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Quiz about Ralph Meets the Family
Quiz about Ralph Meets the Family

Ralph Meets the Family Trivia Quiz


Ralph the llama wants to learn more about his family (the camelid family). Join him as he visits different members of his family and hopefully picks up some even-toed ungulate related information along the way. :)

A multiple-choice quiz by doublemm. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
doublemm
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
318,329
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
471
Last 3 plays: Linda_Arizona (7/10), gracious1 (7/10), Guest 72 (4/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. As mentioned in the introduction, camelids are even-toed ungulates. Ralph the llama deduces from this that all members of his family have an even number of toes, but the rest is lost on him. He visits great uncle Deputygary to elaborate on this term. Great uncle Deputygary tells Ralph that even-toed ungulates make up the order Artiodactyla and he begins to list several members of this order. Which of these relatives is Deputygary unlikely to mention? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Feeling that great uncle Deputygary is going off on a tangent, naming countless distant relatives, Ralph the llama now saunters along to cousin Jabberwok's. She has promised him a good meal, but Ralph is not entirely sure what he is going to be given - a large pancake? Or maybe spaghetti bolognaise? If she wants to serve proper llama food, what is cousin Jabberwok most likely to serve to young Ralph upon his arrival? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Nice and full from his meal, Ralph the llama now begins to wonder more about his immediate family. With this in mind, you accompany him to visit his father, Glendathecat. Ralph's dad tells him many stories about their family - some are well behaved and keep themselves to themselves, but some are a bit wild. Which of these camelids is regarded as wild, rather than domesticated? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Due to a broken leg, Glendathecat tells Ralph that he is unable to visit cousin Baban in Peru and so offers Ralph the ticket. You and Ralph are supposed to be meeting cousin Baban at Lima International, but have never met her before. Cousin Baban is an alpaca, so what should you be looking for? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Cousin Baban tells you and Ralph more about the camelid family during your visit to Peru. She tells you about great aunt Exit10 and how she has the hump. However, cousin Baban does not mean Exit10 is grumpy, but that she is a dromedary and so possesses ONE hump. Which type of camel typically possesses TWO humps?

Answer: (Begins with a "B")
Question 6 of 10
6. Ralph the llama takes you to his next relative, uncle MIMO. Having done much research into the "family tree," MIMO begins to tell you that the camelid family originated from the North American continent. Is there still a wild population of camelids on the continent today?


Question 7 of 10
7. MIMO tells you and Ralph the llama about a bone which was found at a Wal-Mart construction site in 2007. What was significant about this discovery? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. As mentioned earlier in the quiz, many camelids have been domesticated and so can perform specific jobs. Cousin Kyle tells you about how llamas can be used for a special purpose in North Carolina, just off of the Blue Ridge Mountains. What is this special job? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Still a bit curious about those "wild" members of the camelid family Glendathecat mentioned earlier, you and Ralph decide to go and meet Ralph's wacky aunts, Flopsy and PDAZ, the guanacos. In which South American country are you unlikely to find Flopsy and PDAZ causing mischief? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Your final visit is to Ralph's Grandparents, Mikejamillon and Qoolgal. They tell Ralph that when he and his cousins (the alpaca, vicuna and guanaco) were younger, they had a special nickname for them - the same nickname many others give to these animals. What was this nickname? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
May 09 2024 : Linda_Arizona: 7/10
Apr 14 2024 : gracious1: 7/10
Apr 04 2024 : Guest 72: 4/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. As mentioned in the introduction, camelids are even-toed ungulates. Ralph the llama deduces from this that all members of his family have an even number of toes, but the rest is lost on him. He visits great uncle Deputygary to elaborate on this term. Great uncle Deputygary tells Ralph that even-toed ungulates make up the order Artiodactyla and he begins to list several members of this order. Which of these relatives is Deputygary unlikely to mention?

Answer: Rhinoceroses

There are three ways you may have arrived at this answer:
1) You really know your stuff and are able to list the different orders of different animals.
2) You think back to pictures of these animals you may have seen and think whether or not they have an odd or even number of toes.
3) The good old blind guess.

Whereas sheep, giraffes and hippos all have an even number of toes (and therefore belong to the same order as the camelids - Artiodactyla), the rhino has an odd number of toes, with three, and so belongs to the order Perissodactyla.

