Quiz about Canadian History for Kids
Quiz about Canadian History for Kids

Canadian History for Kids Trivia Quiz


Following on the heels of my quiz about the geography of Canada, is another about the history of Canada for kids. I hope you find it fun and informative.

A multiple-choice quiz by mayneeyak. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
mayneeyak
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
343,931
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
968
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 24 (9/10), Guest 71 (8/10), Guest 162 (6/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. In the 1500s, fur hats became very popular in Europe. This created a huge demand for imported pelts from which hard-working and industrious animal from Canada? Hint

beaver
polar bear
muskrat
arctic fox

2. Jeanne Sauve was the first Canadian female to hold what important position? Hint

Canada's Governor General
Head Janitor for Canada's House of Parliament
Top car buyer for Prime Minister
Zamboni driver for the Toronto Maple Leafs Hockey Club

3. This man was Canada's Prime Minister during WWII. What is his name? Hint

Gordon Meredith Lightfoot
Darryl Glen Sittler
Terrance Stanley Fox
William Lyon Mackenzie King

4. Which animal, hunted almost to extinction, was once the main source of food for the Blackfoot Indians of Canada? Hint

Bison
Sea Otter
Leatherback Turtle
Whooping Crane

5. Including the amateur era, which of the following two teams were Canada's first ice hockey teams to win a Stanley Cup Championship? Hint

Toronto Argonauts & Montreal Alouettes
Toronto Raptors & Vancouver Grizzlies
Toronto Blue Jays & Montreal Expos
Winnipeg Victorias & Montreal Hockey Club

6. What type of 'footwear', used specifically for winter travel, was invented by Canada's first native peoples? Hint

snowshoes
dog sled
snowmobile
toboggan

7. The world-famous Canadian, Rick Hansen, travelled around the world to raise money for spinal cord research. What made his trip extremely difficult? Hint

He almost drowned swimming across the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans
He made the entire trip walking on his hands
He completed the trip in a wheelchair
He became confused and went around the Great Wall of China 3 times

8. From 1920-1933, seven well known Canadians were known as "The Group of Seven". What was this group famous for doing? Hint

They built the CN Tower and the Skydome in 1920-1933
They were a female hockey team who won eight Stanley Cups
They were a group of talented landscape painters
They were seven Canadian men who were friends of Adolph Hitler

9. The name "Canada" was taken from the same Iroquois Indian word "canada". What does "canada" mean when translated to English? Hint

village
home of Santa Claus
big red leaf
lazy beaver

10. In 1917 during the first world war, a Canadian city was flattened when two ships collided in the harbour, causing a large fire which then caused an enormous explosion. Which city am I talking about? Hint

Whitehorse, Yukon Territories
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Fredericton, New Brunswick
Halifax, Nova Scotia




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In the 1500s, fur hats became very popular in Europe. This created a huge demand for imported pelts from which hard-working and industrious animal from Canada?

Answer: beaver

The under fur or wool (duvet) from Canadian beavers, consisted of barbed hairs that formed a durable, luxurious felt, and was of prime importance to the European hat industry until the 1830s, when silk hats became more fashionable. The beaver wool could easily be removed from the skins, which yielded a useful leather.
2. Jeanne Sauve was the first Canadian female to hold what important position?

Answer: Canada's Governor General

In 1984, Jeanne Sauve became the first female Governor General, as appointed by Queen Elizabeth II on the recommendation of Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau. She was the 23rd governor general since Canadian Confederation. One of the governor general's most important responsibilities is to ensure that Canada always has a prime minister and a government in place that has the confidence of Parliament.

In addition, the governor general holds certain reserve powers, which are exercised at his or her own discretion.
3. This man was Canada's Prime Minister during WWII. What is his name?

Answer: William Lyon Mackenzie King

William Lyon Mackenzie King, was born Dec 17,1874, and passed away on July 22, 1950, served as Canada's Prime Minister for twenty-two years in total. He served as the tenth Prime Minister of Canada from December 29, 1921 to June 28, 1926; from September 25, 1926 to August 7, 1930; and from October 23, 1935 to November 15, 1948. Gordon M. Lightfoot is a famous Canadian musician, Terrance (Terry) Fox was a one-legged athlete who was famous for his "Marathon of Hope" to raise money for cancer research.

He died before he was able to complete his run across Canada, and Darryl Sittler is a retired hockey player who owns the record for most points in one game with ten, six goals and four assists.
4. Which animal, hunted almost to extinction, was once the main source of food for the Blackfoot Indians of Canada?

