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Quiz about Making More Change
Quiz about Making More Change

Making More Change Trivia Quiz


Have another go at matching different countries' units of currency with what they are divided into for coinage. For instance: British Pound --> Penny

A matching quiz by reedy. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
reedy
Time
3 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
404,583
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
419
Last 3 plays: dukejazz (10/10), Retired2006 (10/10), rivenproctor (8/10).
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. Macanese pataca  
  Kopiyka
2. Nepalese rupee  
  Avo
3. Omani rial  
  Sene
4. Panamanian balboa  
  Kopek
5. Qatari riyal  
  Ngwee
6. Russian ruble  
  Diram
7. Samoan tālā  
  Baisa
8. Tajikistani somoni  
  CentÚsimo
9. Ukrainian hryvnia  
  Paisa
10. Zambian kwacha  
  Dirham





Select each answer

1. Macanese pataca
2. Nepalese rupee
3. Omani rial
4. Panamanian balboa
5. Qatari riyal
6. Russian ruble
7. Samoan tālā
8. Tajikistani somoni
9. Ukrainian hryvnia
10. Zambian kwacha

Most Recent Scores
Dec 07 2023 : dukejazz: 10/10
Nov 23 2023 : Retired2006: 10/10
Nov 21 2023 : rivenproctor: 8/10
Oct 28 2023 : Jaydel: 10/10

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Macanese pataca

Answer: Avo

The pataca first appeared in 1894 when Macau was a Portuguese colony, replacing the Portuguese real. Other currencies were still commonly in use in Macao at the time, so in 1906, the first official Macanese paper currency was issued. Coins would not be minted until 1952, at which point all denominations below 10 patacas were replaced by coins (5, 10, 50 avos, and 1 and 5 patacas)

The current denominations, established in 1982, have coinage in the denominations of 10, 20 and 50 avos, along with 1, 2, 5 and 10 patacas. Banknotes are issued in denominations of 10, 20, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 patacas.
2. Nepalese rupee

Answer: Paisa

The Nepalese rupee was introduced in 1932 in what was then the Kingdom of Nepal. Prior to 1932 (for nearly three centuries), the unit of currency was the mohar. Under different kings, the currency saw changes and reissues, but the biggest changes came in 2007 in anticipation of the change of government to a republic, and images and references to the kingdom were altered.

Most of the banknotes were updated again in 2012 to include English and the year of issue.

Nepalese coins come in the following denominations: 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 paisa, and 1, 2, 5, and 10 rupees. The 1 and 2 rupee coins are most commonly used, with they others only rarely.

Banknotes are issued in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 rupees.
3. Omani rial

Answer: Baisa

A number of different currencies circulated in the Arabian Peninsula following the establishment of a British presence in the mid 19th century, but in 1970, the Saidi rial (named for the ruling Sultanate of Oman) was established, divided into 1000 baisa. Just two years later (after a coup d'Útat), the currency was changed to the Omani rial.

Coins in circulations (most since 1999) include 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 baisa, along with 1/4 and 1/2 rial.

Banknotes include 100 and 200 baisa, as well as 1/2, 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 rials.
4. Panamanian balboa

Answer: CentÚsimo

After seceding from Colombia in 1903, Panama established its own currency the next year, naming it after the Spanish conquistador Vasco N˙˝ez de Balboa.

With one balboa divided into 100 centÚsimos, coins are minted in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 25 (un cuarto) and 50 centÚsimos, along with 1 balboa.

There are no Panamanian balboa banknotes printed; they use U.S. dollars instead, with a 1:1 value ratio. That said, prices in Panama are still quoted as being in balboas, which can be confusing for visitors.
5. Qatari riyal

Answer: Dirham

The Qatari riyal had its beginnings in the 1966 after the devaluation of the Gulf rupee by India. Qatar began using the Saudi riyal, but very quickly entered into the 'Qatar-Dubai Currency Agreement' and they shared a currency (appropriately called the Qatar and Dubai riyal) until Dubai joined the U.A.E. in 1972. From 1973 on, Qatar has had its own currency, the Qatari riyal.

