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Quiz about Sammy Sosquirrely Meets His Neighbors
Quiz about Sammy Sosquirrely Meets His Neighbors

Sammy Sosquirrely Meets His Neighbors Quiz


Sammy Sosquirrely wants to play, so he's going exploring Illinois today. He wants to know who's living nearby, and play with them - whether girl or guy! So come along with Sammy Sosquirrely, and see if you know who he will go see!

A multiple-choice quiz by beergirllaura. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
357,894
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
666
Last 3 plays: Guest 175 (3/10), bernie73 (5/10), Guest 75 (6/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm exploring my state!
Where I saw a Northern cardinal whose coloring is great!
The male is bright red, with a black face mask,
The female's is brown, there's no need to ask!
In Illinois they overwinter, braving the snow,
But can you tell me - do they mate for life? Do you know?


Question 2 of 10
2. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely and I have seen a wee critter,
A Tamias striatus - and I hope to play with her!
She has stripes on her back, and a furry little tail,
Nuts and seeds fill her cheek's pouches without fail!
Now I'm sure I recognize this creature so small,
If I want her to play, which common name should I call?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, in the forest today,
And a Vulpes vulpes is heading my way!
This red fox is a male, looking for food,
To take back to his vixen and their brood!
The kits have yet to open their eyes,
When they do, what color might be a surprise?
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm exploring my yard,
But telling these birds apart is surprisingly hard!
I'm using my bird guide to help me decide,
If this is a Zenaida macroura trying to hide.
With a call that is plaintive - almost a sad coo,
Is this medium-sized brown bird familiar to you?

Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm not getting near,
The striped skunk ambling around over here.
He is not all that big, about the size of a house cat,
Although all that fur makes him look rather fat!
Yet he is missing something that could cause some concern,
But just what is he missing - did you ever learn?


Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm visiting the pond,
There's a small creature here of which I am fond.
A Chrysemys picta, with a yellow-striped head,
And a colorful bottom - or so it is said!
I have seen him resting on rocks, basking in the sun,
He's a reptile for sure, but do you know which one?


Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm in the woods today,
Where a Colaptes auratus is busily pecking away!
This medium-sized bird has bars on its back,
And while it's mainly brown, those bars are black!
In the woodpecker family this bird is at home,
Can you tell me the common name by which it is known?


Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm exploring today,
I'm looking for someone who might want to play!
A Sciurus carolinensis just might fit the bill,
Running and playing seems to give him a thrill!
He scampers over fences, the ground and the trees,
And bird feeders he seems to raid with great ease.
Now do you know this common little guy?
Do you know which regular name he goes by?
Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I am on a quest,
To find a toad who I think might be the best!
An eastern American toad I am trying to find,
A rather small specimen of the common kind.
But I am going to have to come back later tonight,
The adults are nocturnal, if I am remembering right!


Question 10 of 10
10. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm prowling about,
I just saw a Lasiurus cinereus, there's no doubt!
It was up in a pine tree, looking quite spooky,
It had brownish fur that looked frosted - so kooky!
While moths seem to be its favorite meal,
By what common name do I know this animal?
Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Jun 29 2024 : Guest 175: 3/10
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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm exploring my state! Where I saw a Northern cardinal whose coloring is great! The male is bright red, with a black face mask, The female's is brown, there's no need to ask! In Illinois they overwinter, braving the snow, But can you tell me - do they mate for life? Do you know?

Answer: Yes

A medium-sized songbird, the Northern cardinal is found throughout the eastern half of North America, with extreme ranges into Texas, Belize, Mexico and lower areas of Canada. They are very territorial, and will aggressively defend not only their own young, but also those of other birds.

Their distinctive crests, coloring - males a crimson red and females a brownish-red - and song, makes them some of North America's most recognizable birds. They do mate for life, and have one to four broods each year, but due to juvenile predation, their median lifespan is approximately one year. In addition to being the mascot for a number of sports teams, the Northern cardinal is the state bird of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, North Carolina, Ohio, Virginia and West Virginia. Oddly enough, Missouri's state bird is the Eastern Bluebird - while their Major League Baseball team is named the St. Louis Cardinals.
2. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely and I have seen a wee critter, A Tamias striatus - and I hope to play with her! She has stripes on her back, and a furry little tail, Nuts and seeds fill her cheek's pouches without fail! Now I'm sure I recognize this creature so small, If I want her to play, which common name should I call?

Answer: eastern chipmunk

Eastern chipmunks are solitary creatures, except during their mating seasons. They have two such seasons, one in the spring and one in the summer, and the females may produce two litters, each consisting of three to five babies. Their diet consists of nuts, acorns, seeds, insects, bird eggs, snails and other small foods.

They prefer to live at the edges of woodlands, in open forests, and bushy or rocky areas. The eastern chipmunk has cheek pouches to store and carry food.
3. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, in the forest today, And a Vulpes vulpes is heading my way! This red fox is a male, looking for food, To take back to his vixen and their brood! The kits have yet to open their eyes, When they do, what color might be a surprise?

Answer: blue

Red foxes usually have one litter per year, consisting of four to six kits. It takes 13 - 15 days for the kits' eyes to open. While their eyes begin life as blue, they change to amber at 4-5 weeks.
Red foxes have a wide distribution across the northern hemisphere, and adapt well to human habitation. Their diet usually consists of mice, voles, birds, reptiles, berries, acorns and grasses - but can also include garbage and pet food. On average, in the wild, they live two to four years.
4. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm exploring my yard, But telling these birds apart is surprisingly hard! I'm using my bird guide to help me decide, If this is a Zenaida macroura trying to hide. With a call that is plaintive - almost a sad coo, Is this medium-sized brown bird familiar to you?

