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Quiz about AZ of Neurology Part II
Quiz about AZ of Neurology Part II

A-Z of Neurology Part II Trivia Quiz


Here is part 2 of my A to Z of Neurology series. Actually it's K to V skipping Q and U, but that's creative licence for you.

A multiple-choice quiz by leith90. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
leith90
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
272,493
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
2657
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 70 (7/10), Murdox (8/10), japh (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Which K is a sign of meningitis or meningeal irritation? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Which L is found between the frontal temporal lobes of the brain? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Which M is the lowest part of the brain stem? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. N is for which supporting and insulating cells around neurones in the central nervous system? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Which structure contains the sensitive nerve terminals in the inner ear? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. The autonomic nervous system controls the visceral functions of the body. Which P is a major subdivision of this system? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. We'll skip Q and go to R.
What is a 'knee-jerk'?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Which S is the space between the axon of one neurone with the dendrites of another? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Which T is the important mass of nerve cells located in the very centre of the brain? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. We'll pass U and move on to V, which is the end of our quiz.
Which V is an agent or nerve that affects the calibre of blood vessels?
Hint



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Most Recent Scores
May 26 2024 : Guest 70: 7/10
May 09 2024 : Murdox: 8/10
May 03 2024 : japh: 7/10
Apr 16 2024 : PurpleComet: 7/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Which K is a sign of meningitis or meningeal irritation?

Answer: Kernig's sign

A tricky one to start with. Kernig's sign is when there is resistance to full extension of the leg at the knee, when the hip is flexed. Russian physician Vladimir Kernig first described the sign in 1882.
Kehr's sign is pain referred to the left shoulder indicating abdominal trauma or irritation.
Klumpke paralysis (also called Klumpke-Dejerine paralysis) is caused by an avulsion of C8 and T1 (the eighth cervical and first thoracic vertebrae). It is manifested by loss of function in the small muscles of the hand and the long finger flexors and extensors.
Krause's corpuscle is a somatic sensory nerve ending in the skin.
2. Which L is found between the frontal temporal lobes of the brain?

Answer: Lateral fissure

The lateral fissure is also known as the Sylvian fissure. It is the deep groove which extends along the lateral aspect of each cerebral hemisphere for about half of its length, between the frontal and temporal lobes.
The limbic system serves as a nervous system for emotional feelings and behaviour. It is a complex system of fibre tracts and grey matter encircling the upper part of the brain stem.
The lingual nerve is one of the branches of the mandibular nerve. It is joined by the chorda tympani, a branch of the facial nerve.
A lacuna is a small pit in part of the body. Lacunar infarctions are areas of brain which have died due to lack of blood and therefore oxygen. An obstruction of small branches of cerebral arteries by plaques of local atheroma or lipohyalinoid degeneration causes the infarctions distal to the blockage.
3. Which M is the lowest part of the brain stem?

Answer: Medulla oblongata

The medulla oblongata is situated between the pons and the upper portion of the spinal cord. It houses the nerve centres for both motor and sensory nerves. The intrinsic functions of breathing and heart rate are also controlled here.
The meninges are the three layers of membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord.
The myelin sheath is a lipid substance which surrounds the axons of certain nerve cells. This sheath is laid down by the Schwann cells.
The mesencephalon is also known as the midbrain. It is the uppermost portion of the brain stem and is divided into the cerebral peduncles and the tectum. The third and fourth cranial nerves originate in this area along with the aqueduct of Sylvius.
4. N is for which supporting and insulating cells around neurones in the central nervous system?

Answer: Neuroglia

The neuroglia support the neurones in place and insulate them to prevent signals from spreading between the neurones where this is not desired.
Nissl bodies are specialized endoplasmic reticulum in the cell body that synthesizes substances required to keep the cell alive.
Neurofibrils transport substances from the Nissl bodies to the axon and dendrites.
Noradrenaline (also called norepinephrine) is a synaptic transmitter substance secreted by the sympathetic and parasympathetic adrenergic nerve fibres. It is also manufactured synthetically for use as an inotropic agent.
5. Which structure contains the sensitive nerve terminals in the inner ear?

