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Quiz about And a Woof Woof There
Quiz about And a Woof Woof There

And a Woof! Woof! There Trivia Quiz


A number of dogs who featured in movies over the years were also found in other media forms. How many of these make you want to woof nostalgically?

A multiple-choice quiz by looney_tunes. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
looney_tunes
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
334,495
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
2170
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: TriviaFan22 (10/10), granpa46 (7/10), rabbit1964 (9/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. One of the first cinematic canine superstars was a German Shepherd rescued in France during World War I by an American serviceman named Lee Duncan, who took him home after the war. His performance of tricks in a dog show led to a movie contract, and a series of silent films (and a few sound movies) in which he often portrayed a wolf or wolf-cross. Future incarnations included radio and television shows, starring either the original dog or one of his descendants, through the 1950s. Who was this 'Wonder Dog'? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. In 1939 a Cairn terrier named Terry stole our hearts in a role as companion to a girl, a scarecrow, a lion and a tin man on a perilous journey. What was the name of Dorothy's dog in "The Wizard of Oz" - book, musical and movie? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote a novel involving a supposedly supernatural dog that was supposed to have killed a baronet in Devon. Sherlock Holmes revealed the true nature of the beast and identified the actual murderer. What was the name of the novel and of the 1939 movie based on it? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. In 1903 Jack London wrote a story about Buck, a pet dog who is sold to be a sled dog in the Yukon, and eventually abandons human contacts to join a pack of wolves. The story formed the basis of a 1935 Clark Gable film which shifted the emphasis from the dog to the human relationships, as well a Charlton Heston film in 1972. Which Jack London novel was this? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. In Edinburgh you can see a statue erected in memory of a Skye terrier who was reported to have guarded his master's grave from 1858 until his own death in 1872. Eleanor Atkinson wrote a 1912 novel inspired by him, and he has been the eponymous subject of at least two films. Do you remember the name of this much-loved dog? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Dodie Smith wrote a story in 1956 about Pongo's struggle to rescue his 15 spotted puppies, along with 82 others who had been captured by Cruella de Vil. What was the name of Walt Disney's 1961 animated feature based on this book? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. In 1963 Walt Disney produced "The Incredible Journey", a realistic portrayal of the adventures encountered by two dogs and a cat as they travel several hundred miles across Canada to return home. What are the pets' breeds? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. In 1974 Higgins, a dog rescued from an animal shelter, emerged from retirement (after an illustrious television career) when he played the title role in a film about a lovable stray who falls in love with a cute, fluffy female stray. The two of them help rescue two kidnapped children in this film, the first of a series starring its eponymous hero. What is the name of this film? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. The star of the 1995 film "Babe" is a pig, but there are some important dogs in the movie. What breed are Fly and Rex, who help train Babe to herd sheep? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Of course you remember Nana, who took care of the Darling children in J M Barrie's classic play "Peter Pan; or, the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up", as well as in many subsequent novel, stage, film and television adaptations. The original character was based on Barrie's own pet, Luath. What breed of dog was Nana? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. One of the first cinematic canine superstars was a German Shepherd rescued in France during World War I by an American serviceman named Lee Duncan, who took him home after the war. His performance of tricks in a dog show led to a movie contract, and a series of silent films (and a few sound movies) in which he often portrayed a wolf or wolf-cross. Future incarnations included radio and television shows, starring either the original dog or one of his descendants, through the 1950s. Who was this 'Wonder Dog'?

Answer: Rin Tin Tin

Rin Tin Tin's first film was "The Man From Hell's River" (1922), when he stood in for an uncooperative wolf. His first starring role was in "Where the North Begins" (1923), the first of many Warner Brothers films. On April 15, 1930 "The Wonder Dog" premiered on radio, featuring the voice of the original Rin Tin Tin until his death, when he was replaced by his son Rin Tin Tin, Jr. Rin Tin Tin III and Rin Tin Tin IV continued the family tradition, with the latter being the primary star of the television series "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954-1959).

