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Quiz about A Quiz About POTs and PANs
Quiz about A Quiz About POTs and PANs

A Quiz About POTs and PANs


Even if not necessarily related to cooking or baking, all the words in this quiz contain either "pot" or "pan". How many of them do you know?
This is a renovated/adopted version of an old quiz by author Pat6789

A matching quiz by LadyNym. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
LadyNym
Time
3 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
1,456
Updated
Aug 01 23
# Qns
14
Difficulty
Very Easy
Avg Score
13 / 14
Plays
501
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 31 (0/14), Linda_Arizona (14/14), toddruby96 (12/14).
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. A set of kettledrums used in a symphony orchestra  
  potable
2. Exercising absolute power in an oppressive way  
  flippant
3. A dish of fruit cooked in water with sugar and spices  
  spangle
4. A small room or closet where food and kitchenware are stored  
  pandering
5. Favoritism towards relatives, especially in appointment to desirable positions  
  panoply
6. A smoked and dried chili pepper, widely used in Mexican cuisine  
  timpani
7. A small piece of shiny metal or plastic used as decoration  
  entrepot
8. Lacking respect or seriousness  
  pantry
9. A trading centre where goods are brought for import and export  
  compote
10. A bell tower, especially one that is not physically attached to a church  
  campanile
11. Providing gratification for other people's desires, or exploiting their weaknesses  
  chipotle
12. An area of intense activity  
  despotic
13. A large and impressive array  
  hotspot
14. Being fit to drink  
  nepotism





Select each answer

1. A set of kettledrums used in a symphony orchestra
2. Exercising absolute power in an oppressive way
3. A dish of fruit cooked in water with sugar and spices
4. A small room or closet where food and kitchenware are stored
5. Favoritism towards relatives, especially in appointment to desirable positions
6. A smoked and dried chili pepper, widely used in Mexican cuisine
7. A small piece of shiny metal or plastic used as decoration
8. Lacking respect or seriousness
9. A trading centre where goods are brought for import and export
10. A bell tower, especially one that is not physically attached to a church
11. Providing gratification for other people's desires, or exploiting their weaknesses
12. An area of intense activity
13. A large and impressive array
14. Being fit to drink

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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. A set of kettledrums used in a symphony orchestra

Answer: timpani

Timpani (or, less commonly, tympani) are a set of two or more kettledrums - large, bowl-shaped drums with an adjustable membrane - found in the percussion section of a symphony orchestra, and played with special drumsticks called timpani mallets. Derived from military drums, timpani are also used in marching bands and concert bands, and occasionally even in rock music.

First attested in English in the 1850s, the word timpani is the plural of Italian "timpano" (kettledrum), derived from from Latin "tympanum", which in turn comes from Greek "tympanon", (hand drum). The English word tympanum (which has the same etymology) denotes either the eardrum, or the triangular, recessed upper part of the front of a building, as seen in Greek and Roman temples.
2. Exercising absolute power in an oppressive way

Answer: despotic

Despotic is the adjective from the noun despot, which is often used as a synonym of tyrant or dictator. These words are not necessarily always employed in a political context, but can also refer to anyone who wields authority ruthlessly and oppressively: for instance, a sports coach or the headteacher of a school can be called despotic if they do not listen to others and demand absolute obedience.

The origin of the word despot, however, is much less sinister, as the Ancient Greek "despótes" simply meant lord; its feminine form, "despoina", was often used as an epithet for various goddesses, in particular Persephone. In the Byzantine Empire, "despotes" was the title bestowed on the sons or sons-in-law of a ruling emperor. The above-mentioned words tyrant and dictator have also undergone a similar semantic shift in modern times, as neither of them originally had the negative connotation they have today. Despot was first used in English in the late 16th century, and despotic in the early 17th century; the noun despotism is an 18th-century coinage.
3. A dish of fruit cooked in water with sugar and spices

Answer: compote

First used in English in the late 17th century, compote is a rather fancy word for a dish that can be as homely as stewed prunes, or involve more exotic fruits, spices and flavourings. In US English, the word can also denote the container in which this dish is served - usually a bowl of glass, porcelain or metal with a base and stem.

