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Quiz about Poes The Bells
Quiz about Poes The Bells

Poe's "The Bells" Trivia Quiz


Dig into this melodious poem by Edgar Allan Poe.

A multiple-choice quiz by skylarb. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
skylarb
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
406,009
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
258
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: HumblePie7 (4/10), wellenbrecher (10/10), calmdecember (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Which of these words is NOT used to describe any of the bells in "The Bells"? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. "How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle, / In the icy air of night! / While the stars that oversprinkle / All the heavens, seem to twinkle / With a _____ delight." What kind of delight? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. "Keeping time, time, time / In a sort of ____ rhyme." What kind of rhyme? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. "The Bells" is primarily written in anapestic meter and has a regular, predictable rhyme scheme.


Question 5 of 10
5. "From the bells, bells, bells, bells, / Bells, bells, bells." What rhetorical device is used in these lines? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. How does Poe describe the night air through which the "mellow wedding bells" ring out? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. "From the molten-golden notes, / And all in tune, / What a liquid ditty floats / To _____ that listens, while she gloats / On the moon!" Who is listening? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. "What tale of terror, now, their turbulency tells!" What poetic device does Poe employ in this line? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. "By the twanging, / And the clanging, / How the danger ebbs and flows; / Yet the ear distinctly tells, / In the jangling, / And the wrangling." What is the primary poetic device does Poe use in these lines? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Poe also uses personification in "The Bells". Which of these human-like actions does Poe NOT ascribe to the bells? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Apr 09 2024 : HumblePie7: 4/10
Mar 12 2024 : wellenbrecher: 10/10
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Feb 24 2024 : PurpleComet: 7/10

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Which of these words is NOT used to describe any of the bells in "The Bells"?

Answer: blackened

The sledge bells are silver:
"Hear the sledges with the bells-
Silver bells!"

The wedding bells are golden:
"Hear the mellow wedding bells,
Golden bells!"

The alarm bells are brass-colored:
"Hear the loud alarum bells-
Brazen bells!"

And there are also iron bells in the poem:
"Hear the tolling of the bells-
Iron bells!"

However, there are no blackened bells.
2. "How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle, / In the icy air of night! / While the stars that oversprinkle / All the heavens, seem to twinkle / With a _____ delight." What kind of delight?

Answer: crystalline

Crystalline is an adjective meaning clear or bright. It could also be meant to recall the sound of a crystal bell, though these bells are previously described as silver.

The British rock band Pink Floyd alludes to "The Bells" in their song "Time" on the 1973 album "The Dark Side of the Moon":

"Far away across the field
The tolling of the iron bell
Calls the faithful to their knees
To hear the softly spoken magic spells."
3. "Keeping time, time, time / In a sort of ____ rhyme." What kind of rhyme?

Answer: Runic

"Keeping time, time, time,
In a sort of Runic rhyme,
To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells
From the bells, bells, bells, bells,
Bells, bells, bells-
From the jingling and the tinkling of the bells."

The use of the term runic here implies having some mysterious or secret meaning. The term comes from the letters used to write various ancient Germanic languages.
4. "The Bells" is primarily written in anapestic meter and has a regular, predictable rhyme scheme.

Answer: false

The poem is not written in anapestic meter (which is two unstressed syllables followed by a stressed). Rather, the poem primarily uses a hurried trochaic meter, which involves a stressed syllable followed by an unstressed one (think of a sound like "DA-dum"). In the lines that repeat "bells," it switches to iambic meter (one unstressed followed by one stressed syllable).

The poem does not have a clear repeating pattern of rhyme. However, the rhyme is planned in such a way that it takes the reader along with the sound of the bells. The poem also uses frequent repetition to help set the rhythm. The rhyme scheme for the first several lines is AAABCBBCDDAAAA...
5. "From the bells, bells, bells, bells, / Bells, bells, bells." What rhetorical device is used in these lines?

