Quiz about Nice Bones in a Joint Like This
Quiz about Nice Bones in a Joint Like This

Nice Bones in a Joint Like This Quiz


In the human skeletal system, joints are where to go if you're looking for action where bones and their friends get together and dance, lift a glass, etc. So what's a nice bone like you doing in a joint like this?

A multiple-choice quiz by nannywoo. Estimated time: 4 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Science Trivia
  6. »
  7. Human Body
  8. »
  9. Skeletal System

Author
nannywoo
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
355,512
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
1346
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 75 (9/10), Guest 74 (2/10), Guest 149 (3/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. The joint in the human skeletal system that has the greatest range of motion can be found in the shoulder. What kind of joint is the shoulder? Hint

ball-and-socket joint
saddle joint
hinge joint
gin joint

2. The least complex type of joint allows one-directional movement in our elbows, our fingers and toes, and (in a modified form) in our knees. What is this simple type of joint called? Hint

ellipsoidal joint
ball-and-socket joint
hinge joint
phalanges joint

3. What type of unique, complex joint allows the thumb to cross over the palm of the hand, permitting a kind of movement that gives human hands great flexibility, allows us to grip an object, and makes fine coordination possible? Hint

mortise and tenon joint
hinge joint
saddle joint
ball-and-socket joint

4. Some joints are "fibrous joints" or "fixed joints" that allow very little movement. Where in the adult human body would we find around twenty fixed joints called "sutures"? Hint

toenails
thumb
skull
shoulder

5. The only bone in the human body that does not form a joint with any other bone is a small, "floating bone" that is shaped like a U. It helps us breathe, swallow, and move our tongues. What is the name of this bone? Hint

larynx
uvula
hyoid
funny bone

6. Strong fibers, considered part of the skeletal system, hold joints together, attaching bone to bone like elastic bands and preventing dislocation and uncontrolled movement of the joints. What are these fibers called? Hint

tendons
linguini
cartilage
ligaments

7. The upper end of the femur fits into the acetabulum of the pelvis to form an important joint in the human body called the acetabulofemoral joint. What type of joint is this, and where in the human body is it found? Hint

hinge joint / knee
ball-and-socket joint / hip
saddle joint / wrist
juke joint / hip hop

8. Sometimes called "the shock absorber of the body" what pearly white, slippery connective tissue at the epiphysis of a long bone in the human body provides a smooth surface that reduces friction so that the joint can move properly without being damaged? Hint

adipose tissue
dental enamel
epithelial tissue
hyaline cartilage

9. Fixed and semi-fixed joints do not need cushioning, because they either do not move or they move very little. Moveable joints, however, have cartilage and capsules of fluid that keep hard bone surfaces from rubbing together and causing damage. What do we call the fluid that protects moveable joints? Hint

cartilage fluid
cerebrospinal fluid
synovial fluid
brake fluid

10. The pivot joint between the atlas and axis bones (also called the atloaxoid joint) can also be called a "gliding joint" because it allows smooth movement from side to side, so that a certain part of the body can swivel and bend. What part of the body does this joint allow us to move? Hint

head
knee
shoulder
axolotl


(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The joint in the human skeletal system that has the greatest range of motion can be found in the shoulder. What kind of joint is the shoulder?

Answer: ball-and-socket joint

The ball-and-socket joint (sometimes called a "universal joint") allows us to swing our arms in circles and move them in all directions. The hip is also a ball-and-socket joint, although it does not move as freely as the shoulder. In a ball-and-socket joint, the rounded end of one bone fits smoothly into a matching indentation in another bone.
2. The least complex type of joint allows one-directional movement in our elbows, our fingers and toes, and (in a modified form) in our knees. What is this simple type of joint called?

Answer: hinge joint

Each of the hinge joints in the human body is more complex than a door hinge, but the same principle applies. With the help of muscles, tendons, and ligaments, hinge joints act as simple machines, like levers. Unlike a ball-and-socket joint, which can move in circles and in many directions, a hinge joint only moves back and forth in one direction. Ellipsoidal joints (also called condyloid joints) can move in two planes and are found in the wrists and ankles.

There are hinge joints in the phalanges (fingers and toes), but the word "phalanges" refers to the finger and toe bones, not a type of joint.
3. What type of unique, complex joint allows the thumb to cross over the palm of the hand, permitting a kind of movement that gives human hands great flexibility, allows us to grip an object, and makes fine coordination possible?

Answer: saddle joint

The human thumb is opposable and prehensile (grasping), and is capable of flexion (bending inwards); extension (bending or stretching outwards); abduction (moving away from the palm); adduction (moving towards the palm, touching the side); opposition (rotation to face the palm and touch the other fingers); and circumduction (complete rotation). Because these movements make so many human activities possible, the importance of the small saddle joint cannot be overemphasized.
4. Some joints are "fibrous joints" or "fixed joints" that allow very little movement. Where in the adult human body would we find around twenty fixed joints called "sutures"?

Answer: skull

A small bit of movement at the sutures of the adult skull (cranium) allows some "give" to better protect the separate flat bones of the head and keep them from shattering. At birth, these bones are not yet fused, a fact that can be confirmed if you gently touch the fontanelle (soft spot) on the top of an infant's head.

This greater flexibility allows the head of a baby to "mold" as it goes safely through the relatively narrow birth canal. Babies are born with around 300 bones (sources variously estimate as few as 270 and as many as 350) and a great deal of flexible cartilage, but by adulthood bones have knit together and hardened, and adult humans have only 206 bones.
5. The only bone in the human body that does not form a joint with any other bone is a small, "floating bone" that is shaped like a U. It helps us breathe, swallow, and move our tongues. What is the name of this bone?

