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Quiz about Animal Hodgepodge
Quiz about Animal Hodgepodge

Animal Hodgepodge Trivia Quiz


Here is a quiz to test your knowledge of an assortment of animals. So sit back, relax and delve into a world where the wild things are.

A multiple-choice quiz by poshprice. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
poshprice
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
305,302
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
11171
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: whistledown (5/10), Devmac (7/10), Guest 75 (8/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Otters are able to close their ears and nostrils in order to prevent water from entering them.


Question 2 of 10
2. Why do flies rub their legs together?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. How do male peacocks attract a mate?
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. How did the golden eagle get its name?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Porcupines found in North and South America cannot climb trees.


Question 6 of 10
6. Which of the following is responsible for causing the holes often found in woollen clothing?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. What is a pangolin?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. When feeding, the flamingo uses its bill as a sieve, in order to dispose of the water that contains its food.


Question 9 of 10
9. If ingested, which of the following is poisonous to guinea pigs?
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. The fish we now call the goldfish originated in China during the Tang Dynasty. Their gold colour was actually the result of a genetic mutation. What colour were they originally?
Hint



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Otters are able to close their ears and nostrils in order to prevent water from entering them.

Answer: True

Otters not only live close to water, but also spend a great deal of time in it. Their bodies have adapted to this purpose, making them expert swimmers and divers. They have small, flat heads, and long, thick necks and tails. They also have special muscles which enable them to close their ears and nostrils in order to stop water from getting in.

They have elastic webbing in between their toes, and long, coarse outer hair, which acts as a defensive barrier, protecting the short fur underneath. This furry undercoat traps air and keeps their skin dry, whilst a layer of fat beneath the skin helps shield them from the cold.
2. Why do flies rub their legs together?

Answer: In order to rid themselves of any foreign matter that may be stuck there

When flies rub their legs together, they are simply cleaning themselves. They use their legs to scrape off unwanted material or residue that has gathered there. Although there are insects, (such as the mayfly and the dragonfly), which have "fly" in their name, not all of these are considered "true" flies. The reason for this is that "true" flies are defined as insects which have a single pair of wings.

One of the most recognisable flies is the common housefly. Although it does not bite living things, it can still be dangerous, as it carries bacteria that causes disease. It feeds by depositing drops of its own digestive fluid on its food, which may then go on to be eaten by humans. Disease can also be transmitted by the fly's body and feet. Indeed careless hygiene in the kitchen provides the common housefly with an abundance to eat. This, in turn, may result in human illness, which may vary from minor afflictions such as an upset tummy, to something much more serious, like cholera, or even typhoid fever.
3. How do male peacocks attract a mate?

Answer: By calling, showing off their feathers and parading in front of the peahen

The old expression, "as proud as a peacock", certainly rings true when it comes to discussing the mating rituals of the peacock. First and foremost, it is important to note that it is the male peacock who has the extravagant and brightly coloured tail feathers, and not the peahen.

Moreover these feathers are a crucial part of the mating ritual, as they help the male to find a mate. When that time comes, he goes to his mating spot, (which is the same place every year), and calls loudly until a peahen appears. Once one (or more) appears, the male will then proceed to spread his feathers into a dazzling fan and parade himself in front of the peahen, in an attempt to impress her. Peacocks with particularly extravagant plumage are more likely to find a mate, and while some will attract many peahens, others will attract none.
4. How did the golden eagle get its name?

Answer: Due to the colour of the feathers on its head and neck

The feathers at the head and nape of the golden eagle's neck are a golden brown colour, and this is how it got its name. It is a large bird of prey, and in the UK, only the white-tailed eagle surpasses it in size. Moreover the females are usually quite a bit larger than the males. Various subspecies of the golden eagle exist in different parts of the world, and each of these differ slightly in terms of size and feathers. Golden eagles usually mate for life and invest a lot of time in nurturing and bringing up their young.

They can cover vast areas of ground and can glide downwards at speeds of up to 120mph before sweeping gracefully back up again.
5. Porcupines found in North and South America cannot climb trees.

