Quiz about Turning Crawley Blue One Plaque at a Time
Quiz about Turning Crawley Blue One Plaque at a Time

Turning Crawley Blue, One Plaque at a Time Quiz


Like many parts of the country, the town of Crawley in Sussex has a number of blue plaques commemorating people who have associations with the town.

A multiple-choice quiz by paper_aero. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
paper_aero
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
406,181
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
139
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. This lady was born in the Victorian era and became an electrical engineer. Her blue plaque is appropriately placed on the wall of the electrical distribution network operator on the road that shares her name. Who is she? Hint

Mabel Lucy Matthews
Eleanor Florence Rathbone
Gertrude Leverkus
Caroline Haslett

2. On the cottage between Ifield Parish church and the Plough Inn, a noted Quaker is commemorated. The connection between the location and the individual is that they held a reading at the pub in the 1837. Who was this advocate for prison reform? Hint

John Howard
Dorothea Dix
Samuel June Barrows
Elizabeth Fry

3. On an otherwise unremarkable street in the West Green neighbourhood there is a plaque to the poet Francis Thompson. Which of the following is one of his poems? Hint

The Hound of Heaven
The Tay Bridge Disaster
If
Ode to a Small Lump of Green Putty I Found in My Armpit

4. According to the blue plaque, which play did Frederick Knott write whilst living at his parents' house in Langley Lane? Hint

Ordeal by Innocence
Death at the Vicarage
Dial M for Murder
After the Funeral

5. This blue plaque is for a landscape gardener, the third of four generations with the same name. The gardens at Milton Mount were laid out by him including the use of an artificial rock product invented by his father. Who is the gentleman? Hint

Eleanore Coade
James Pulham
Frederick Ransome
Alfred Ringwood

6. Outside of Crawley the name John Goepel is almost certainly unknown. Even within Crawley he isn't widely known. However, many residents see the results of his actions every day. What is his blue plaque for? Hint

Architect of town hall
Street naming
First mayor of the New Town
Notorious one-way system

7. In 2018 Crawley Museum moved to a building called "The Tree". The oldest part of this building was once home to a medical student, John Leech. He is better known as an illustrator of stories written by which Victorian author? Hint

Geoffrey Chaucer
A.A. Milne
Charles Dickens
Jane Austen

8. This blue plaque remembers Philip Webb. An architect he lived the last 15 years of his life in what is now Crawley. Which of the following did he co-found with William Morris? Hint

Weald and Downland Living Museum
National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty
Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings
Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission for England

9. On the side of what used to be the Co-op department store in the centre of Crawley is a sculpture, titled "Family Group". This was erected in 1959 as a symbol of the New Town of Crawley. Lower down is a blue plaque for the sculptor, whose name is? Hint

Lucian Hester
Mark Lemon
Sarah Robinson
Richard Browne

10. This person was notorious for his use of speed although it didn't kill him. His plaque is in the local woodlands, beside a lake. Can you identify him from this list? Hint

Billy Monger
Malcolm Campbell
Barry Sheene
John George Haigh


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This lady was born in the Victorian era and became an electrical engineer. Her blue plaque is appropriately placed on the wall of the electrical distribution network operator on the road that shares her name. Who is she?

Answer: Caroline Haslett

Dame Caroline Haslett was born in Worth. At the time the village of Worth was not part of Crawley and wasn't even the next settlement. Three Bridges stood in between. Following World War 2 when Crawley New Town was created from the existing towns and villages both Three Bridges and Worth became part of Crawley.

During World War 1, Dame Haslett learnt electrical engineering. She saw electrical devices as a way to relieve the drudgery of women. However it is the safety standards of UK household electronics that probably constitutes her greatest contribution to the day to day life of most people.

In Crawley, the road named in her honour, Haslett Avenue, originally ran from Three Bridges railway station to Crawley High Street. I put that statement in the past tense as when the shopping centre, County Mall, was built in the early 1990s the road was split in two, Haslett Avenues East and West. The plaque is close to Three Bridges railway station along Haslett Avenue East, on the wall of the electrical distributor. The company operating it may change but the infrastructure will remain at the same location.
2. On the cottage between Ifield Parish church and the Plough Inn, a noted Quaker is commemorated. The connection between the location and the individual is that they held a reading at the pub in the 1837. Who was this advocate for prison reform?

Answer: Elizabeth Fry

All of the options are people noted as campaigners for prison reform but the one who held what the blue plaque describes as "a satisfactory reading with the people" and whose visit is commemorated is Elizabeth Fry. At the time the village of Ifield was a separate entity from the market town of Crawley.

However, following the creation of Crawley New Town after World War 2 Ifield was subsumed into Crawley.
3. On an otherwise unremarkable street in the West Green neighbourhood there is a plaque to the poet Francis Thompson. Which of the following is one of his poems?

Answer: The Hound of Heaven

Francis Thompson was born in Lancashire, studied medicine in what is now Manchester University and spent some years living as an opium addict on the streets of London. After he submitted his poetry to a magazine called "Merrie England" the editors found him and arranged for him to live in a Catholic Priory in West Sussex. In the remainder of his life, he lived in various places before his early death in London at the age of 47. One of those places was just off Crawley High Street.

In case you are not familiar with the poem "The Hound of Heaven" the first few lines of are:
I fled Him, down the nights and down the days;
I fled Him, down the arches of the years;
I fled Him, down the labyrinthine ways
Of my own mind; and in the mist of tears

The poem is claimed to represent God trying to recover one who has fallen from grace, back into his family.

