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Quiz about US Historical Sites
Quiz about US Historical Sites

US Historical Sites Trivia Quiz


This is a trip around the United States to historical sites and symbols.

A photo quiz by Rehaberpro. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
Rehaberpro
Time
3 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
370,966
Updated
Sep 26 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
3967
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 65 (5/10), Guest 75 (6/10), Guest 107 (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. This beautiful Washington D.C. monument is devoted arguably to one of the most popular of American presidents. Whose nineteen foot statue is the central focus? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Of course, this is the Statue of Liberty. Notice the tiny plane in the picture. It is flown by a former bicycle mechanic and aviation pioneer. Who was this man who gave many in New York City their first glimpse of a heavier-than-air craft? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Here is a view of the Hermitage but it is not in Russia. What famous American resided here? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Two bright lights penetrate the sky over New York City. Of what are the lights symbolic? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. On April 12, 1861 the first official shots were fired in the American Civil War. Fort Sumter was battered by Confederate cannon. Near what South Carolina city is Fort Sumter? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Pictured is a five cent coin with an image of Thomas Jefferson on the front. What was pictured on the back? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. General Antonio López de Santa Ana of Mexico declared victory at what Texas site on March 6, 1836? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. In the hills of southwestern Wisconsin lies this building designed and occupied by arguably the greatest American architect of his time. He called it 'Taliesin' or 'shining brow" as he meant it to be not on top of the hill but a part of it. Who was the architect? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Gutzon Borglum and his son, Lincoln Borglum, spent years carving the likenesses of four presidents into Mount Rushmore. Who was NOT one of the four? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. One of the iconic buildings that symbolizes the American government is the White House. Who was the first president to reside there? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This beautiful Washington D.C. monument is devoted arguably to one of the most popular of American presidents. Whose nineteen foot statue is the central focus?

Answer: Abraham Lincoln

Lincoln came to the White House emerging from a four-way split in race for president. He had served in the Congress, been an activist, at one time a Whig, and spoken out on the major issues of the time--state's rights and slavery. As a war time leader he displayed compassion, resolution, patience and diplomacy. His goal was always to unite the nation and foster equality.

After Lincoln's death there were numerous attempts in Congress to honor him with a memorial but they met with political opposition. Finally in 1913 President Taft chaired the committee tasked with deciding on the most suitable memorial and later signed the authorization. Henry Bacon acted as chief architect and Daniel Chester French sculpted the massive statue. The building featured huge Greek Doric columns. President Warren Harding dedicated it in 1922. The monument draws six million visitors a year, has no admission charge, and is open to the public twenty four hours a day.
2. Of course, this is the Statue of Liberty. Notice the tiny plane in the picture. It is flown by a former bicycle mechanic and aviation pioneer. Who was this man who gave many in New York City their first glimpse of a heavier-than-air craft?

Answer: Wilbur Wright

In 1909 Wilbur Wright took off on a windy day on a flight that lasted about five minutes. There had been prior publicity for the flight and New Yorkers gathered in anticipation. He flew over the ocean liner Lusitania and other watercraft and was greeted by the sounds of horns and noise-makers. He then headed for the Statue of Liberty. There were a lot of 'oohs and ahs' and the crowd below feared he might crash into it.

Just before the showpiece flight the plane had a modification. A canoe was attached underneath the plane in case of an emergency landing in the water. Wilbur did not expect to row away in the canoe but it was placed as a floatation device to give the pilot time to exit the plane. Wilbur also wore a life preserver.

Wilbur died in 1912 from typhoid fever contracted, it was believed, from eating contaminated shell fish. His brother Orville continued their work as pioneers in aviation.
3. Here is a view of the Hermitage but it is not in Russia. What famous American resided here?

Answer: Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson was really the first populist President of the United States, as those before were either wealthy land owners or had political connections. Jackson, too, became a rich landowner and slave owner but was born in modest circumstances. At the age of 13 during the American Revolution he was a courier and was captured and mistreated by the British. He served in the House of Representatives. Unaware that the War of 1812 had ended, he won the bloody Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815.

On the platform of presidential politics, Jackson felt that both John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay had denied him the office in 1824. He won in 1828 and defeated Henry Clay for the office in 1832. He came to Washington with scores of issues to settle and to establish what historians often refer to as "Jacksonian Democracy". As an example, he vetoed enactment of the Second National Bank as he said it was "subversive of the rights of the States, and dangerous to the liberties of the people". Jackson campaigned against the political spoils system, alienated the Northeastern powers in favor the West and South and made his appeals to the farming and laboring classes.

In 1804 he acquired the Hermitage, a 640-acre plantation near Nashville. The principle crop was cotton grown and harvested with slave labor. When he retired he came to the Hermitage for his final years. He is buried there along side his wife Rachel who was the victim of unfounded gossip.
4. Two bright lights penetrate the sky over New York City. Of what are the lights symbolic?

Answer: 9/11 Terrorist attacks

Americans were vaguely aware of terrorist activity around the world but were shocked by the suicide missions that destroyed the World Trade Center Twin Towers, damaged the Washington D.C. Pentagon office building, and killed the passengers in a crash in Pennsylvania, brought the ruthlessness of terrorist to the American conscience.

Osama bin Laden was the architect and probable financier of the venture. Years were spent tracking and killing him. Drastic changes came with the Homeland Security Act and security of domestic and foreign air travel.

