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Quiz about And the Oscar Goes to 1935
Quiz about And the Oscar Goes to 1935

And the Oscar Goes to... (1935) Quiz


The 7th Academy Awards took place on February 27th, 1935, honoring the best films from January 1st to December 31st, 1934.

A multiple-choice quiz by reedy. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
reedy
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
335,563
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
11 / 15
Plays
575
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 15
1. The host for the 7th Academy Awards ceremony was primarily a novelist and dramatist, although he did write for the screen, as well as act. Coincidentally, his novelized story collection "Old Judge Priest" (1915) was adapted in 1934 as "Judge Priest" with the previous year's Oscar host, Will Rogers, in the starring role. Who was the host? Hint


Question 2 of 15
2. With the announcement of the Oscar nominees, an uproar occurred over the exclusion of a certain actress from the list of nominees for Best Actress. Who did the public feel should have been nominated for her role in "Of Human Bondage"? Hint


Question 3 of 15
3. Uproars over nomination lists aside, a Best Actress winner still needed to be selected. Who took home the Oscar for her portrayal of Ellen "Ellie" Andrews? Hint


Question 4 of 15
4. In his career, this year's Best Actor Winner starred with Joan Crawford eight times, Myrna Loy seven times, and Jean Harlow six times. Who was he? Hint


Question 5 of 15
5. A new category presented at the 7th Academy Awards was that of Best Song. With music by Con Conrad and lyrics by Herb Magidson, what film was "The Continental" from? Hint


Question 6 of 15
6. A second musical category was introduced this year; Best Score. The Columbia Studio Music Department won for what romantic film? Hint


Question 7 of 15
7. The accolades for Best Story went to Arthur Caesar for a crime story starring Clark Gable, William Powell and Myrna Loy. What was the name of the winning picture? Hint


Question 8 of 15
8. What film, based on the 1933 short story "Night Bus" by Samuel Hopkins Adams, won the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay? Hint


Question 9 of 15
9. Best Film Editing also made its debut as a category this year. The winning movie's secondary title was "Mala the Magnificent". What film (and editor) took home the Oscar? Hint


Question 10 of 15
10. The winning film for Best Art Direction was released in a French-language version in France in addition to the English release in the United States. What was the English title for "La Veuve Joyeuse"? Hint


Question 11 of 15
11. Victor Milner accepted the Oscar for Best Cinematography for his work on an epic starring Claudette Colbert in the title role. And the Oscar went to... which film? Hint


Question 12 of 15
12. A special Academy Juvenile Award was given to a very young lady "in grateful recognition of her outstanding contribution to screen entertainment during the year 1934". What was the name of this six-year-old?

Answer: (First and last name or last name only)
Question 13 of 15
13. This year's Best Assistant Director Oscar went to John S. Waters for his work on a film adapted from a biography. It went on to be the highest-grossing film of 1934. What was it called? Hint


Question 14 of 15
14. The Oscar for Best Director went to an Italian-born man who majored in chemical engineering at university. Who won his first of three career Oscars in this category? Hint


Question 15 of 15
15. "It Happened One Night", the winning picture for Best Picture, set an Oscar record that was only repeated twice in the 20th century. What was it? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The host for the 7th Academy Awards ceremony was primarily a novelist and dramatist, although he did write for the screen, as well as act. Coincidentally, his novelized story collection "Old Judge Priest" (1915) was adapted in 1934 as "Judge Priest" with the previous year's Oscar host, Will Rogers, in the starring role. Who was the host?

Answer: Irvin S. Cobb

The 1935 edition of the Oscars occurred at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles, California. Irvin S. Cobb (1876-1944) hosted, and while he was known primarily as a novelist and columnist, he was also involved in the world of film. In addition to some of his works being adapted for the screen, Cobb also wrote screenplays; in all he had 18 writing credits.

As an actor, he appeared in 19 different films, shorts and documentaries.
2. With the announcement of the Oscar nominees, an uproar occurred over the exclusion of a certain actress from the list of nominees for Best Actress. Who did the public feel should have been nominated for her role in "Of Human Bondage"?

Answer: Bette Davis

On January 16th, the Academy announced that voters could disregard the printed ballot, and put down any name that they wished. It was the first time that there had been any such response to the announced nomination list. There was also a movement in support of Myrna Loy for her role in "The Thin Man", but the driving force for the reaction was support for Bette Davis. In the end, Davis' name was the only one included of the two as an official nominee.

Bette Davis (1908-1989) received critically acclaim for her role as the shrewish Mildred Rogers in the adaptation of W. Somerset Maugham 1915 novel of the same name. When her name did not appear on the ballot, "The Hollywood Citizen News" noted it, and even fellow nominee Norma Shearer joined the campaign to have her nominated.

