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Quiz about Celtic Languages
Quiz about Celtic Languages

Celtic Languages Trivia Quiz


Celtic languages cover Welsh, Cornish, Manx, Gaelic (Scottish and Irish) and Breton. They are different from any other languages, but due to the diaspora of Celtic peoples, some words are recognisable to speakers of other tongues. Let's explore these.

A multiple-choice quiz by markswood. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
markswood
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
346,826
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
3685
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 192 (8/10), slay01 (10/10), brenda610 (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Grammatical structure in Celtic languages differs in many ways. For example there is no "having" of things. They are either "at you" or "with you".
The Irish Gaelic "Tá grá agam dhuit" means "I love you", but what is its literal translation?
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. If you were "old" in Cornwall, Wales or Brittany you would be "hen". In Gaelic you would be "sean", what do you think you would be on the Isle of Man? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Bara means bread in Welsh, Cornish and Breton, but what is the Gaelic word?
(Think of a fisherman's sweater.)
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. What are the two groupings that the six living Celtic languages are sorted into? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Cambrian, Cambric and Cymric have been used in reference to which of the Celtic Languages? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. What province in Argentina has Welsh-speaking natives? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Which Celtic Language is spoken within the French region formally known as Armorica? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Which day of the week do you think these all translate to; dy' Sul, disul, Dé Domhnaigh, Jedoonee, Didòmhnaich, dydd Sul? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Nos da, Oidhche mhath, Oie vie, Oíche mhaith, Nos dha and Noz vat all mean the same thing. Which phrase might you say at the end of the day? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. In which alphabet, also called the Celtic Tree Alphabet, were the earliest Old Irish writings? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Apr 09 2024 : Guest 192: 8/10
Mar 24 2024 : slay01: 10/10
Mar 21 2024 : brenda610: 7/10
Mar 20 2024 : DaltreyFan: 10/10
Feb 21 2024 : Guest 162: 5/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Grammatical structure in Celtic languages differs in many ways. For example there is no "having" of things. They are either "at you" or "with you". The Irish Gaelic "Tá grá agam dhuit" means "I love you", but what is its literal translation?

Answer: There is love at me to you

The same phrase in Cornish would be "My a'th kar".
Which leads on to a more clichéd approach, the chat-up line! I found a great Cornish language website which had some appropriate phrases for Valentine's Day, including the immortal line: "A wre'ta dos omma yn fenowgh?" or "Do you come here often?"
2. If you were "old" in Cornwall, Wales or Brittany you would be "hen". In Gaelic you would be "sean", what do you think you would be on the Isle of Man?

Answer: shenn

All the other answers mean "young" in Cornish, Gaelic and Welsh. I'm not sure the former James Bond would appreciate being called Old Connery.
3. Bara means bread in Welsh, Cornish and Breton, but what is the Gaelic word? (Think of a fisherman's sweater.)

Answer: Aran

Bara brith is either a Welsh fruit cake (no yeast) or a yeast bread with added fruit, the name means "speckled bread". The Manx for bread is "arran".
4. What are the two groupings that the six living Celtic languages are sorted into?

Answer: Brythonic and Goidelic

The six living Celtic languages are Welsh, Breton and Cornish, which fit the Brythonic grouping as well as Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Manx, which are the Goidelic grouped languages. Gaulish and Hispano-Celtic language groupings are all extinct in modern times.
5. Cambrian, Cambric and Cymric have been used in reference to which of the Celtic Languages?

Answer: Welsh

Cambria is the Latin version of the Welsh name for Wales, which is Cymru. Cymric is the Welsh name for the Welsh Language and Cambrian and Cambric are Latinised versions for the Welsh language. As of 2004 there were 750,000 native speakers of Welsh, the vast majority of them residing in Wales.
6. What province in Argentina has Welsh-speaking natives?

Answer: Chubut Province

Chubut province is located in southern Argentina, with only Santa Cruz province being more southerly. Rio Negro province is just north of Chubut and La Pampa just north of that. Gaiman, which is an area within Chubut province, is where the Welsh speaking Argentinians are concentrated in an area also know as "Y Wladfa".

The Welsh immigrants first came to Argentina around 1865 when Argentina wanted to build up other areas of the country outside of Buenos Aires. In July of 1865 153 Welsh immigrants arrived aboard the ship "Mimosa" in Chubut province.
7. Which Celtic Language is spoken within the French region formally known as Armorica?

Answer: Breton

The Armorica region includes what is now Brittany and therefore the home of the Bretons. These were Celtic Britons who migrated from Britain during the 5th to 7th centuries. The cartoon character Asterix the Gaul was from Armorica.
8. Which day of the week do you think these all translate to; dy' Sul, disul, Dé Domhnaigh, Jedoonee, Didòmhnaich, dydd Sul?

Answer: Sunday

Several of them are similar to the Latin "Solis" for sun and the Gaelic ones are similar to the Italian "Domenica" or Church Latin "Dominicus".
9. Nos da, Oidhche mhath, Oie vie, Oíche mhaith, Nos dha and Noz vat all mean the same thing. Which phrase might you say at the end of the day?

Answer: Good Night

The similarities are evident between the Welsh, Cornish and Breton phrases. The Gaelic and Manx phrases share similarities also. As the Gaelic Walton would say, "Oidhche mhath, John Boy".
10. In which alphabet, also called the Celtic Tree Alphabet, were the earliest Old Irish writings?

Answer: Ogham

From the 4th century and possibly even the 1st century, inscriptions were found using the Ogham alphabet. Most of these are in Ireland, but all the Celtic areas in the UK have examples of this alphabet.
Source: Author markswood

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor trident before going online.
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