Answer: hyoid

Seven pairs of strong muscles that act like pulleys moving in different directions--along with ligaments, tendons, and thyroid cartilage--keep the hyoid bone in place and connect it to the temporal bone (one of the sections of the skull), the mandible (the jawbone), and the larynx (voice box); muscles attached to the hyoid bone even reach down to the sternum (breastbone) and scapula (shoulder blade). So, while it is not directly attached to another bone at a joint, the hyoid bone functions as part of a complex of structures within the musculoskeletal system.
6. Strong fibers, considered part of the skeletal system, hold joints together, attaching bone to bone like elastic bands and preventing dislocation and uncontrolled movement of the joints. What are these fibers called?

Answer: ligaments

Ligaments limit joint movement and hold the bones together; they are strong fibers of connective tissue that attach bone to bone and form capsules around synovial joints. Tendons, also made of strong connective fibers, attach bones to muscles and act like pulleys, using the bone as support to move the muscle. A third kind of connective tissue, the fasciae, connects muscle to muscle. The direction and degree to which tendons and muscles function is partially determined by ligaments, which stabilize joints and work in tension with the other structures.
7. The upper end of the femur fits into the acetabulum of the pelvis to form an important joint in the human body called the acetabulofemoral joint. What type of joint is this, and where in the human body is it found?

Answer: ball-and-socket joint / hip

The hip joint (acetabulofemoral joint) is a ball-and-socket joint, with the ball-like protrusion at the top of the femur (long bone of the upper leg) fitting neatly into the cup-like socket of the acetabulum (part of the pelvis). The hip joint supports the weight of the body and helps us keep our balance and posture, whether we are walking, running, dancing, or standing still.
8. Sometimes called "the shock absorber of the body" what pearly white, slippery connective tissue at the epiphysis of a long bone in the human body provides a smooth surface that reduces friction so that the joint can move properly without being damaged?

Answer: hyaline cartilage

Hyaline cartilage, also called articular cartilage, covers the surface at the ends of long bones where they articulate: that is, where they form a joint that allows one bone to move in relation to another bone. The expanded end of a long bone is called its epiphysis. Cartilage is a type of connective tissue, while epithelial tissue is a different kind of tissue that covers the surfaces of the body, inside and out (skin, the lining of the gastrointestinal system, etc.). (The prefix "epi" in the words "epiphysis" and "epithelial" simply means "on, upon, at, by, near, over, on top of, toward, against, among"--the roots of the two words are unrelated.) Adipose tissue is a type of loose connective tissue that stores fat. Enamel covers the teeth, which are not bones, although they are considered part of the skeletal system.
9. Fixed and semi-fixed joints do not need cushioning, because they either do not move or they move very little. Moveable joints, however, have cartilage and capsules of fluid that keep hard bone surfaces from rubbing together and causing damage. What do we call the fluid that protects moveable joints?

Answer: synovial fluid

Synovial fluid functions with cartilage to cushion joints that move, which are appropriately termed synovial joints. Types of synovial joints include hinge joints, ball-and-socket joints, saddle joints, pivot joints, and others. Osteoarthritis occurs when synovial fluid loses its consistency with age, contributing to the breakdown of cartilage, which in turn causes bones to rub against each other and become damaged.

Some joints, such as the hip and the knee, can now be surgically replaced when they become damaged through injury or the wear and tear of age.
10. The pivot joint between the atlas and axis bones (also called the atloaxoid joint) can also be called a "gliding joint" because it allows smooth movement from side to side, so that a certain part of the body can swivel and bend. What part of the body does this joint allow us to move?

Answer: head

The atlas and axis are two tiny bones at the top of the spinal column, where it meets the bones of the skull. For the head to turn from side to side and to stretch up and down, a special sort of joint is needed. The atlas is the first cervical vertebra (C1) and is symbolically named for the Greek Titan Atlas, who held the globe of the earth on his shoulders.

The axis is the second cervical vertebra (C2), and its name comes from the Greek word for an axle that turns a wheel. The axis forms the pivot on which the ring-like atlas rotates. Amazingly intricate and elegant!
Source: Author nannywoo

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor CellarDoor before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Most Recent Scores
Jan 30 2023 : Guest 75: 9/10
Jan 30 2023 : Guest 74: 2/10
Jan 30 2023 : Guest 149: 3/10
Jan 29 2023 : Guest 71: 10/10
Jan 28 2023 : DDm5714: 7/10
Jan 26 2023 : CycleGrandma: 10/10
Jan 26 2023 : kasteel1: 8/10
Jan 26 2023 : HollyJCT: 10/10
Jan 19 2023 : Guest 173: 9/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series Scientific, Geographical, Historical:

Facts and fun from various categories, with lots of overlap.

  1. The 17th Century: I Remember It Well! Average
  2. The 17th Century: Meanwhile in Africa Easier
  3. The 1770s in Science Average
  4. A Short History of Forensic Science Easier
  5. Pass the Buckwheat for Breakfast Average
  6. Bikini Bottom Fauna Files Average
  7. Nice Bones in a Joint Like This Average
  8. I Need Some Help! Easier
  9. Creatures Great and Small Average
  10. Joy to the Whirled Easier
  11. I Left My Heart Where? Average
  12. N.C. Mountains to Sea Average

2/5/2023, Copyright 2023 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us