As a compote is something nice to eat, you may find it surprising to know that it has the same etymology as something much less appetizing - compost. Both words come from Old French "composte", which is in turn derived from Latin "composita", the feminine form of the past participle of the verb "componere" (put together). Indeed, both words refer to a mixture of things.
4. A small room or closet where food and kitchenware are stored

Answer: pantry

A word frequently employed in food marketing for its homey connotation, pantry may refer to a storeroom where food (and often the utensils used for cooking - such as pots and pans) are kept, or a smaller space such a closet or cupboard - which is more common in modern homes. In US English, pantry can also refer to a place where groceries are given out to people in need.

Though associated with food and its preparation, pantry is not related to "pan", but to "panis", the Latin word for bread, through Medieval Latin "panataria" and Old French "paneterie" (bread room). In modern Italian and Spanish, the words "panetteria" and "panadería" mean bakery.
5. Favoritism towards relatives, especially in appointment to desirable positions

Answer: nepotism

First used in the 1670s, nepotism comes from Latin "nepos" (grandson or nephew) through Italian "nepotismo" and French "népotisme". Originally used in reference to the favoritism shown by medieval and Renaissance popes and cardinals towards members of their family. At that time, it was far from uncommon for high prelates of the Catholic Church to have illegitimate children, and the word "nephew" sometimes referred to natural sons. A well-known example of nepotism was the notorious Borgia family, whose first pope, Callixtus III, in 1456 appointed two of his nephews as cardinals - one of whom, Rodrigo, would become Pope Alexander VI.

While, strictly speaking, nepotism applies to favoritism towards family members, the word is often employed in reference to favours granted by people in positions of power to close friends as well as relatives.
6. A smoked and dried chili pepper, widely used in Mexican cuisine

Answer: chipotle

Chipotles are fully ripened jalapeño peppers that have been smoke-dried, turning a dark, reddish-brown colour. As chili peppers go, chipotles are not excessively hot, but possess a complex, smoky flavour that makes them popular ingredients in sauces, marinades, and slow-cooked dishes. They are mostly produced in Mexico, and widely employed in the cuisine of that country, as well as in the cuisines of the Southwestern US. Chipotle is also the name of a US chain of fast-casual Mexican restaurants.

Like other words for foods from Mexico (such as chocolate or avocado), chipotle comes from Nahuatl, the language spoken by the Aztecs, through Spanish. In Nahuatl, "chilpoctli" simply means smoked chili - from "chilli" (chili pepper) and "poctli" (smoke). The word was first attested in English in the 1920s.
7. A small piece of shiny metal or plastic used as decoration

Answer: spangle

Usually shaped like very thin discs or squares, spangles (also known as sequins) are sewn on clothing or fashion accessories, sometimes in elaborate patterns. They are also widely employed in various kinds of crafts, such as papercrafts, embroidery, and jewelry making. As a verb, to spangle means to sprinkle or cover with spangles or similar small, glittering objects - as in the title of the US national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner".

First used in English in the 15th century, spangle is a word of Germanic origin - a diminutive of Middle English "spang" (shiny ornament), probably derived from Middle Dutch "spange" (brooch or clasp). The latter word is related to span, as they both come from a Germanic root meaning to stretch.
8. Lacking respect or seriousness

Answer: flippant

Flippant is an adjective with a slightly negative connotation, synonymous with terms such as cheeky or irreverent. Somebody who is flippant or makes a flippant remark does not take something as seriously as they should, thus showing disrespect. However, when the word first entered the English lexicon in the late 16th century, it was used in a more positive sense - denoting talkativeness rather than impertinence.

Flippant comes from the verb to flip, which is believed to be onomatopoeic in origin - imitating the sound of something being flipped (like a pancake). The ending -ant (which, etymologically, is a Latin present participle suffix) may have been modeled on adjectives such as petulant or ignorant.
9. A trading centre where goods are brought for import and export

Answer: entrepot

First attested in English in the mid-18th century, the word entrepôt denotes a centre for the storage and distribution of goods. This term is often used in reference to cities that are not only hubs of trade, but also noted for their multicultural milieu - such as the Asian cities of Dubai, Hong Kong, and Singapore, all among the world's major transshipment centres.

