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Quiz about Stage Directing for Dummies
Quiz about Stage Directing for Dummies

Stage Directing for Dummies Trivia Quiz


As a drama teacher, I am frequently called upon to both direct and adjudicate plays at festivals and schools. Hopefully, this quiz will give you some tips on how to overcome some common problems with inexperienced actors.

A multiple-choice quiz by ferfer72. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
ferfer72
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
268,826
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
2313
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: PrairieRose78 (9/10), hilhanes (9/10), PurpleComet (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. A lot of first-time actors don't realize that they are hard to hear and see when they turn their backs to the audience. What is a "rule of thumb" to keep actors open to the audience? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Many new actors have trouble memorizing their lines. What is a good way to memorize a script? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Some actors are hard to hear because they just aren't speaking loudly enough. Which of these is NOT a possible physical contributor to this problem? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. If you want to feature an actor in the place the audience will look first (in the United States), where should you direct the actor to stand? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Directors need to tell students to go places like "upstage" and "downstage". Why were those directions named "up" and "down"? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Which of these steps is necessary before a young cast and crew rehearse on a stage? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Many theatre people have superstitions about what you can and cannot do in a theatre. Which of these is NOT a common superstitious practice around a stage? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Which of these, when used frequently, can cause long-term damage to vocal cords? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Unless the production is a musical, actors do not need to "warm up" before a show.


Question 10 of 10
10. Since schools are non-profit organizations, it is not necessary to pay royalties on plays and other materials.



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Most Recent Scores
May 31 2024 : PrairieRose78: 9/10
May 31 2024 : hilhanes: 9/10
May 21 2024 : PurpleComet: 7/10
Apr 29 2024 : Chavs: 9/10
Apr 28 2024 : Guest 187: 9/10
Apr 27 2024 : Guest 73: 2/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. A lot of first-time actors don't realize that they are hard to hear and see when they turn their backs to the audience. What is a "rule of thumb" to keep actors open to the audience?

Answer: Keep one foot pointed toward the audience at all times.

It's actually a "rule of foot". If you keep one foot pointed at the audience at all times, you are more likely to have at least *part* of the front of your body facing outwards. Keeping one hand pointed toward the wings could look awkward and obstruct air flow. Staying upstage keeps you away from the audience, and putting arrows on the floor would require actors to look down--a direction that would make them difficult to see and understand.
2. Many new actors have trouble memorizing their lines. What is a good way to memorize a script?

Answer: All of these are good techniques.

The thing that is most important is repetition. Depending on your learning style, you may want to see it, hear it, or do it. One of my professors in college taught me that memory is most malleable just before sleep and when you first wake. If you read a passage at those two times, you are more likely to remember it. I have memorized several scripts this way over the years, and to this day I can still perform them.
3. Some actors are hard to hear because they just aren't speaking loudly enough. Which of these is NOT a possible physical contributor to this problem?

Answer: Playing too small of a role

When working with children, mild "temper tantrums" can include not playing parts to their best abilities because they feel they deserved larger roles. Always keep understudies handy. This is behavior-related and not a physical problem you can overcome. Try to encourage the student first ("There are no small roles, only small actors.") Remember that "the show must go on". Replace the actor if you can't change the behavior.
4. If you want to feature an actor in the place the audience will look first (in the United States), where should you direct the actor to stand?

Answer: Downstage Right

Downstage right puts the actor on the front of the stage at the audience's left. Since Americans read left to right, they are inclined to look to the left first.
5. Directors need to tell students to go places like "upstage" and "downstage". Why were those directions named "up" and "down"?

Answer: Stages used to be built on a ramp

Stages used to be "raked" so that audiences (sitting on flat ground) could see all of the action. Today, most audiences are "raked". This way the stage is safer for the actors, and audiences can still see the stage.
6. Which of these steps is necessary before a young cast and crew rehearse on a stage?

Answer: Both of these are necessary

Everyone needs to learn safety--this is a given. It is also just as important that everyone learns the rules of courtesy. With young people, the fastest way to stop a rehearsal is a personality conflict. My number one rule is, "Keep your personal baggage outside." Conflicts from the school playground should not ever come into a rehearsal.
7. Many theatre people have superstitions about what you can and cannot do in a theatre. Which of these is NOT a common superstitious practice around a stage?

Answer: Someone must perform a cartwheel across the stage 5 minutes before curtain time.

Young students may not know these superstitions, but more experienced thespians pass them on quickly. Shakespeare's "MacBeth" is considered unlucky because of a string of theatre accidents that happened while producing the play (as if accidents don't happen during any other play...).
The whistling superstition started from practical practice--crew used whistles for scene changes, and an actor whistling could confuse them.
Pinching people for luck is an old superstition that carried into the theatre.
8. Which of these, when used frequently, can cause long-term damage to vocal cords?

Answer: Lemon

People frequently use lemon to clear the vocal cords of mucus. This is a very bad idea. Vocal cords have a normal coating on them. Lemon strips the cords of mucus and their natural coating. When you use your vocal cords while they are dry, you can cause nodes and other damage.
9. Unless the production is a musical, actors do not need to "warm up" before a show.

Answer: False

Any time you plan to use your voice for a long period of time (such as a two-hour play), you should use vocal exercises. Humming, tongue twisters, and breathing exercises are recommended.
10. Since schools are non-profit organizations, it is not necessary to pay royalties on plays and other materials.

Answer: False

Of course that's false! Playwrights depend on income as much as anyone else. Please get the proper permission before producing anyone's work.
Source: Author ferfer72

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