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Quiz about If They MoveKill Em The Wild Bunch Part 1
Quiz about If They MoveKill Em The Wild Bunch Part 1

"If They Move...Kill 'Em!" "The Wild Bunch" Part 1 Quiz


For your playing pleasure, I offer a multiple choice quiz in tribute to Sam Peckinpah's violent, controversial, yet brilliant masterpiece. Stay tuned for Part 2! Thanks for playing, and please rate if you have the time.

A multiple-choice quiz by doorsfan58. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
doorsfan58
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
282,056
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
379
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 181 (6/10), Guest 107 (2/10), Guest 136 (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. The now-famous line that I used for the title of this quiz ("If they move..kill 'em!") was delivered by William Holden's character, Pike Bishop, the leader of the Bunch. What major scene or event soon followed? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. After escaping from the bank robbery ambush, the surviving members of the "Bunch" rode to a small Mexican village to meet up with Freddie and split up the loot. After a spirited argument over the division of their shares, they opened the moneybags, only to discover they stole a large quantity of what worthless items? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. By way of flashbacks, it was obvious that Pike Bishop and Deke Thornton were partners, and even friends, at one point in time. Why was Thornton so motivated to track down Bishop and the rest of the "Bunch"? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Being a member of the "Bunch" was quite a family affair, as Tector (Ben Johnson) and Lyle (Warren Oates) Gorch were brothers. Which other two characters in the film were also related? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. As guests of General Mapache, during which time they were making plans to steal the arms shipment, Bishop, Dutch, Angel and Freddie were seen drinking and relaxing in a steam-room. Lyle and Tector had other plans, however and, accompanied by three young senoritas, went off to search for another means to wash off the trail dust. Where did the five of them end up bathing? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Even the darkest, most violent films find it necessary at times to have a moment or two of comedic levity, and "The Wild Bunch" was no exception. After the train robbery, the boys stopped for a well-deserved break and a quick taste of their favorite libation. The bottle was tossed about from man to man, each taking a generous swig. One poor member was deliberately ignored until the bottle was drained. Who never got to wet his whistle? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. After the rifles were stolen from the train, the "Bunch" crossed a bridge that was rigged with dynamite, with Thornton and the posse in hot pursuit. Just before the bridge exploded (with the posse on it), Bishop and Thornton made eye contact, and Bishop offered Thornton a simple gesture. What was the gesture Bishop made? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. After a heated and passionate discussion regarding his hatred for Mapache and the struggles his (Angel's) villagers were experiencing, Angel agreed to forfeit his share of the gold for the stolen rifles in exchange for another form of payment. What did Bishop and Dutch decide to give him? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. After the famous "Long Walk" scene, Bishop, Dutch, Lyle, and Tector confronted Mapache with the intent to rescue Angel. What did Mapache do next, to cause Bishop to shoot and kill him, prompting the "Battle of Bloody Porch" shoot-out? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. The film ended with an exchange between Thornton and Freddie, outside of Mapache's stronghold, following the "Battle of Bloody Porch", and the off-screen ambush of the bounty hunters. What was the final line that Freddie said to Thornton? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Feb 21 2024 : Guest 181: 6/10
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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The now-famous line that I used for the title of this quiz ("If they move..kill 'em!") was delivered by William Holden's character, Pike Bishop, the leader of the Bunch. What major scene or event soon followed?

Answer: The bank robbery/massacre

Holden's line was the first used by a major character in the film, and was spoken at the beginning of the bank hold-up. The shoot-out/massacre sequence following the bank robbery (or railroad office robbery, depending on the reference) gave the audience its first taste of what would become Peckinpah's trademark; multiple camera angles, regular and slow motion shots intertwined, and precise, complex editing. Peckinpah started developing this technique while filming "Major Dundee", but it was not fully realised and perfected until "The Wild Bunch", and would serve as an inspiration for scores of future action-film directors.

It took Peckinpah quite a few edits to trim the scene down to five minutes, but the results would set the standard for the remainder of the film.

A quick side note: "If they move...kill 'em!" was the first line spoken by a major character in the film, and was voted Number 72 of "The 100 Greatest Movie Lines" (Premiere, 2007). The "Battle of Bloody Porch" was the nickname given by the crew to the final, climatic shoot-out.
2. After escaping from the bank robbery ambush, the surviving members of the "Bunch" rode to a small Mexican village to meet up with Freddie and split up the loot. After a spirited argument over the division of their shares, they opened the moneybags, only to discover they stole a large quantity of what worthless items?

