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Quiz about The Original Thirteen Colonies
Quiz about The Original Thirteen Colonies

The Original Thirteen Colonies Quiz


The 13 colonies were a group of settlements that became the original states of the United States of America. In 1776 the 13 colonies declared their independence from Great Britain. Can you name them?

A collection quiz by Terry. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
Terry
Time
3 mins
Type
Quiz #
413,854
Updated
Sep 22 23
# Qns
13
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
12 / 13
Plays
1537
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 65 (1/13), Guest 24 (8/13), Guest 107 (1/13).
Can you identify the original 13 US States?
There are 13 correct entries. Get 3 incorrect and the game ends.
Vermont Massachusetts Texas Kentucky Connecticut Washington DC Georgia New Jersey Indiana South Carolina New Hampshire West Virginia North Carolina California Illinois Michigan Tennessee Delaware Louisiana New York Maine Virginia Kansas Rhode Island Pennsylvania Iowa Maryland Ohio Hawaii Florida

Left click to select the correct answers.
Right click if using a keyboard to cross out things you know are incorrect to help you narrow things down.

Most Recent Scores
Jun 13 2024 : Guest 65: 1/13
Jun 12 2024 : Guest 24: 8/13
Jun 12 2024 : Guest 107: 1/13
Jun 12 2024 : Guest 98: 13/13
Jun 12 2024 : PLLLover: 13/13
Jun 11 2024 : Guest 73: 11/13
Jun 11 2024 : Guest 107: 13/13
Jun 11 2024 : Guest 173: 11/13
Jun 10 2024 : bernie73: 13/13

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
Answer:

The original 13 American colonies, established during the 17th and 18th centuries, played a pivotal role in shaping the United States as we know it today. Each colony had its own unique characteristics and history. For instance, Virginia, founded in 1607 at Jamestown, was the first permanent English settlement in North America and played a vital role in the development of representative government with the House of Burgesses in 1619. Massachusetts, settled by the Pilgrims in 1620, gave birth to the Massachusetts Bay Colony, known for the Puritan religious influence and the establishment of Harvard College in 1636. These early colonies laid the groundwork for the diverse cultural, political, and religious landscape of the United States.

The original 13 colonies spanned a vast geographical area, from the rugged, resource-rich New England region to the fertile plains of the Mid-Atlantic and the agricultural South. The Carolinas, for instance, were known for their large-scale rice and indigo plantations, while Georgia, established as a buffer against Spanish Florida, became a haven for debtors seeking a fresh start. The economies of these colonies varied significantly, leading to differing social structures and political ideologies. This diversity would ultimately contribute to the debates and compromises that shaped the nation's founding documents, such as the Constitution.

The American Revolution, which began in 1775, was a watershed moment in the history of the 13 colonies. Tensions had been simmering for years over issues like taxation without representation, and the colonies had increasingly sought autonomy. The Continental Congress, comprised of representatives from each colony, came together to declare independence from British rule in 1776. The subsequent war for independence, lasting until 1783, saw the 13 colonies transform into a united force, fighting for a common cause. After the American victory, the Treaty of Paris in 1783 officially recognized the sovereignty of the United States, marking the birth of a new nation that had emerged from the original 13 colonies. This revolutionary period solidified the ideals of liberty and self-governance that continue to shape the United States today.
Source: Author Terry

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