In this series, Rin Tin Tin was the companion of a boy named Rusty who was growing up in a cavalry post called Fort Apache at some indeterminate time when the West was wild and being settled.
2. In 1939 a Cairn terrier named Terry stole our hearts in a role as companion to a girl, a scarecrow, a lion and a tin man on a perilous journey. What was the name of Dorothy's dog in "The Wizard of Oz" - book, musical and movie?

Answer: Toto

As the owner of a Cairn terrier, I cannot help but feel that Terry often steals the scene from her human companions. She was lucky to get the part - there was some uncertainty as to what breed of dog Toto was in the original book, as it was never stated and had to be deduced from a description and the illustrations. Opinion is divided as to whether "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" (1900) showed a Cairn terrier or a Yorkshire terrier, which was very popular at that time.

Some later books in the series showed him as a Boston terrier, a much larger dog (up to 44lbs, or 20 kg) with a smooth coat. Most movie, stage play and musical adaptations of the novel have chosen to use a smaller dog for the part of Toto!
3. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote a novel involving a supposedly supernatural dog that was supposed to have killed a baronet in Devon. Sherlock Holmes revealed the true nature of the beast and identified the actual murderer. What was the name of the novel and of the 1939 movie based on it?

Answer: The Hound of the Baskervilles

Without giving away the plot of this classic, I can let you know that the hellhound was actually a real dog made to look scary and remind those who saw it of a local legend involving a family curse, distracting attention from a much more mundane motive for murder.

In the book (originally published in serial form between 1901 and 1902) this was accomplished by painting its head with phosphorescent paint; in the 1939 movie it wore a mask. Conan Doyle's classic novel has had over 20 film versions, but this one starring Basil Rathbone is usually considered one of the best, even if it is one of the least faithful to the original.
4. In 1903 Jack London wrote a story about Buck, a pet dog who is sold to be a sled dog in the Yukon, and eventually abandons human contacts to join a pack of wolves. The story formed the basis of a 1935 Clark Gable film which shifted the emphasis from the dog to the human relationships, as well a Charlton Heston film in 1972. Which Jack London novel was this?

Answer: The Call of the Wild

"The Call of the Wild" explores the ways in which Buck's environment affects his ability to resist his deep animal instincts. Kidnapped from a comfortable life as a California pet and sold to be used as a sled dog, he struggles with the other dogs in the pack for leadership, undergoes maltreatment from an ignorant owner, nearly dying in the process. After recovering, he accepts that his old life with humans is a thing of the past, and answers the call of the wild by joining a wolf pack. Both movie versions mentioned here focus on the final part of the story, as Buck recovers under the care of a prospector who has rescued him, and struggles to decide where he belongs.

The original Buck was a Saint Bernard cross, but the movie and television versions have been of varied breeds, including St Bernards and German Shepherds.
5. In Edinburgh you can see a statue erected in memory of a Skye terrier who was reported to have guarded his master's grave from 1858 until his own death in 1872. Eleanor Atkinson wrote a 1912 novel inspired by him, and he has been the eponymous subject of at least two films. Do you remember the name of this much-loved dog?

Answer: Greyfriars Bobby

Bobby belonged to night watchman John Gray, who dies of tuberculosis when the dog was two years old. The dog maintained a graveside vigil (although some say that he left for food, and may even have spent winter nights in nearby houses) for fourteen years in Greyfriars Kirkyard, and became a minor celebrity. He was buried just outside the gates, and there is a statue to his memory nearby, as well as a much-decorated headstone at the actual grave.