Those in the camelid family, great uncle Deputygary informs you, have two toes on each foot, which also features a tough pad which both carries the weight of the camelid and can provide traction when climbing.
2. Feeling that great uncle Deputygary is going off on a tangent, naming countless distant relatives, Ralph the llama now saunters along to cousin Jabberwok's. She has promised him a good meal, but Ralph is not entirely sure what he is going to be given - a large pancake? Or maybe spaghetti bolognaise? If she wants to serve proper llama food, what is cousin Jabberwok most likely to serve to young Ralph upon his arrival?

Answer: A mixed leafy salad

The staple food of camelids is grass, although many other things can be eaten, e.g. fungi, shrubs, and grains.

Some camelids, such as the Bactrian, have adaptations for browsing.

A large reason for the variety in diet is that many members of the camelid family have been domesticated - being fed by human beings and so have a more varied diet than they would in the wild. Camelids have a specially adapted top lip, which is split into two, each side able to move and pull long grasses into their mouths. The food they eat is digested in a three-chambered digestive tract.
3. Nice and full from his meal, Ralph the llama now begins to wonder more about his immediate family. With this in mind, you accompany him to visit his father, Glendathecat. Ralph's dad tells him many stories about their family - some are well behaved and keep themselves to themselves, but some are a bit wild. Which of these camelids is regarded as wild, rather than domesticated?

Answer: The vicuņa

Thanks to conservation measures, the vicuņa's population is increasing.

Declared as endangered in 1974, the population grew from 6,000 to between 100,000 and 200,000 (as the figure stands today). A probable reason for their endangerment was their being hunted for the fine, soft wool they produce. One of the conservation measures is actually to round up as many vicuņas as possible and to shear those with particularly long wool, so as to prevent poaching. The extent of the hunting is not only seen in the low number of this species, but in their shyness.

The vicuņa can be found on the Andean plateau of South America at altitudes exceeding 4,000 m. It is the smallest member of the camelid family, standing only 1 m at shoulder length. They are timid looking creatures, with a slightly shorter face than many other camelids, terrific sight, good hearing, but a poor sense of smell.
4. Due to a broken leg, Glendathecat tells Ralph that he is unable to visit cousin Baban in Peru and so offers Ralph the ticket. You and Ralph are supposed to be meeting cousin Baban at Lima International, but have never met her before. Cousin Baban is an alpaca, so what should you be looking for?

Answer: Something like a llama, but smaller, woollier, and with straight ears

The main attraction of the alpacas is their fleece. Unlike the vicuņa, the fleece of the alpaca grows rapidly and can easily reach the ground if not shaven. The wool also grows rapidly on the face and legs of the alpaca, giving it an appearance slightly reminiscent of a poodle. Indeed, the fact that the alpaca wool grows so rapidly and that they are easy to farm means that their wool is used to make a number of things, including sheets, scarves, hats, and jumpers.

The alpaca is similar in character to its domesticated cousins (e.g. the llama and the camel). They are pleasant companions and live in social groups. The character of an alpaca varies from one to another and this is seen in their habits - the types of sounds they produce and whether they spit or not. The spit of an alpaca is only usually directed at other alpacas and only some display this habit. Alpacas are capable of making a range of sounds for different situations, e.g. when the herd is under attack or when males challenge one another for alpha male status over the herd.
5. Cousin Baban tells you and Ralph more about the camelid family during your visit to Peru. She tells you about great aunt Exit10 and how she has the hump. However, cousin Baban does not mean Exit10 is grumpy, but that she is a dromedary and so possesses ONE hump. Which type of camel typically possesses TWO humps?

Answer: Bactrian

The dromedary (or Arabian) is the larger of the two, but the bactrian is stalkier and has a thicker coat.

Both have been largely domesticated and few wild camels remain. Examples of wild camels are the 900 or so Bactrians which can be found in the North of China and in Mongolia.

Whilst the old story of camels storing water in their humps is untrue, they do store fat which can be broken down into energy and water. It is this characteristic which allows these, the largest members of the camelid family, to travel such long distances without consuming water in the hot deserts of the world. Other adaptations possessed by the camel include broad footpads - preventing them from sinking into the sand, little body fat - allowing heat to be lost more easily, and long eyelashes - which prevent sand being blown into the camel's eyes.
6. Ralph the llama takes you to his next relative, uncle MIMO. Having done much research into the "family tree," MIMO begins to tell you that the camelid family originated from the North American continent. Is there still a wild population of camelids on the continent today?