The beams that you see were in cooperation of the Municipal Art Society of New York City and Con-Edison. Each bean is the effect of 44 searchlights or 88 in total. They are used mainly on the anniversary of 9/11. The energy used is expensive and prohibitive. The beams symbolize the Twin Towers from near ground zero. Sustained use confuses birds; some survivors and the families of those lost feel that the beams symbolize the buildings lost but not the lives lost.
5. On April 12, 1861 the first official shots were fired in the American Civil War. Fort Sumter was battered by Confederate cannon. Near what South Carolina city is Fort Sumter?

Answer: Charleston

General Pierre Gustave Toutant-Beauregard sent emissaries to Fort Sumter and demanded surrender of the Union forces there. Major Robert Anderson declined. Then began a thirty-four bombardment of the fort. The Confederates had fused shells that exploded; the Union had only old fashioned cannon that fired only solid iron cannon balls and did not have the range of Confederate equipment. This was due partly to President Buchanan's military cutbacks. Outmanned, Fort Sumter was surrendered and evacuated on April 13. Charleston residents sat on their porches and watched the fiery display while sipping cocktails and cheering. Union attempts on January 9 to re-enforce Sumter failed when the supply boat was turned around under the fire of cadets from the Citadel.

Construction began on Fort Sumter just after the War of 1812. It was still not fully finished in 1861. Its purpose was the guard Charleston Harbor against attack. Union attempts to dislodge the Confederates from Fort Sumter in 1863 failed.
6. Pictured is a five cent coin with an image of Thomas Jefferson on the front. What was pictured on the back?

Answer: Monticello

Of all American presidents Thomas Jefferson came closest to Plato's concept of the philosopher-ruler. He was a polymath in the arts, sciences, and politics. He could converse in six languages. On a tour of Monticello one can see many of his unique inventions. I was impressed with a study chair equipped with several candles so he could read into the night.

Jefferson's achievements are many. Among these were being the chief architect of the Declaration of Independence, serving as emissary to France, Vice President and Secretary of State. As the third president he authorized the Louisiana Purchase and sent Lewis and Clark on their exploration of the American West. In 1807 he signed a proclamation limiting the slave trade, although he retained his own slaves.

Monticello was his dream home that first began in 1775. He was its architect and reviser till his death. Much of his wealth he devoted to the establishment of the University of Virginia at Charlottesville. Jefferson used a telescope mounted at Monticello to oversee the construction. He would send messengers to the building site with orders or suggestions.

Monticello, in addition to the nickel coin, was used on the back of the now rarely used two dollar bill.
7. General Antonio López de Santa Ana of Mexico declared victory at what Texas site on March 6, 1836?

Answer: The Alamo

Santa Ana brought 1800 men to attack a mission defended by a rag tag group of soldiers, settlers, and adventures. The fighting spirit of those men is legend bordering on myth. The Mexicans lost an estimated 600 men. All of the 187 defenders of the Alamo died. Those few that surrendered were executed by Santa Anna.

Governor Sam Houston thought the Alamo was so under supplied and undermanned that he sent Jim Bowie to create a scorched earth tactic. However, Bowie joined the prevailing spirit of defending the mission. There have been a host of non-fiction books about the Alamo; and a host of often inaccurate films and television programs based on the personalities and careers of Jim Bowie and Davy Crockett.

The Alamo is the most visited historical site in present day Texas. Texas Legislature purchased the Alamo and declared it the official Texas State Shrine. Contrary to the movies, the Alamo does not rest in a picturesque plain but in downtown San Antonio. And you are unlikely to see "Across the alley from the Alamo, lived a pinto pony and a Navajo" as in the old Joe Greene song.

About a month later a force of Texans soundly defeated Santa Ana at Battle of San Jacinto, the turning point of the war.
8. In the hills of southwestern Wisconsin lies this building designed and occupied by arguably the greatest American architect of his time. He called it 'Taliesin' or 'shining brow" as he meant it to be not on top of the hill but a part of it. Who was the architect?

Answer: Frank Lloyd Wright

When Wright began building Taliesin, he told his wife in Chicago that he was building it for his mother and sister as a residence. In reality he was building it for his mistress. In spite of hostility from his neighbors, two massive fires, and five murders, the house survived and is now principally a tourist destination. Wright's 'prairie style' brought him fame and he rose in respect despite his several scandals.

He used it as a training program for fledging architects, many of whom were surprised when each had manual labor assignments as part of their duties.

As he grew older, he could no longer tolerate the harsh Wisconsin winters so he built Taliesin West in Arizona.
9. Gutzon Borglum and his son, Lincoln Borglum, spent years carving the likenesses of four presidents into Mount Rushmore. Who was NOT one of the four?

Answer: Franklin Delano Roosevelt

It was Theodore Roosevelt that was honored. Much of the work on Mount Rushmore was done during Franklin's tenure.

Washington was the father of his country and could have been king; Lincoln brought the warring states together; T. Roosevelt was a charismatic and independent leader.

Mount Rushmore is limited to four images. If there could be one other, who would it be? Franklin Roosevelt might lead the pack but some might say Wilson or Kennedy but conservatives might favor Reagan. The faces were completed between 1934 and 1939. Upon Gutzon Borglum's death, his son Lincoln Borglum took over. Dedication was on October 29, 1941.
10. One of the iconic buildings that symbolizes the American government is the White House. Who was the first president to reside there?

Answer: John Adams

The building of the White House began under the administration of George Washington but was not completed until late in the tenure of John Adams. Washington was not pleased with the initial design and said that it lacked sufficient space and adornment.

When Thomas Jefferson moved in 1801, he expanded the building outward with two colonnades. During the War of 1812, in 1814 the British set the White House ablaze. Although reconstruction began right away, it was not until 1817 that it became a livable residence for James Monroe. Several presidents have for various reasons added to the structure as the responsibilities of the president and the government has expanded.
Source: Author Rehaberpro

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