most intact manuscripts. It begins, instead, after Judith has already rebuked the elders and left the city to infiltrate the camp of Holofernes: ". . . None doubted the gifts of the Grand Creator / to this great earth, where she had found help from God. /When she had the most need of the Mighty Prince, /then God protected her from greatest danger."
Source: Author skylarb

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Bruyere before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
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