As its spelling indicates, entrepôt is a loanword from French, which literally means something placed between. Its root is Latin "interpositum", the past participle of the verb "interponere" (to place between). In modern French, the word is generally used to mean warehouse or storage facility
10. A bell tower, especially one that is not physically attached to a church

Answer: campanile

Campanile is a loanword from Italian, first attested in English in the early 17th century. It comes from "campana", which means bell. Campana is a word of Late Latin origin, which was coined when large church bells were introduced with the advent of Christianity. It is the feminine form of the adjective "campanus", meaning "from Campania" - the region of southern Italy where Naples and Pompeii are located - as bronze church bells are believed to have been first cast in that region.

Compared with other bell towers, a campanile has the distinction of being freestanding, and often located at some distance from the church building. Famous examples of campaniles (or campanili, if you prefer to use the Italian form of the plural) are Giotto's Campanile in Florence, St Mark's Campanile in Venice, and the iconic Leaning Tower of Pisa.
11. Providing gratification for other people's desires, or exploiting their weaknesses

Answer: pandering

Pandering is the gerund of the verb to pander, which can be used as either a noun or an adjective. The verb is in turn derived from the name of a literary character, the Trojan Pandarus, who in works by Giovanni Boccaccio, Geoffrey Chaucer and William Shakespeare acts as a go-between in the relationship between Criseyde (or Cressida) and Troilus. Because of his depiction as an aging degenerate in Shakespeare's play "Troilus and Cressida", the nouns pander and panderer have become synonymous with bawd or pimp.

In modern English, however, pander and pandering are more often used in the figurative meaning of catering to other people's desires (not necessarily sexual ones), or exploiting their weaknesses - generally to obtain some advantage for yourself. Some politicians or otherwise influential figures are in the habit of pandering to people's prejudices and baser emotions to further their own agenda.
12. An area of intense activity

Answer: hotspot

Hotspot (also written as two separate words) can have different meanings, depending on the context where it is used. In its most literal meaning, it refers to an area of intense heat or radiation, such as one where volcanic activity occurs regularly. When used figuratively, it can have a negative connotation - as when describing an area of marked political unrest - or a positive one - generally referring to places that offer plenty of opportunities for business, entertainment, or socialization. Another, very recent meaning of the word denotes a place that offers wireless access to the Internet.

One of English's myriad compound words, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary the first known use of hotspot - in the meaning of unstable or dangerous area - dates from the 1880s, while other meanings were introduced in the 1920s-1950s.
13. A large and impressive array

Answer: panoply

Panoply is one of the many words that contain the Greek prefix "pan-" (all). In Ancient Greek, "panoplia" had the very specific meaning of full suit of armour - referring to the full complement of armour and weapons worn by hoplites, heavily armed foot soldiers. The word's earliest uses in English, dating from the late 16th century, refer to this literal meaning. In some translations of the Bible, the "full armour of God" in Ephesians 6:11 is rendered as the panoply of God.

In modern English usage - dating from the late 1820s - this rather high-register term is usually employed to denote a wide range or array of things that is likely to cause amazement or admiration. The use of panoply is also often characterized by a somewhat ironic undertone, as if emphasizing the pretentious nature of certain displays.
14. Being fit to drink

Answer: potable

Potable can be used either as a noun or as an adjective. In the latter case, it functions as a more formal synonym of drinkable, and is generally used in reference to water that is clean and safe to drink. As a noun, it often appears in the plural to denote alcoholic beverages rather than any liquid suitable for drinking.

First used in English in the 15th century, potable comes from the Latin verb "potare" (drink) through the adjective "potabilis". Other relatively common words related to "potare" are potion (a mixture of liquids meant to be drunk) and symposium (originally a drinking party).
Source: Author LadyNym

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