Answer: Steel washers

It was during this sequence that the "Bunch" realized that they were set up to be ambushed during the robbery. It included Freddie's memorable dialogue ("They? Why, they is the plain and fancy they, that's who they is. Caught you, didn't they? Tied a tin can to your tail...Oh my, what a bunch...

They? Who the hell is they?"). Bishop also revealed that Deke Thornton was a part of the posse who ambushed them. According to "The Wild Bunch: An Album in Montage", the special DVD which is included in the "Directors Cut" version of the film, it was during this scene that several of the principal actors came to work unrehearsed and unprepared. Peckinpah, in typical quiet fury, gave the entire group 20 minutes to basically get their act together, or "you will be replaced." All concerned found secluded spots to go over their lines, and the scene was filmed without further delay.
3. By way of flashbacks, it was obvious that Pike Bishop and Deke Thornton were partners, and even friends, at one point in time. Why was Thornton so motivated to track down Bishop and the rest of the "Bunch"?

Answer: He was being threatened by the railroad company with prison.

It was made clear, during the exchange between Thornton and Harrigan (after the bank robbery massacre), that Thornton was being forced to lead the posse to go after the "Bunch". Later flashbacks also revealed how Thornton was captured, (and later tortured in prison), as well as Bishop's escape.

It was also very obvious that Thornton despised not only Harrigan, but his "posse" as well, and would much rather have been riding with Pike and the boys. The flashback scenes were not in the original American release, but were restored for the 1995 "Final Cut".
4. Being a member of the "Bunch" was quite a family affair, as Tector (Ben Johnson) and Lyle (Warren Oates) Gorch were brothers. Which other two characters in the film were also related?

Answer: Clarence Lee and Freddie Sykes

Freddie Sykes (Edmond O'Brian, 1915-1985) was Clarence "Crazy" Lee's (Bo Hopkins) grandfather. After leaving Angel's village, Freddie asked Bishop if Crazy Lee "pulled his weight" during the bank robbery (Lee was left behind guarding the hostages while the rest of the "Bunch" made their escape, and was killed by Harrigan), and revealed to Bishop, for the first time, their relationship. Bishop recalled Lee's final words ("I'll hold 'em here 'til Hell freezes over or you say different") and assured Freddie that Lee did "just fine".
5. As guests of General Mapache, during which time they were making plans to steal the arms shipment, Bishop, Dutch, Angel and Freddie were seen drinking and relaxing in a steam-room. Lyle and Tector had other plans, however and, accompanied by three young senoritas, went off to search for another means to wash off the trail dust. Where did the five of them end up bathing?

Answer: In a wine vat

This scene was really the only one in the film with any substantial nudity involved (tame by today's standards, it was viewed as fairly graphic in 1969). It was considered as a contributing factor, (along with Angel's torture scene) as well as the film's themes and graphic violence, for the decision of the newly created MPAA (Motion Picture Association of America) to originally give "The Wild Bunch" an "X" rating (later amended to an "R" after the torture scene was cut from the original release).

This sequence also led into a rather humorous bit with an obviously intoxicated Lyle introducing the boys to his "fiance".
6. Even the darkest, most violent films find it necessary at times to have a moment or two of comedic levity, and "The Wild Bunch" was no exception. After the train robbery, the boys stopped for a well-deserved break and a quick taste of their favorite libation. The bottle was tossed about from man to man, each taking a generous swig. One poor member was deliberately ignored until the bottle was drained. Who never got to wet his whistle?

Answer: Lyle

This very lighthearted scene (at least for "The Wild Bunch") ended with Lyle (Warren Oates) holding on to the empty bottle, and the rest of the men sharing a good laugh at his expense. While it was never really specified, I believe this scene gave the audience a chance to take a deep breath and recover somewhat from the carnage it had been viewing, as well as to prepare for the visual onslaught still to come. Warren Oates' (1928-1982) film credits, along with the "Bunch", included "Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia" (also directed by Peckinpah), "Dillinger", "There Was a Crooked Man", "Stripes", as well as an impressive body of television work.
7. After the rifles were stolen from the train, the "Bunch" crossed a bridge that was rigged with dynamite, with Thornton and the posse in hot pursuit. Just before the bridge exploded (with the posse on it), Bishop and Thornton made eye contact, and Bishop offered Thornton a simple gesture. What was the gesture Bishop made?