Of the other poems, "If" is a fairly well-known poem by Rudyard Kipling, "The Tay Bridge Disaster" by the renowned (for being bad) poet William McGonagall and the "Ode To A Small Lump of Green Putty I Found In My Armpit One Midsummer Morning" (to give it its full title) is referenced in the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams.
4. According to the blue plaque, which play did Frederick Knott write whilst living at his parents' house in Langley Lane?

Answer: Dial M for Murder

The play "Dial M for Murder" is the only work by Frederick Knott listed. The plaque is on the side of the Masonic Hall in Ifield as his parents' house no longer exists, but the site it stood on is close by. "Dial M for Murder" was originally written for the BBC before becoming a work for the stage. Subsequently, it was made into a film by Alfred Hitchcock. Another play by the same author was "Wait Until Dark" written after he moved to America.
The wrong answers are all novels by Agatha Christie.
5. This blue plaque is for a landscape gardener, the third of four generations with the same name. The gardens at Milton Mount were laid out by him including the use of an artificial rock product invented by his father. Who is the gentleman?

Answer: James Pulham

James Pulham set up the firm of landscape gardeners called James Pulham and Son. His son James Pulham created the artificial stone call Pulhamite. This was used in landscape gardening around the south-east of England but apparently, he kept the recipe secret and once he died no more Pulhamite could be made. The grandson of the founder, another James Pulham laid out the gardens at Milton Mount using Pulhamite. His son James, along with the three gentlemen already mentioned, all managed the firm in their turn. Milton Mount Garden is now a public park, Worth Park which forms part of the Pound Hill neighbourhood. It is also the home of Crawley Croquet Club.

The other names listed have also been involved with artificial stone. Alfred Edward "Ted" Ringwood led a team that invented Synrock, (short for synthetic rock). Eleanore Coade invented the ceramic Coade Stone and Frederick Ransome patented an artificial sandstone.
6. Outside of Crawley the name John Goepel is almost certainly unknown. Even within Crawley he isn't widely known. However, many residents see the results of his actions every day. What is his blue plaque for?

Answer: Street naming

Most towns grow piecemeal over time. Street naming is likewise done in small quantities or by using traditional names in the oldest parts of towns. This all goes out the window when planned new towns are built. All of a sudden several hundred street names are required, preferably avoiding duplications.

In Crawley a large chunk of this task fell to John Goepel. He retained the existing names of those streets that existed, used old field names where that was appropriate and then took themes for groups of streets. So in Tilgate for example, there are groups of streets named after English cathedral cities, explorers, writers and artists.
7. In 2018 Crawley Museum moved to a building called "The Tree". The oldest part of this building was once home to a medical student, John Leech. He is better known as an illustrator of stories written by which Victorian author?

Answer: Charles Dickens

The plaque reads in part, "John Leech who in 1843-48 illustrated the Christmas stories of Charles Dickens". He was also a well know illustrator for The London Charivari magazine, in turn better known as "Punch". The first editor of "Punch" was also a Crawley resident and is reputedly the first commuter into the bargain.
8. This blue plaque remembers Philip Webb. An architect he lived the last 15 years of his life in what is now Crawley. Which of the following did he co-found with William Morris?

Answer: Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings

Of the various buildings designed by Mr Webb, the only one I am familiar with is Standen House which is only 7 miles from the building his blue plaque is attached to. Standen is to the south of East Grinstead close to the Weir Wood Reservoir, although the reservoir didn't exist when the house was built.

The house is now owned by "The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty", or the National Trust as it is more commonly called. Philip Webb and William Morris were involved in a number of organisations in the late 19th century, including the Socialist League .

The one they are noted as having founded together and that is listed on the blue plaque, is the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings.
9. On the side of what used to be the Co-op department store in the centre of Crawley is a sculpture, titled "Family Group". This was erected in 1959 as a symbol of the New Town of Crawley. Lower down is a blue plaque for the sculptor, whose name is?

Answer: Richard Browne

The sculpture was commissioned by Crawley Arts Council to represent the community of Crawley which had increased 5 fold with the development of the New Town. Although the building is no longer the Co-op the sculpture is still there high up on the wall.

But now there is a concrete canopy outside the building, about 10 feet above the pavement, so if you can read the plaque you can't see the sculpture and vice versa. The sculpture can be seen by the simple expedient of crossing the road and looking back. All of the wrong answers also are people who have blue plaques in Crawley. Mark Lemon being the first editor of Punch magazine.
10. This person was notorious for his use of speed although it didn't kill him. His plaque is in the local woodlands, beside a lake. Can you identify him from this list?

Answer: Malcolm Campbell

Malcolm Campbell, sometime holder of world records for speed on both land and water, is the relevant gentleman. Apparently, he did flotation trials for his boat Blue Bird on what is officially known as Tilgate Lake. It has long been called Campbells Lake by us locals. Malcolm Campbell died from a stroke in 1948, his son Donald, who also achieved world records for speed, died in a high speed crash on Coniston Water.

Of the other options, Barry Sheene, the motorcycle racer lived in the village of Charlwood, which is close to Crawley in the 1980's. British Formula 4 racing driver Billy Monger was born in Charlwood. His racing career was ended after a crash that resulted in a double leg amputation. John George Haigh is also known as the Acid Bath Murderer. He committed several of his murders in Crawley shortly after the end of World War 2. Strangely no-one has seen fit to commemorate his connection to Crawley with a blue plaque.
Source: Author paper_aero

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor gtho4 before going online.
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