Answer: No

Whilst many of the early members of the camelids were small (some smaller than housecats), most were similar in size to those found in the world today. It is thought that the camelids first appeared around 45 million years ago.

The camelids were to stay in North America until fairly recently (the actual period is debated - some say they died out during the last ice age (around 10,000 years ago), whereas others claim it was much earlier). They were introduced into Asia, and many migrated to South America. Those camelids which survive today live in South America (llamas, guanacos, vicuņas, and alpacas), Africa (dromedaries), and Asia (both dromedaries and Bactrians).
7. MIMO tells you and Ralph the llama about a bone which was found at a Wal-Mart construction site in 2007. What was significant about this discovery?

Answer: It belonged to an extinct member of the camelid family

The bone was found in Mesa, Arizona, by John Babiarz whilst digging holes for citrus trees in the area surrounding what was to become the site of a new Wal-Mart store in 2007. Babiarz was said to be "quite shocked to see a camel down there," and suggested that "somebody could have buried their pet llama 20 years ago."

It has been estimated that the bone is 8,000 to 10,000 years old and was suspected to belong to the extinct camelid of the genus, Camelops. Further excavation of the area produced teeth, a lower jaw section, a hoof, a humerus, scapula, and vertebrae.

MIMO also mentions some other notable family members, including the genus Protylopus - which is thought to be both the smallest and oldest of all camelids to have ever lived. Also mentioned were the 11 ft tall members of the now extinct Titanotylopus genus.
8. As mentioned earlier in the quiz, many camelids have been domesticated and so can perform specific jobs. Cousin Kyle tells you about how llamas can be used for a special purpose in North Carolina, just off of the Blue Ridge Mountains. What is this special job?

Answer: Golf caddy

These special llamas can be found at Sherwood Forest Golf Course in North Carolina. After purchasing a herd of 12 or so llamas a few years back, the workers at the course trained the llamas to become golf caddies. This decision resulted in an increase in the number of visitors to the course. Regular visitors to the course soon warmed to these charming animals and were able to identify each one's unique character. So much so, that each llama has been named.

As well as the obvious use as pack animals, camels were also used in cavalry regiments of many countries such as Persia and the USA. Their main use was their ability to scare horses - a clear advantage when fighting against enemy cavalry at close range.
9. Still a bit curious about those "wild" members of the camelid family Glendathecat mentioned earlier, you and Ralph decide to go and meet Ralph's wacky aunts, Flopsy and PDAZ, the guanacos. In which South American country are you unlikely to find Flopsy and PDAZ causing mischief?

Answer: Brazil

As well as Peru, Colombia, and Argentina, guanacos can be found wild in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Chile. Along with their close relatives, the vicuņas, the guanacos are the only wild camelids. The guanaco is similar in appearance to the vicuņa. The two can be told apart by their relative sizes (the guanaco is typically larger) as well as the shorter face and longer ears of the vicuņa.

The guanacos live high up in the Andes and so have several adaptations to deal with their environment. The soft wool of the guanaco helps it deal with the low temperatures which may trouble other animals at such altitudes. The warmth and luxurious feel of the wool has also meant that the guanaco is often hunted for its coat. Also, the blood of a guanaco contains around four times the number of red blood cells per unit volume than the average human's blood, making this camelid very well adapted to low oxygen levels. Finally, the speeds which these animals can reach, their methods of warning each other of danger, and the thick skin which surrounds their necks all go towards protecting them from their one natural predator, the mountain lion.
10. Your final visit is to Ralph's Grandparents, Mikejamillon and Qoolgal. They tell Ralph that when he and his cousins (the alpaca, vicuna and guanaco) were younger, they had a special nickname for them - the same nickname many others give to these animals. What was this nickname?

Answer: "Camels of the Clouds"

Cria is also the name given to the young of alpacas, guanacos, and vicuņas. The young of a camel is a calf.

The name "Camel of the Clouds" most likely comes from the similarities of these creatures to the more familiar camel, whilst referring to their Andean habitat.

Another name given to llamas in particular by early travellers was the "Peruvian Sheep".
Source: Author doublemm

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor crisw before going online.
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