Answer: Organ of Corti

The organ of Corti contains a series of electromechanically sensitive cells called hair cells. These are the receptive end-organs that generate nerve impulses in response to sound vibration.
The obex is the name given to the flat band of tissue at the inferior angle of the fourth ventricle.
The operculum is simply a lid or covering. In this case it is the folds of the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes of the cerebrum overlying the insula.
The occipital lobe is the most posterior part of the cerebral hemisphere.
6. The autonomic nervous system controls the visceral functions of the body. Which P is a major subdivision of this system?

Answer: Parasympathetic nervous system

The parasympathetic nervous system fibres leave the central nervous system through the third, seventh, ninth and tenth cranial nerves and the second and third sacral spinal nerves. They also occasionally leave through the first and fourth sacral spinal nerves. About 75% of all parasympathetic nerves are in the vagus nerves.
The pyramidal tract is also known as the corticospinal tract and is the major output pathway from the motor cortex. 80% of these fibres cross to the opposite side of the body in the medulla.
The pituitary gland is also called the hypophysis. Together the anterior and posterior portions secrete eight essential hormones for the control of metabolic functions.
The paraterminal gyrus is part of the limbic system, the emotional centre of the brain.
7. We'll skip Q and go to R. What is a 'knee-jerk'?

Answer: Reflex

A reflex is simply a reflected action or movement. It is an involuntary action following immediately upon some stimulus, as in withdrawal of a limb from pain.
Receptors are the nerve endings of all sensory and autonomic neurones that receive stimuli for transmission.
Rhodopsin is the light-sensitive photochemical found in the rods in the retina.
Aging can result in a decline in mental function. Reactive synaptogenesis is the compensatory sprouting of dendrites by remaining neurones to maintain the total number of synaptic connections in the brain.
8. Which S is the space between the axon of one neurone with the dendrites of another?

Answer: Synapse

The synapse is the functional junction between two neurones. The nerve impulse from one axon is relayed across the gap by chemical transmitters to innervate the dendrites of the next neurone.
A sulcus is a name designating a linear depression, usually one separating the gyri of the brain.
The venous drainage of the cerebral cortex is into the superior sagittal sinus, which runs along the longitudinal fissure. From here the blood drains into the transverse sinus.
The sella turcica is a depression on the upper surface of the sphenoid bone. It houses the pituitary gland.
9. Which T is the important mass of nerve cells located in the very centre of the brain?

Answer: Thalamus

The thalamus acts as the chief relay station, directing sensory and other signals to appropriate areas of the brain.
The trochlear nerve is the fourth cranial nerve.
The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve.
The tentorium cerebelli is the tent-like fold of dura mater between the occipital lobes and the cerebellum. It extends in further to separate the cerebral hemispheres from the brain stem and cerebellum.
10. We'll pass U and move on to V, which is the end of our quiz. Which V is an agent or nerve that affects the calibre of blood vessels?

Answer: Vasomotor centre

The vasomotor centre is a control center in the medulla and pons of the brain stem. It transmits signals to the heart to increase pumping activity and to the blood vessels to constrict them. Acting together, these effects can increase blood pressure.
The vagus nerve is the tenth cranial nerve and has sensory, motor and parasympathetic branches.
Virchow's triad relates to thrombus formation.
The ventricular system is a system of four interconnected, fluid filled chambers in the centre of the brain. It is comprised of the two large lateral ventricles, the third and fourth ventricles, the intraventricular foramen (foramen of Monroe) and the cerebral aqueduct (aqueduct of Sylvius). At the base of the fourth ventricle two openings: the foramen of Magendie and the foramen of Luschka, open the system into the subarachnoid space and thereafter into the spinal cord.
Source: Author leith90

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor crisw before going online.
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