Answer: epizeuxis

The poem uses a rhetorical device called "epizeuxis," which is the repetition of a word or phrase with no intervening words, in this case "bells, bells, bells." It also uses diacope, which is the repetition of a word or phrase with one or more intervening words, as below:

"Hear the mellow wedding bells,
Golden bells!"
6. How does Poe describe the night air through which the "mellow wedding bells" ring out?

Answer: balmy

"Hear the mellow wedding bells,
Golden bells!
What a world of happiness their harmony foretells!
Through the balmy air of night
How they ring out their delight!"

According to Dawn Sova in "Edgar Allan Poe", Poe likely wrote "The Bells" in May of 1848 and then submitted it repeatedly - three times - to Union Magazine, which was co-owned by his friend John Sartain, before it was finally accepted for publication. "The Bells," however, was not published until after Poe's death. It appeared in the November 1849 issue.
7. "From the molten-golden notes, / And all in tune, / What a liquid ditty floats / To _____ that listens, while she gloats / On the moon!" Who is listening?

Answer: the turtle-dove

In addition to being published in Union Magazine, "The Bells" appeared after Poe's death in the New York Daily Tribune newspaper. The work was published on the front page of the October 17, 1849 issue, where it was billed as "Poe's Last Poem." "Annabel Lee" is actually the last complete poem composed by Edgar Allan Poe, however.
8. "What tale of terror, now, their turbulency tells!" What poetic device does Poe employ in this line?

Answer: alliteration

Alliteration is the repetition of beginning consonant sounds. Poe uses this device frequently throughout the poem. Here, he uses it by repeating the "t" sound with "tale", "terror", "turbulency" and "tells."

Eric Woolfson put this poem to music on his 2003 album "Poe: More Tales of Mystery and Imagination."
9. "By the twanging, / And the clanging, / How the danger ebbs and flows; / Yet the ear distinctly tells, / In the jangling, / And the wrangling." What is the primary poetic device does Poe use in these lines?

Answer: onomatopoeia

Onomatopoeia is a term for the use of words that phonetically resemble the sounds they describe. Here "twangling", "clanging", and "jangling" are onomatopoeic words describing the sounds that the bell makes. Elsewhere, Poe uses "tinkling" and "jingling" to describe the sound of the bells.

In 1993, the Danish composer Poul Ruders used Poe's text in Dutch to write a piece for the high soprano, which was recorded by MC Lars on his 2012 EP "The Bells."
10. Poe also uses personification in "The Bells". Which of these human-like actions does Poe NOT ascribe to the bells?

Answer: laughing

Personification is giving human characteristics to inanimate objects. Poe does not describe the bells as laughing, but he does describe them as sobbing, groaning, and moaning:

"To the sobbing of the bell
Keeping time, time, time,
As he knells, knells, knells,
In a happy Runic rhyme,
To the rolling of the bells-
Of the bells, bells, bells-
To the tolling of the bells,
Of the bells, bells, bells, bells-
Bells, bells, bells-
To the moaning and the groaning of the bells."

He also writes:

"For every sound that floats
From the rust within their throats
Is a groan."

Sergei Rachmaninoff composed a choral symphony based on a Russian adaptation of "The Bells" by Konstantin Balmont.
Source: Author skylarb

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor looney_tunes before going online.
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Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series My Favorite Poems:

This list contains quizzes on my favorite poems. Most of these quizzes were written by me, but some of my favorite poems were already covered by other authors and have been added to this quiz list as well.

  1. Lord Byron's "The Destruction of Sennacherib" Average
  2. "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" Average
  3. "The Highwayman" by Alfred Noyes Average
  4. Rudyard Kipling's "If" Average
  5. The Gods of the Copybook Headings Average
  6. Journey Through a Midnight Dreary Average
  7. 'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner' Average
  8. The Flea Average
  9. Poe's "The Bells" Average
  10. Shelley's "Ozymandias" Average
  11. Whitman's "O Captain! My Captain!" Easier
  12. Let Me Not to the Marriage of True Minds Average

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