Answer: mourning dove

Mourning doves are year-round inhabitants throughout most of the United States (continental) and Mexico. They are usually brown to gray in color, with black and whitish markings. Plump-bodied and long-tailed, their heads tend to seem disproportionately small.

They like to roost on telephone wires, forest-edge trees and urban areas with acceptable perches. They prefer to nest in trees, and upon reproduction will usually have two eggs - which both the female and male will tend to.
5. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm not getting near, The striped skunk ambling around over here. He is not all that big, about the size of a house cat, Although all that fur makes him look rather fat! Yet he is missing something that could cause some concern, But just what is he missing - did you ever learn?

Answer: homing instinct

Striped skunks lack a homing instinct and can easily get lost. They use scent marking to delineate their territory and communicate their presence. They are most active at dusk and dawn, and subsist on a diet which includes squirrels, mice, snails, honeybees, berries and similar foods.

They can be found throughout Illinois, and through most of North America, in a variety of habitats. In some areas, striped skunks are kept as pets, but they are not common pets due to the veterinary care they require. The striped skunk, or Mephitis mephitis, does have natural predators - great horned owls and red-tailed hawks, who are not deterred by the skunk's scent-spraying defense system.
6. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm visiting the pond, There's a small creature here of which I am fond. A Chrysemys picta, with a yellow-striped head, And a colorful bottom - or so it is said! I have seen him resting on rocks, basking in the sun, He's a reptile for sure, but do you know which one?

Answer: painted turtle

The painted turtles found in Illinois are the midland and western subspecies. They are freshwater turtles, with the ability to breathe air and absorb oxygen in water through their skin. Both can grow up to 10 inches in length, with the females usually both longer and heavier than the males.

Their upper shells are olive to black with light markings, and the bottom shells are shaded a dark yellow to bright red with splotchy markings. They are omnivores, and in place of teeth they have a hard beak. Lacking vocal chords, they do not have a call, but they are capable of producing hissing noises. Basking is a regular part of their daily routine, except during their winter hibernation, and while they are often seen basking on logs or rocks, they have been seen doing so in numerous other places - including atop nesting loons! The painted turtle is Illinois' state reptile.
7. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm in the woods today, Where a Colaptes auratus is busily pecking away! This medium-sized bird has bars on its back, And while it's mainly brown, those bars are black! In the woodpecker family this bird is at home, Can you tell me the common name by which it is known?

Answer: Northern flicker

There are two subspecies of Northern flickers in North America - the yellow-shafted flicker and the red-shafted flicker. Members of the woodpecker family, both are medium-sized birds with wingspans of up to 21 inches. Their plumage is mostly brown with black bars and scalloping, and the undersides of their wings and tails are either yellow or red. While they will eat berries, nuts, seeds and other foods, ants make up almost half of their diet.
There is also a gilded flicker - which looks like a cross between the two subspecies - found in southern Arizona and northwestern Mexico.
8. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm exploring today, I'm looking for someone who might want to play! A Sciurus carolinensis just might fit the bill, Running and playing seems to give him a thrill! He scampers over fences, the ground and the trees, And bird feeders he seems to raid with great ease. Now do you know this common little guy? Do you know which regular name he goes by?

Answer: Eastern grey squirrel

The Eastern grey squirrel, or simply grey squirrel, is one of the most common small mammals found throughout the midwestern and eastern portions of North America. A frequent raider of bird feeders, their diet includes acorns, seeds, berries, fungi and insects.

They prefer to build their nests, known as dreys, in large trees, although they will also take advantage of man-made structures such as sheds or houses. Most active during early morning and evening, they are also active throughout the day, making them a familiar sight in yards and parks. Curious and shy, they can be enticed to approach humans with food.

The grey squirrel is not always grey, but frequently brown or even black.
9. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I am on a quest, To find a toad who I think might be the best! An eastern American toad I am trying to find, A rather small specimen of the common kind. But I am going to have to come back later tonight, The adults are nocturnal, if I am remembering right!

Answer: True

American toads are found throughout a large part of North America - from Canada south to Alabama, and from Maine west to Oklahoma. There are three subspecies - the eastern American toad, the dwarf American toad and the Hudson Bay toad. They are freshwater amphibians, and commonly found near ponds, and if there is water nearby, also in gardens and farmlands.

They hibernate during the winter, and breed during the late spring or early summer months. Adults are mainly nocturnal, and usually solitary except during the breeding season.
10. I'm Sammy Sosquirrely, and I'm prowling about, I just saw a Lasiurus cinereus, there's no doubt! It was up in a pine tree, looking quite spooky, It had brownish fur that looked frosted - so kooky! While moths seem to be its favorite meal, By what common name do I know this animal?

Answer: hoary bat

Hoary bats have a wingspan of almost 16 inches, and a body length of about 5.5 inches. They are the most widespread of American bats, and even have a presence in Hawaii - but not in Alaska. They prefer to live in woodlands, usually alone, and hunt at night - again, usually alone. Unlike most bats, they give birth to two pups on a fairly regular basis, and have recorded births of up to four pups.

While moths are their preferred food, their diet also includes beetles, wasps, termites, grasshoppers, dragonflies and flies.
Source: Author beergirllaura

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Tizzabelle before going online.
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