Following these events, the Academy changed the voting rules for the Oscars to expand to all eligible members of a given branch of the Academy, and not to just a small committee.
3. Uproars over nomination lists aside, a Best Actress winner still needed to be selected. Who took home the Oscar for her portrayal of Ellen "Ellie" Andrews?

Answer: Claudette Colbert

Claudette Colbert (1903-1996) was born in France, but raised in New York. Her professional career began on Broadway in the 1920s, and she appeared in her first film in 1927; a box office flop entitled "For the Love of Mike", now considered a lost film. By 1934's "It Happened One Night", for which she received her Oscar, she had acted in 23 films. She continued acting until 1961 with her last film, "Parrish".

As Ellen "Ellie" Andrews in "It Happened One Night", Colbert played a pampered socialite trying to reunite with the man she married against her father's will. In so doing, she meets and falls in love with reporter Peter Warne (Clark Gable). This was her first of three nominations for Best Actress in her career, but her only win.
4. In his career, this year's Best Actor Winner starred with Joan Crawford eight times, Myrna Loy seven times, and Jean Harlow six times. Who was he?

Answer: Clark Gable

William Clark Gable (1901-1960) entered the world of film after getting some help from a coach. After receiving some inheritance money at the age of 21, Gable worked with acting coach Josephine Dillon, who eventually became his first wife. She helped him with his speech and posture, as well as his presentation (fixed teeth and hairstyle) and they moved to Hollywood in 1924 to try to get his acting career off the ground. After some bit parts and roles as an extra, Gable returned to stage work.

It was after a production of John Wexley's "The Last Mile" that Gable was offered a contract with MGM, and his career took off.

Gable received the Oscar for Best Actor for playing reporter Peter Warne in "It Happened One Night" opposite Best Actress winner Claudette Colbert. In all, Gable had two other Oscar nominations in his career, but only this one win.
5. A new category presented at the 7th Academy Awards was that of Best Song. With music by Con Conrad and lyrics by Herb Magidson, what film was "The Continental" from?

Answer: The Gay Divorcee

"The Gay Divorcee" was the second musical movie pairing Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, the first being 1933's "Flying Down to Rio". In all, they performed together in 10 films.

Ginger Rogers' character is seeking a divorce, and makes arrangements through a lawyer to go to a hotel and be 'caught' in an adulterous affair. She meets Fred Astaire's character and mistakes him for the man arranged for her to be 'caught' with.

The Oscar-winning song "The Continental" provided the musical backdrop for a 22-minute dance sequence near the end of the film.
6. A second musical category was introduced this year; Best Score. The Columbia Studio Music Department won for what romantic film?

Answer: One Night of Love

"One Night of Love" is set in a world of music as Best Actress nominee Grace Moore plays operatic hopeful Mary Barrett. Despite losing a contest to be chosen to study under the great opera maestro Guilio Monterverdi, Barrett decides to move to Milan to pursue her career.

There, Monterverdi happens to hear her sing, and begins to work with her after all. Their long hours of working together develops into a love affair, but it doesn't come easy when Monterverdi's ex-lover tries to get in the way.
7. The accolades for Best Story went to Arthur Caesar for a crime story starring Clark Gable, William Powell and Myrna Loy. What was the name of the winning picture?

Answer: Manhattan Melodrama

"Manhattan Melodrama" is a story of two childhood friends, both orphaned in an accident, who grow up following very different paths - one into law enforcement and the other into a life of crime. Despite their choices, they maintain their friendship, even up to the moment that Jim (the District Attorney) has to prosecute Blackie for murder. Myrna Loy plays the love interest first of Blackie, then of Jim.

Arthur Caesar (1892-1953) is credited with writing for 42 films between 1924 and 1951, however he is most well-known for writing "Manhattan Melodrama" if for no other reason than that it was the last film that John Dillinger saw before being gunned down outside a Chicago theater.
8. What film, based on the 1933 short story "Night Bus" by Samuel Hopkins Adams, won the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay?

Answer: It Happened One Night

Robert Riskin (1897-1955) accepted the Oscar for his work adapting the story into film. In his career, he was known primarily for his collaborations with Frank Capra, including "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town" (1936) and "Lost Horizon" (1937).

Samuel Hopkins Adams (1871-1958) was a prolific writer, who began as an investigative journalist. His first fiction novel was a collaboration with Stewart Edwart White entitled "The Mystery" (1907). He continued to write right up until his death in 1958.

"Night Bus" was originally published as a magazine short story in the August 1933 issue of "Cosmopolitan". The love story actually takes place over several nights in the movie, in spite of the implication of the title.
9. Best Film Editing also made its debut as a category this year. The winning movie's secondary title was "Mala the Magnificent". What film (and editor) took home the Oscar?

