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Quiz about AZ of Neurology Part 1
Quiz about AZ of Neurology Part 1

A-Z of Neurology Part 1. Trivia Quiz


Don't be scared, they're only nerves. The questions in this quiz come from the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems.

A multiple-choice quiz by leith90. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
leith90
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
270,726
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
4517
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 5 (9/10), Murdox (9/10), Guest 69 (4/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. A is for what part of the neurone that carries impulses away from the cell body? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Which B is the name of the stem-like portion of the brain connecting the two cerebral hemispheres to the spinal cord? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Which C is the convoluted grey matter on the outer surface of the cerebral hemispheres? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Which D is for the threadlike extensions of neurone cytoplasm? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. This E is for a disease that causes excessive electrical activity in the brain. Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Which F is the fold of dura mater separating the two cerebral hemispheres? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. This G is the ninth cranial nerve. Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Which H is a paralysis that affects half of the body? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. I is for the islands of Reil. What is their other name, also beginning with I? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Which J form of epilepsy is marked by localized spasms?
Hint



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. A is for what part of the neurone that carries impulses away from the cell body?

Answer: Axon

Axons are usually coated in a white fatty substance called the myelin sheath which helps to speed the passage of impulses. They are sometimes called axones.
An aqueduct is a canal or passage. There are two in the brain: the Sylvian aqueduct and the Cerebral aqueduct.
The arachnoid is the delicate middle layer of the meninges. Its fine web-like appearance gives rise to its name.
An aneurysm is a sac formed by a dilation in a vessel wall, usually an artery.
2. Which B is the name of the stem-like portion of the brain connecting the two cerebral hemispheres to the spinal cord?

Answer: Brain stem

The brain stem is comprised of three portions: the pons, the midbrain and the medulla oblongata. This area is responsible for regulating vital functions such as breathing and heart rate. The 12 cranial nerves originate in the brain stem.
The base of skull is the bottom of the cranium.
The basal ganglion is associated with motor function. It provides a pathway between and assists in processing information from the cerebral cortex and the thalamus.
Bachmann's bundle is a conduction pathway in the heart.
3. Which C is the convoluted grey matter on the outer surface of the cerebral hemispheres?

Answer: Cerebral cortex

The cerebral cortex is also called the grey matter because the axons here are de-myelinated, which means they do not have the white myelin sheath surrounding them.
The cerebrum is the main portion of the brain, with the two hemispheres connected by the corpus callosum. It forms the largest part of the central nervous system.
The cavernous sinus is a venous channel, situated in the middle of the brain. It connects to the transverse sinus and the internal jugular veins.
4. Which D is for the threadlike extensions of neurone cytoplasm?

Answer: Dendrites

The dendrites form most of the receptive surface of the neurone. They carry information and impulses to the cell body.
The diencephalon is the posterior part of the forebrain and consists of the hypothalamus, thalamus and epithalamus.
A dendraxon is a neurone whose axon splits into terminal filaments immediately after leaving the cell.
The dura mater is the toughest, outermost layer of the meninges.
5. This E is for a disease that causes excessive electrical activity in the brain.

Answer: Epilepsy

Epilepsy needs no introduction, but did you know there are many different types of epilepsy? Tonic/Clonic seizures (previously called Grand Mal) are the most easily recognized.
An encephalopathy is any permanent or transient cerebral dysfunction.
An end plate is a flattened, discoid expansion at the myoneural junction, where a myelinated nerve fibre joins a skeletal muscle fibre.
The encephalon is the central nervous system and comprises the brain and spinal nerves.
6. Which F is the fold of dura mater separating the two cerebral hemispheres?

Answer: Falx cerebri

Tricky one- sorry. The falx cerebri is in the horizontal fissure between the two cerebral hemispheres and the falx cerebelli is the fold of dura mater that separates the two cerebellar hemispheres.
The foramen magnum sounds like an ice cream, but it is actually a large opening in the anterior part of the occipital bone, between the cranial cavity and the spinal cord.
The frontal lobe is the anterior lobe of the brain.
7. This G is the ninth cranial nerve.

Answer: Glossopharyngeal

The glossopharyngeal nerve supplies the mucous membranes and carotid sinus, and the muscles of the pharynx, soft palate and posterior third of the tongue. It allows taste in that portion of the tongue and is also necessary for swallowing and speech. Stimulation of this nerve incites a gag reflex as some people have discovered after a big night out!
There are two types of Golgi neurones: the first have long axons which leave the grey matter, traverse the white matter and end in the peripheries. The second have short axons in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices.
A ganglion is a collection of nerve cells and fibres forming an independent nerve centre. They are found in the sympathetic nervous system.
A gyrus is one of many convolutions of the surface of the brain and they are separated by fissures and sulchi.
8. Which H is a paralysis that affects half of the body?

Answer: Hemiplegia

This paralysis is usually due to a cerebral disease. The paralysis is manifested on the opposite side of the body to the lesion that caused it. This is because the pyramidal fibres from each cerebral hemisphere cross in the medulla oblongata.
Hydrocephalus is a build up of CSF around the brain and spinal cord. Also called 'water on the brain'.
The hypothalamus is a portion of the brain, lying beneath the thalamus at the base of the brain. It is closely linked to the pituitary and together they are responsible for the integrated functioning of the nervous and endocrine systems.
The hypoglossal nerve is the twelfth cranial nerve. It supplies the base of the tongue and is partly responsible for swallowing and phonation.
9. I is for the islands of Reil. What is their other name, also beginning with I?

Answer: Insula

The insula is a triangular area of the cerebral cortex that forms the floor of the lateral cerebral fossa.
Impulses are the electrochemical processes transmitted along the nerve fibres.
Innervation related to the distribution or supply of nerves and energy to a body part.
An interneuron is a neurone between the primary afferent neurone and the final motor neurone.
10. Which J form of epilepsy is marked by localized spasms?

Answer: Jacksonian

Jacksonian epilepsy is named after British neurologist John Jackson, whose studies of brain injuries helped define modern neurology. This form of epilepsy is characterized by clonic movements in one muscle group, which then spreads to adjacent groups. For example, it may start as twitches in the left hand, which spread to the forearm, then upper arm and so on.
Jennerian relates to Edward Jenner, who developed vaccination.
Juxtaspinal refers to an area near the vertebral column.
Jactitation is the restless tossing to and fro in acute illness.
Source: Author leith90

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor crisw before going online.
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