Answer: False

The porcupine is a small mammal with long, soft hairs on its back, combined with strong, stiff, needle-like quills. These quills also cover the porcupine's sides and tail, forming a defence mechanism against predators. These prickly needles lay flat until the porcupine feels threatened, but as soon as a threat is detected, they stand up straight, and become rigid.

There are around 24 species of porcupine, and while all boast the same needle-like quills, there can be subtle differences between them. Porcupines found in North and South America for example, can actually climb trees, and their tails have even adapted to help them do so.

These porcupines have large, flat paws and claws, and these, along with their tails help them to grip trees, thus aiding their climbing.
6. Which of the following is responsible for causing the holes often found in woollen clothing?

Answer: The larvae of the adult clothes moth

Tineola bisselliella, otherwise know as the webbing, or common clothes moth, is often blamed for the "moth holes" that sometimes appear in people's clothing. However, the adult clothes moth is not actually responsible for the destruction of our clothing; it is actually their offspring, the larvae, that does the damage.

The common clothes moth only lives to mate and lay eggs, and then it dies. It is when the young moth is in the caterpillar (larvae) stage that the damage is done. The female adult moth lays its eggs on woollen fabrics, and once these have hatched the caterpillars create tubular cocoons out of the fabric, before lining it with silk.

They then feed off the fabric until they have consumed enough for the pupae phase to begin. No fabric is consumed during this stage of development, as the creature is well on its way to becoming an adult moth. Once this happens, its first instinct is to find a mate and produce offspring, and so the same cycle is repeated once again.
7. What is a pangolin?

Answer: A nocturnal mammal which resembles both the anteater and the armadillo

A pangolin is a species of animal which closely resembles the anteater and the armadillo. Like the anteater, the pangolin has a long narrow snout and tail, and a long tongue, which can stretch up to 16 inches. Although pangolins are sometimes referred to as scaly anteaters, their physical appearance also resembles that of the armadillo. For, like the armadillo, the pangolin has a hard outer coat, formed by overlapping horny scales. Anteaters on the other hand, are covered in coarse hair.

The pangolin is a nocturnal mammal, and spends most of the day curled up in a ball, asleep.

Its hard outer shell means that it is so heavily armoured that very few predators can cause it harm.
8. When feeding, the flamingo uses its bill as a sieve, in order to dispose of the water that contains its food.

Answer: True

Flamingos feed by dipping their heads in the water and swinging them back and forth. The edges of their bills are constructed in a way that allows them to filter the water, leaving behind the small invertebrates and vegetation on which they feed. Their large, fleshy tongues also aid them in this process, by pressing against the inside of their bills. This helps the flamingos to strain out water through the narrow crossway plates (lamellae) they have on the edges of their bills.
9. If ingested, which of the following is poisonous to guinea pigs?

Answer: Potato peel

There are various things which are poisonous to guinea pigs, and owners should be very careful when feeding them. Fresh grass hay, apples and carrots are all perfectly fine, but potato peel, rhubarb, monkshoot, and wild celery should never be given to guinea pigs to eat. Plants which grow from a bulb are also a definite no-no for guinea pigs, as they too are poisonous to them. Ideally, guinea pigs should be fed a balanced diet early on in their lives, as any changes to their food will not be well-received.

Indeed guinea pigs do not respond well to any change in diet, and have been known to starve, rather than eat the new food that has been provided for them.
10. The fish we now call the goldfish originated in China during the Tang Dynasty. Their gold colour was actually the result of a genetic mutation. What colour were they originally?

Answer: Silver

During the Tang Dynasty (618 - 907), some of the carp commonly kept in ponds started to show tinges of a mixture of yellow and gold, rather than their original silver colouring. This was due to a dominant genetic mutation, and promptly led to many more yellow and gold carp being bred than their silver coloured counterparts. They were often used for decoration, and if a household received guests, they would be taken from the pond and transferred into a small container, where the family could show them off.
Source: Author poshprice

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor crisw before going online.
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