Coins in Qatar are minted in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 dirhams, while banknotes were originally issued in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 100, and 500 riyals, with a 50 riyal note added in 1976. In 2020, a 200 riyal denomination was also added.
6. Russian ruble

Answer: Kopek

The ruble has been the currency in Russia since the 14th century, from Imperial Russia, through Soviet Russia, and into the most recent Russian Federation. The modern version of the ruble was created in 1991 with the dissolution of the Soviet Union, with the Soviet ruble being phased out by 1993.

An updated currency (the second ruble) came to be through monetary reform in 1998, and the coins minted at that time were in the following denominations: 1, 5, 10 and 50 kopeks, along with 1, 2, 5 and 10 rubles. Since then, the kopek coins have stopped being minted, and are rarely used.

Banknotes come in denominations of 5, 10, 50, 100, 500, 1000 and 5000 rubles, although the 5 and 10 ruble denominations are rarely used, and are also no longer printed.
7. Samoan tālā

Answer: Sene

From 1914 until 1967, Western Samoa used the same currency as New Zealand (the pound). When New Zealand decimalized its currency in 1967 (becoming the New Zealand dollar), Samoa (which had gained independence from New Zealand in 1962), decided to establish its own currency, which was dubbed the tālā, divided into 100 sene.

The original minting included denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 and 50 sene, and $1 tālā. In 2011, the 1, 2 and 5 sene coins were withdrawn from circulation, and a $2 tālā coin was introduced.

Samoan banknotes were originally printed in denominations of $1, $5 and $10 tālā. In 1990, the $1 tālā bill was discontinued, and $50 and $100 tālā bills were added. The 2008 run added a $20 tālā bill as well.
8. Tajikistani somoni

Answer: Diram

Following the fall of Soviet Russia, Tajikistan established the Tajikistani ruble (divided into 100 tanga), which was used from 1995 until the year 2000. In 2000, after rampant inflation made the new ruble unstable, they established the somoni (divided int 100 dirams).

Coins minted in 2001 came in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 25 and 50 dirams, plus 1, 3 and 5 somoni. In 2011, 1 and 2 diram coins were added.

Banknotes were originally issued in denominations of 1, 5, 20 and 50 dirams, with 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 somoni. In 2010, a 3 sonomi bill was added, as well as 200 and 500 somoni denominations.
9. Ukrainian hryvnia

Answer: Kopiyka

Another currency established after the fall of Soviet Russia, the hryvnia became Ukraine's official currency in September of 1996, dividing into 100 kopiyok.

(Grammar note - hryvnia (singular), hryvni (nominative plural), hryven (genitive plural, kopiyka (singular), kopiyky (nominative plural), kopiyok (genitive plural))

The original 1996 coins were issued in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 25 and 50 kopiyok, with 1 hryvnia. In 2018 a 2 hryvnia coin was added, and a year later, the 1, 2 and 5 kopiyka coins were withdrawn from circulation.

The initial run of banknotes included 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 hryven, with higher denominations being added in 2001 (200 hryven), 2006 (500 hryven), and 2019 (1000 hryven).
10. Zambian kwacha

Answer: Ngwee

When the Republic of Zambia was transformed from Northern Rhodesia in 1964 following its independence from the United Kingdom, the Bank of Zambia introduced its new currency in 1966, replacing the pound with the kwacha (divided in to 100 ngwee).

The first minting of coins included denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 ngwee. A 50 ngwee coin was added in 1979, and a 1 kwacha coin appeared in 1989. A new set of coins was issued in 1992 with denominations of 25 and 50 ngwee and brass 1, 5 and 10 kwacha, then again in 2013 with denominations of 5, 10, 50 ngwee and 1 kwacha.

The first issue of banknotes came in denominations of 50 ngwee, and 1, 2, 10 and 20 kwacha.

After a number of changes, the 2013 issue of banknotes covers denominations of 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 kwacha.
Source: Author reedy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor stedman before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
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