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Quiz about A Rumblin in the Land
Quiz about A Rumblin in the Land

A Rumblin' in the Land Trivia Quiz


Songs of dissent and rebellion have long been popular, sometimes sung openly and at other times only in trusted settings. Here are some songs for you to guess that might be better left unsung in front of an oppressive ruler.

A multiple-choice quiz by CmdrK. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
CmdrK
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
370,432
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
652
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: toddruby96 (5/10), Guest 142 (5/10), Hayes1953 (6/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. A song released during the Vietnam war was critical of those who had political or social connections that would get them exempted from having to serve in their country's armed forces. Which Creedence Clearwater Revival song was it?
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. "And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda" was a song written about a particular battle but also about romanticizing war in general. Which battle inspired the song?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Who gave us one of the earliest 1960s protest songs, "Blowin' in the Wind"?
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Ireland has been a hotbed of dissent and had a longing for independence. Which of these songs was about the Irish rebellion of 1798?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. An American anti-war song of the 1960s was entitled "I Ain't Marching Anymore". Who wrote and recorded it?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. While many protest songs of the 1960s were concerned with warfare, some commented on social ills. Who sang "A Rumblin' in the Land"?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. "Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye" was a song written about which conflict?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Who took "Eve of Destruction" to the top of the record charts in 1965? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Racial dissension in America led to a song by Gil Scott-Heron based on a 1960s Black Power slogan; which of these was it?
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. A song urging individual responsibility instead of being a pawn in warfare appeared in 1964. What was the name of the Buffy Sainte-Marie song?
Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Apr 06 2024 : toddruby96: 5/10
Mar 26 2024 : Guest 142: 5/10
Mar 25 2024 : Hayes1953: 6/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. A song released during the Vietnam war was critical of those who had political or social connections that would get them exempted from having to serve in their country's armed forces. Which Creedence Clearwater Revival song was it?

Answer: Fortunate Son

John Fogerty wrote "Fortunate Son" about the hypocritical nature of people who spoke in support of war and patriotism but looked for ways to exempt themselves or their family members from serving in the military.
2. "And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda" was a song written about a particular battle but also about romanticizing war in general. Which battle inspired the song?

Answer: Gallipoli

Eric Bogle wrote the song in 1971 about a young Australian who was recruited into his country's army in 1915. The soldier was sent to Turkey where the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) was badly defeated at Sulva Bay on the Gallipoli peninsula. Years later, the soldier, having lost both legs in the battle, reminisced while watching an ANZAC Day parade: "The young people ask 'what are they marching for', and I ask myself the same question".
3. Who gave us one of the earliest 1960s protest songs, "Blowin' in the Wind"?

Answer: Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan's three-verse song "Blowin' in the Wind" was recorded in 1962 and released in 1963. Its rhetorical nature asked seemingly simple, yet actually complex, questions about freedom and war, subjects often sung about by Dylan's hero, Woody Guthrie. Though it raised awareness of Dylan as a writer and singer, it was Peter, Paul and Mary's version of the song which was the real hit record and further propelled Dylan into the spotlight.
4. Ireland has been a hotbed of dissent and had a longing for independence. Which of these songs was about the Irish rebellion of 1798?

Answer: The Rising of the Moon

The 1798 uprising of United Irish rebels against The Kingdom of Ireland and the Kingdom of Great Britain was crushed with somewhere between ten-thousand and fifty-thousand rebels and civilians killed. The song called for men to gather at a secret place in preparation for battle with their pikes (a long pole with a metal spike on the end) on their shoulders at moonrise (to fight against soldiers armed with guns). "The Rising of the Moon" was written circa 1865 to provide inspiration for those who would engage in the Fenian Rising of 1867; those rebels were also beaten by the British.
5. An American anti-war song of the 1960s was entitled "I Ain't Marching Anymore". Who wrote and recorded it?

Answer: Phil Ochs

You rarely had to interpret Phil Ochs' lyrics, he usually said what he thought. "I Ain't Marching Anymore" was a look at the history of wars in the United States and what Ochs considered the folly of it. Released in 1965, it was considered his signature song.
6. While many protest songs of the 1960s were concerned with warfare, some commented on social ills. Who sang "A Rumblin' in the Land"?

Answer: Tom Paxton

From his 1964 album "Ramblin' Boy", Tom Paxton's "A Rumblin' in the Land" took a look at the downtrodden, the cheated, those put out of work by technological advances. It echoed themes in songs by Woody Guthrie and the writings of John Steinbeck from the 1930s, brought up to date with 1960s issues.
7. "Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye" was a song written about which conflict?

Answer: The Kandyan Wars

The song is in reference to the Kandyan Wars between Britain and the Kingdom of Kandy in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) between 1796 and 1818. In the song, Johnny the soldier returned home to Ireland with an eye and both arms and legs missing to be seen by his former lover who uttered the title of the song.
8. Who took "Eve of Destruction" to the top of the record charts in 1965?

Answer: Barry McGuire

Los Angeles recording session guitarist P.F. Sloan wrote "Eve of Destruction" in July, 1965. Critical of war, civil unrest and racial injustice, the song was recorded with Barry McGuire singing the lyrics. Supposed to be an initial version of the song with a more polished one to follow, someone gave a copy of the record to a disc jockey who started playing it right away.

It became a number one song on the "Billboard Hot 100". The song had originally been offered to The Byrds, who rejected it.
9. Racial dissension in America led to a song by Gil Scott-Heron based on a 1960s Black Power slogan; which of these was it?

Answer: The Revolution Will Not be Televised

Credited as being influential to the beginnings of Hip Hop, "The Revolution Will Not be Televised" was on Gil Scott-Heron's first album in 1970 and released as the B-side of a 1971 song of his, "Home Is Where the Hatred Is". It dealt with the media being controlled by white corporations and the need for people to decide they want change to take place before it can happen.
10. A song urging individual responsibility instead of being a pawn in warfare appeared in 1964. What was the name of the Buffy Sainte-Marie song?

Answer: Universal Soldier

"Universal Soldier" was written by Buffy Sainte-Marie as a protest about men going to war simply because that was the way it had been done for centuries and urged them to think for themselves instead of readily killing each other. The song found great popularity when Donovan recorded it in 1965 and made a hit record of it.
Source: Author CmdrK

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