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Quiz about Are You a Roads Scholar
Quiz about Are You a Roads Scholar

Are You a Roads Scholar? Trivia Quiz


You don't need to have gone to the University of Oxford to be able to match these famous roads with their countries of origin. I've provided an extra fact about each road which may help you on your way.

A matching quiz by malik24. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
malik24
Time
4 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
399,668
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Very Easy
Avg Score
9 / 10
Plays
627
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 136 (10/10), DaMoopies (10/10), toddruby96 (10/10).
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. Abbey Road: A famous album photograph of the Beatles was taken here in 1969.  
  Australia
2. Trollstigen: Translated as 'Troll's Path' in the native tongue, one could drink in the 1,050-feet tall Stigfossen waterfalls from a viewing platform.   
  Norway
3. Orchard Road: This shoppers' paradise comprises over 800,000 square meters of retail establishments in an affluent, free-market friendly country.  
  Israel
4. Route 66: "It winds from Chicago to L.A., More than two thousand miles all the way"  
  United Kingdom
5. Eyre Highway: This 1030 mile-long road was named after Edward John Eyre, an explorer who crossed the Nullarbor Plain by land in 1840-1.   
  Iceland
6. Route 1: Also known as the Ring Road, this 828 mile road connects major inhabited areas like Bifröst and Skógar with one another.  
  Italy
7. North Yungas Road: This dangerous road linking the capital city with Coroico was nicknamed 'Death Road' and it took until 2006 for an alternative route to be built.  
  Singapore
8. La Rambla: Federico García Lorca once said of this tourist-friendly road that it was "the only street in the world which I wish would never end."  
  United States
9. Via Dolorosa: This was believed by many to be the route taken by Jesus to the site of his crucifixion.  
  Bolivia
10. Appian Way: This road connecting the capital city and Brindisi was named after the censor Appius Claudius Caecus.  
  Spain





Select each answer

1. Abbey Road: A famous album photograph of the Beatles was taken here in 1969.
2. Trollstigen: Translated as 'Troll's Path' in the native tongue, one could drink in the 1,050-feet tall Stigfossen waterfalls from a viewing platform.
3. Orchard Road: This shoppers' paradise comprises over 800,000 square meters of retail establishments in an affluent, free-market friendly country.
4. Route 66: "It winds from Chicago to L.A., More than two thousand miles all the way"
5. Eyre Highway: This 1030 mile-long road was named after Edward John Eyre, an explorer who crossed the Nullarbor Plain by land in 1840-1.
6. Route 1: Also known as the Ring Road, this 828 mile road connects major inhabited areas like Bifröst and Skógar with one another.
7. North Yungas Road: This dangerous road linking the capital city with Coroico was nicknamed 'Death Road' and it took until 2006 for an alternative route to be built.
8. La Rambla: Federico García Lorca once said of this tourist-friendly road that it was "the only street in the world which I wish would never end."
9. Via Dolorosa: This was believed by many to be the route taken by Jesus to the site of his crucifixion.
10. Appian Way: This road connecting the capital city and Brindisi was named after the censor Appius Claudius Caecus.

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May 21 2024 : Guest 136: 10/10
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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Abbey Road: A famous album photograph of the Beatles was taken here in 1969.

Answer: United Kingdom

'Abbey Road' was the Beatles' eleventh album and the four members were depicted as walking across a zebra crossing in the album's famous photograph. They were walking away from the EMI studios, which became known as the Abbey Road Studios in part because of the photo putting the road on the map. Before the Beatles came along, the road was best known for being close to Lord's cricket ground.

In 2010, the road was awarded a Grade II protected status for its 'cultural and historical importance'; people often visited the road to try and recreate the photo or parody it.
2. Trollstigen: Translated as 'Troll's Path' in the native tongue, one could drink in the 1,050-feet tall Stigfossen waterfalls from a viewing platform.

Answer: Norway

Trollstigen is a steep road northwest of Lillehammer in Norway. It has eleven hairpin turns and climbs to around 850m above sea level. Although this road is to be used by bicycles or motorised vehicles, a mountain path for pedestrians serves as an alternative way to experience the site's natural wonders.

The road has typically only been open for tourist use in summer and late autumn, although it can be closed whenever there is a significant amount of snow. Tourists may come from the majestic Geiranger fjords to see Trollstigen and Stigfossen, or they may perhaps go from Trollstigen to the Romsdalsfjord.
3. Orchard Road: This shoppers' paradise comprises over 800,000 square meters of retail establishments in an affluent, free-market friendly country.

Answer: Singapore

Although this 2.2km strip of road in southern Singapore has become best known for its shops, in the 19th century it was lined with nutmeg, pepper and fruit orchards that eventually declined due to disease. The Tangs department store, an early store which opened in 1958, was originally considered cursed due to its proximity to a Chinese graveyard.