Answer: "Eskimo" (Conrad A. Nervig)

"Eskimo" is actually considered a 1933 film, but it was not released in theaters until January 10th, 1934. Filmed in Alaska, "Eskimo" tells the tale of Mala, an Inupiat man whose life is disastrously changed when his life intersects with an unscrupulous white trader. This was the first film that was made entirely in a native language, and it launched the career of Inupiat actor Ray Mala, who has the distinction of being the first non-white actor to get a leading role. "Eskimo" was billed as "The biggest picture ever made."

Conrad A. Nervig (1889-1980) received two other nominations for film editing in his career, with one other win (1950's "King Solomon's Mines"). He retired in 1954 after 81 editing credits in his career.
10. The winning film for Best Art Direction was released in a French-language version in France in addition to the English release in the United States. What was the English title for "La Veuve Joyeuse"?

Answer: The Merry Widow

Cedric Gibbons (1893-1960) and Fredric Hope (1900-1937) took home the Oscar for their work on "The Merry Widow."

Based on the operetta of the same name by Franz Lehár (1870-1948), "The Merry Widow" has Maurice Chevalier in the role of Count Danilo, who has been ordered by King Achmet of Marshovia (George Barbier) to court and marry Jeanette MacDonald's character Madame Sonia, a rich widow with a lot of land.

The French version, "La Veuve Joyeuse", made some changes for political considerations. King Achmed and Queen Dolores were demoted to a General and his wife was the biggest difference, with all political humor and references to royalty removed.
11. Victor Milner accepted the Oscar for Best Cinematography for his work on an epic starring Claudette Colbert in the title role. And the Oscar went to... which film?

Answer: Cleopatra

"Cleopatra" tells the tale of the famed Egyptian queen and her relationship to Julius Caesar (Warren William) and Marc Antony (Henry Wilcoxon). Other major roles are by Joseph Schildkraut in the role of King Herod, and Ian Keith, who plays Octavian. "Cleopatra" was also nominated for Best Picture, Best Assistant Director (Cullen Tate), Best Film Editing (Anne Bauchens) and Best Sound, Recording (Franklin Hansen).

Victor Milner (1893-1972) worked on more than 130 films in his career, and he received ten Oscar nominations as well. "Cleopatra" was his only win.
12. A special Academy Juvenile Award was given to a very young lady "in grateful recognition of her outstanding contribution to screen entertainment during the year 1934". What was the name of this six-year-old?

Answer: Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple was born in 1928, and began her film career at the age of three. In 1934, the year for which she received the Oscar, she appeared in 11 films including "Bright Eyes", which launched her to superstardom. The Academy Juvenile Award was her only Oscar win.

She retired from filmmaking in the late 1940s, but did continue with television into the 1960s. Afterwards, she unsuccessfully ran for Congress in 1967, but was later appointed as Ambassador to Ghana (1974) and Czechoslovakia (1989).
13. This year's Best Assistant Director Oscar went to John S. Waters for his work on a film adapted from a biography. It went on to be the highest-grossing film of 1934. What was it called?

Answer: Viva Villa!

The movie stars Wallace Beery as Pancho Villa, in a fictionalized biography of the Mexican Revolutionary general. In this story, a young Villa is transformed from an avenging bandit to revolutionary after meeting with visionary Francisco Madero.

John S. Waters (1893-1965) was also nominated (but didn't win) the previous year, and was the only one of that 18 to receive a second nomination.
14. The Oscar for Best Director went to an Italian-born man who majored in chemical engineering at university. Who won his first of three career Oscars in this category?

Answer: Frank Capra

After missing out on the Oscar the previous year for "Lady for a Day" (1933), Capra took home the honors for "It Happened One Night". In the years to come, Capra would make his mark on the Academy with four more Best Director nominations, with two more wins. Not only did Capra strike gold as a feature-film director, he also would receive two nominations for documentaries, taking home an additional Oscar in that category for "Prelude to War" (1943).

Capra (1897-1991) would have a prolific career as a filmmaker, directing 54 movies and documentaries, as well as producing 42 and writing 41 (with many crossovers).
15. "It Happened One Night", the winning picture for Best Picture, set an Oscar record that was only repeated twice in the 20th century. What was it?

Answer: Swept the top five awards

The feat was repeated by 1975's "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" and 1991's "The Silence of the Lambs."

"It Happened One Night" is based on the story "Night Bus" by Samuel Hopkins Adams. Ellen "Ellie" Andrews marries fortune-hunter "King Westley" against her father's wishes. Her father 'rescues' her from the situation before the marriage can be consummated. Ellie runs away again and takes a bus to New York City where she meets reporter Peter Warne. Through their adventure, they fall in love with each other.

The film was remade into a movie musical on two separate occasions: "Eve Knew Her Apples" (1945) and "You Can't Run Away From It" (1956).
Source: Author reedy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor skunkee before going online.
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