Answer: Bison

Although all of the animals named are on the Canadian endangered species list, it is the North American bison, or buffalo, that was the main food staple for Canada's Blackfoot Indians up to the 1900s. At that time, the government made it illegal to hunt bison in all but a few areas of Canada. Now that the population is rebuilding, bison once again is becoming a red meat food source for all people who enjoy its delicious and healthy meat.
5. Including the amateur era, which of the following two teams were Canada's first ice hockey teams to win a Stanley Cup Championship?

Answer: Winnipeg Victorias & Montreal Hockey Club

I don't think I fooled any hockey fans with those answers. Of course it's the Winnipeg Victorias(1896) and the Montreal Hockey Club(1893). The Argonauts & Alouettes play football in the Canadian Football League, the Blue Jays & Expos are/were Major League baseball teams, while the Raptors & Grizzlies are/were National Basketball Association Teams.
6. What type of 'footwear', used specifically for winter travel, was invented by Canada's first native peoples?

Answer: snowshoes

The hint to this question is 'footwear'. Snowshoes represent the only choice that can be considered 'footwear'. Traditional webbed snowshoes, as we know them today, have a direct connection to Canada's indigenous people, e.g., the Huron, Cree, and so forth.

The famous explorer, Samuel de Champlain, wrote the following referencing the Huron and Algonquin First Nations, in his travel memoirs. "Winter, when there is much snow, they (the Indians) make a kind of snowshoe that are two to three times larger than those in France, that they tie to their feet, and thus go on the snow, without sinking into it, otherwise they would not be able to hunt or go from one location to the other".
7. The world-famous Canadian, Rick Hansen, travelled around the world to raise money for spinal cord research. What made his trip extremely difficult?

Answer: He completed the trip in a wheelchair

Rick performed the entire trip in a wheelchair. Richard M. Hansen,(b. Aug.26, 1957) is a Canadian Paralympian athlete and an activist/spokesperson for people with spinal cord injuries. Following a car crash at the age of 15, Hansen sustained a spinal cord injury that paralyzed him from the waist down.

The tour around the world was called "Man In Motion World Tour". It began in Vancouver, Canada in March 1985, was completed in twenty six months, covered 40,000 kilometres in thirty-four countries, and raised over twenty-six million dollars. ($26,000,000)
8. From 1920-1933, seven well known Canadians were known as "The Group of Seven". What was this group famous for doing?

Answer: They were a group of talented landscape painters

The "Group of Seven" were seven very talented Canadian men who painted beautiful pictures of Canadian landscapes. There never was a female hockey team who ever won the Stanley Cup, or a group of seven men known to be friends of Hitler, and the CN Tower and the Skydome(Rogers Centre) were built in the seventies and the eighties.

The Group of Seven, also know as the "Algonquin School", consisted of the seven artists; Franklin Carmichael, A.Y.Jackon, Lawren Harris, Arthur Lismer, Franzen Johnston, J.E.H.MacDonald, and Frederick Varley.

The Group of Seven is most best known for paintings inspired by the Canadian landscape, and they are credited with founding the first major Canadian national art movement.
9. The name "Canada" was taken from the same Iroquois Indian word "canada". What does "canada" mean when translated to English?

Answer: village

Until about 1950, the Mohawk word "kanata" was thought to be the origin of Canada's name. But the journal of Jacques Cartier about his voyage to present-day Quebec, Canada, in the 16th century, it shows Canada's name stems from the Saint-Lawrence Iroquoian word "canada", which holds the meaning, "village". This Iroquoian language was spoken by the inhabitants of Stadacona and the neighbouring region near present-day Quebec City in the 16th century, with words having similarities to those in related Iroquoian languages, most notably in Mohawk and Oneida.

Kanata, Ontario is the name of a former city, now part of the amalgamated city of Ottawa in Ontario, Canada, and is home to the NHL's Ottawa Senators playing in Scotiabank Place.
10. In 1917 during the first world war, a Canadian city was flattened when two ships collided in the harbour, causing a large fire which then caused an enormous explosion. Which city am I talking about?

Answer: Halifax, Nova Scotia

The Halifax explosion occurred Thursday, December 6, 1917, when the city of Halifax was devastated by the huge detonation of the SS Mont-Blanc, a French cargo ship, fully loaded with wartime explosives, which accidentally collided with the Norwegian ship, the SS Imo in "The Narrows" section of the Halifax Harbour. Nearly 2,000 people were killed by debris, fires, or collapsed buildings and it is estimated that over 9,000 people were injured.

The Halifax explosion remains the world's largest man-made accidental explosion nearly one hundred years later.
Source: Author mayneeyak

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