Answer: He tipped his hat.

I'm not sure if this gesture was one of recognition, respect, or farewell, but it was beautifully timed with the explosion, and the posse's fall into the river. There was a very interesting (and somewhat humorous) sidebar regarding this scene that was documented by Peckinpah biographer Marshall Fine, concerning Bud Hulburd, the special-effects supervisor. Evidently, Hulburd did not achieve his position on the strength of his experience, but on the basis that there was no one left to do the job, as Peckinpah had fired the previous bosses. Obviously, the stuntmen who would be risking their lives were fairly concerned about this situation, enough so that Joe Canutt, one of the stuntmen involved, recruited screenwriter Gordon T. Dawson as a backup safety plan. Canutt ordered Dawson to stand behind Hulburd with a club while Hulburd was setting off the charges. If Hulbred miscalculated the timing of the explosions while the stuntmen were filming the scene, Dawson was to use the club to knock Hulbred out and prevent the final charge from going off. Luckily for all concerned, everything went according to plan, and the scene was filmed in one take (with the loss of one camera in the river).
8. After a heated and passionate discussion regarding his hatred for Mapache and the struggles his (Angel's) villagers were experiencing, Angel agreed to forfeit his share of the gold for the stolen rifles in exchange for another form of payment. What did Bishop and Dutch decide to give him?

Answer: A case of rifles

Angel was against joining Bishop and the men to steal the rifles for Mapache, as he knew the rifles would be used against his village, but "with guns, my people could fight! If I could take guns..I would go with you." It was Dutch who suggested that they give Angel a case of rifles in lieu of his share of gold. Bishop agreed, and included a case of ammunition as well.

Unfortunately, Mapache was informed of this arrangement by Teresa's mother (although Mapache believed Angel stole the rifles from Bishop), and later captured and tortured Angel as punishment. Angel's capture, and the subsequent rescue attempt by the surviving members of the "Bunch" (leading to the final battle) was, in Peckinpah's view, probably the most important theme of the film.

As explained in "The Wild Bunch: An Album in Montage", he wanted to tell a story about a group of bad men risking everything, even their lives, in a hopeless attempt to help a friend. "What kind of men would do that?" Peckinpah asked in the documentary, and by his own admission, the primary theme of the film was the attempt to answer that question.
9. After the famous "Long Walk" scene, Bishop, Dutch, Lyle, and Tector confronted Mapache with the intent to rescue Angel. What did Mapache do next, to cause Bishop to shoot and kill him, prompting the "Battle of Bloody Porch" shoot-out?

Answer: He slit Angel's throat.

At the beginning of the confrontation, Bishop informed a drunken Mapache and his men of their intentions ("We want Angel!"). Mapache appeared to agree to the demand, and dragged a beaten and bloody Angel to his feet and took hold of a knife, seemingly to cut the ropes that bound Angel's hands.

However, instead of freeing Angel, Mapache grabbed Angel by the hair and slit his throat. Bishop instantly responded by killing Mapache. Mapache's soldiers were frozen in shock, and there was a long pause before Dutch, Tector and Lyle actually started laughing. Bishop then turned around and killed Commander Mohr, Mapache's arrogant German advisor, which lead to the final, epic blood-bath.
10. The film ended with an exchange between Thornton and Freddie, outside of Mapache's stronghold, following the "Battle of Bloody Porch", and the off-screen ambush of the bounty hunters. What was the final line that Freddie said to Thornton?

Answer: "It ain't like it used to be, but it'll do."

Actually, all of these quotes were Freddie's. After the final gun-fight, Thornton and his men rode in to Mapache's stronghold, where the bounty hunters quickly collected the bodies of the "Bunch" and rode off again, eager to collect the reward money. Thornton took Bishop's pistol, and simply sat outside of the compound while survivors of the battle streamed by. Before long, shots were heard in the distance, and afterwards Freddie and a band of the rebel villagers rode up to Thornton. Freddie, surprised at seeing Thornton there, informed him that the "posse" didn't get far, a fact that Thornton was not surprised about. Freddie asked Thornton of his plans, and invited him to ride along with himself (Freddie) and the rebels.

This was simply a beautiful, bittersweet line to end the film. Thank you very much for playing, please rate if you have time.
Source: Author doorsfan58

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor skunkee before going online.
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