In the evening, migrating birds can be seen from Orchard Road, though they have a messy side. According to Steven Goh, the executive director of the Orchard Road Business association who featured in the 'Man vs Birds' documentary: "We use 3,000 litres of high-pressured water to clean the streets each night and it's a lot of hard work to maintain Singapore's image of a clean and green country."
4. Route 66: "It winds from Chicago to L.A., More than two thousand miles all the way"

Answer: United States

The lyrics in the clue come from 'Route 66', which was a famous rhythm and blues standard composed in 1946 by Bobby Troup. The road originally ran from Chicago to Santa Monica and many sources claim it to have been 2448 miles long. The road was decertified in 1985.

Some sections of the road have been preserved as they were, whereas other parts have been made into other types of road. One of the first McDonald's restaurants was built on Route 66 by Dick and Mac McDonald in 1940, who rebuilt their restaurant in 1948 to serve foods like burgers and milkshakes in a quick, low-cost fashion.

This site can still be found as a McDonald's museum in San Bernadino.
5. Eyre Highway: This 1030 mile-long road was named after Edward John Eyre, an explorer who crossed the Nullarbor Plain by land in 1840-1.

Answer: Australia

The Eyre Highway connects South Australia and Western Australia and skirts the southern end of the famous Nullarbor Plain. The stretch of road between the Caiguna Roadhouse and Balladonia Roadhouse is known as the 90-mile straight and is the longest stretch of straight road in the country.

Other than some roadhouses and small settlements, the road is described as long and lonely with little visible agriculture, especially in the western section. This in and of itself can be a driver hazard, as well as wildlife like emus and kangaroos that can cross the road.
6. Route 1: Also known as the Ring Road, this 828 mile road connects major inhabited areas like Bifröst and Skógar with one another.

Answer: Iceland

The Ring Road is somewhat analogous to Highway 1 that the Eyre Highway sits on in Australia: it circles the edge regions of the country and connects most of the major towns and cities. For tourists, the Ring Road is a gateway to sights like the Reynisfjara Black Sand Beach, Skogafoss Waterfall and Northern Lights.

A proper trip driving around the Ring Road in its entirety could take at least a week, to give time to take in all the great sights on the way. Sections of the road can be shut off in winter, due to storms or other adverse conditions.
7. North Yungas Road: This dangerous road linking the capital city with Coroico was nicknamed 'Death Road' and it took until 2006 for an alternative route to be built.

Answer: Bolivia

The Interamerican Development Bank named the North Yungas Road as the world's most dangerous road in 1995. Approximately 300 people died every year before an alternative route between La Paz and Coroico was completed in 2006. Unlike the rest of the country, vehicles here drive on the left. Dangers on the road include: large seasonal differences in weather conditions; large rocks jutting out; narrow paths (approx 3m wide); absence of guard rails.

In spite - or perhaps because - of the dangers, biking tours on the road have become enticing for tourists.
8. La Rambla: Federico García Lorca once said of this tourist-friendly road that it was "the only street in the world which I wish would never end."

Answer: Spain

La Rambla was named after a seasonal stream deposit (raml in Arabic) and is to be found in Barcelona, Spain. It is 1.2km long and is a largely pedestrianised road known for its iconic plane trees which became the common tree planted from 1859. It is often known colloquially as 'Las Ramblas' as it is split into five sections: the Ramblas dels Estudis for example was the former location of a Jesuit University.

Some sights to be seen include the Gothic Quarter, Catalunya Square and the La Boqueria market. Spanish poet Federico García Lorca would visit the road when visiting Salvador Dali, a Catalan artist he greatly admired.
9. Via Dolorosa: This was believed by many to be the route taken by Jesus to the site of his crucifixion.

Answer: Israel

The Via Dolorosa was also known as the 'Sorrowful Way' or the 'Way of Grief'. Historically, it began near the Lion's Gate in Jerusalem where Jesus was tried and convicted, and ended at the hill of Golgotha where he was crucified. In today's terms, it runs between the Lion's Gate to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

It is made up of several streets and contains fourteen Stations of the Cross, with the last five being in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre itself.
10. Appian Way: This road connecting the capital city and Brindisi was named after the censor Appius Claudius Caecus.

Answer: Italy

Although the 'Queen of Roads' was built in 312 BC, large parts of it are still intact. It was built with large flat stones and was the first super highway in Europe. In 71 BC, 6,000 slaves were crucified on the Appian Way after a failed attempt at revolt.

The road was built for military purposes, but who could have predicted that it would play a role in World War II? The Germans used it to transport supplies in the Battle of Anzio, before the Allies took Rome and they were driven to escape north.
Source: Author malik24

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor stedman before going online.
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