Eleanor Atkinson changed many details, including turning John Gray into an agricultural laborer and romanticizing the dog's situation. This novel was the basis of the 1949 film "Challenge to Lassie", which adapted the tale for the established collie star. In 1961 Walt Disney released "Greyfriars Bobby", again based on Atkinson's novel, but this time starring a Skye terrier. Another movie, released in 2005/2006, reverted to a plot closer to the actual story, but using a West Highland white terrier ('Westie') in the title role.
6. Dodie Smith wrote a story in 1956 about Pongo's struggle to rescue his 15 spotted puppies, along with 82 others who had been captured by Cruella de Vil. What was the name of Walt Disney's 1961 animated feature based on this book?

Answer: One Hundred and One Dalmatians

"One Hundred and One Dalmatians" (often abbreviated to "101 Dalmatians") changed the original storyline to make Perdita and Pongo the parents of the puppies (where Perdita had been a friend of Pongo and Missis in the book who was reunited with a lost love at the end of the story), and add some human romance as well. The puppy numbers had to be adjusted up by two to keep the Dalmatian total at 101.

Cruela's intention (in the movie) to turn the dogs into fur coats is clearly the inspiration for the episode of the television show "The Simpsons" in which Monty Burns sings the song "See My Vest".

"Twilight Barking" was the way dogs communicated with each other across large distances; "Hell Hall" was the name of Cruella de Vil's home; "The Great Dog Robbery" was the subtitle of the original book.
7. In 1963 Walt Disney produced "The Incredible Journey", a realistic portrayal of the adventures encountered by two dogs and a cat as they travel several hundred miles across Canada to return home. What are the pets' breeds?

Answer: Labrador retriever, bull terrier, Siamese cat

The film was considered realistic in that Luath (the young Labrader retriever), Bodger (the older bull terrier) and Tao (the Siamese cat) do not speak, or behave in unnatural ways, aside from showing amazing inventiveness and resilience as they overcome the hurdles placed in their way.

A later version in 1993 used human voices to convey the thoughts of the animals during their journey. The three animals are left with a pet sitter while their family is away on a lengthy overseas trip, but he in turn leaves them to be tended by a daily housekeeper while he is away on a hunting trip. Lonely, the animals decide to head for home, looking for their original family, and take out on their incredibly difficult journey.
8. In 1974 Higgins, a dog rescued from an animal shelter, emerged from retirement (after an illustrious television career) when he played the title role in a film about a lovable stray who falls in love with a cute, fluffy female stray. The two of them help rescue two kidnapped children in this film, the first of a series starring its eponymous hero. What is the name of this film?

Answer: Benji

Higgins, a scruffy-looking black and tan dog of indeterminate terrier-ish breeding, appeared on many episodes of the television series "Petticoat Junction" between 1964 and 1970, playing "Dog", and won a Patsy award in 1967. He came out of retirement to star in "Benji", his greatest film success.

His daughter, Benjean, played Benji in a number of the sequels, both on the silver screen and in the 1983 television series "Benji, Zax and the Alien Prince".
9. The star of the 1995 film "Babe" is a pig, but there are some important dogs in the movie. What breed are Fly and Rex, who help train Babe to herd sheep?

Answer: Border Collies

Fly trains the piglet Babe along with her own Border Collie puppies, but Babe has his own ideas about how to handle sheep - he prefers to ask them politely, as advised by the elderly ewe Maa, instead of nipping and staring them into obedience. The movie adds the character of Rex, who has issues with pigs herding sheep, to the cast of the original 1983 book titled "The Sheep-Pig" ("Babe the Gallant Pig" in the U.S.). "Babe" uses a combination of human actors, real animals, and animatronic characters.
10. Of course you remember Nana, who took care of the Darling children in J M Barrie's classic play "Peter Pan; or, the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up", as well as in many subsequent novel, stage, film and television adaptations. The original character was based on Barrie's own pet, Luath. What breed of dog was Nana?

Answer: Newfoundland

The original Nana was a Newfoundland, as was Luath. The costume for the original production in 1904 has a two-tone coat patterned after the coloring of Barrie's pet. This has led to some confusion as to the dog's breed, since Newfoundlands more commonly have a solid coat color. Nana has been described (and portrayed) as a St. Bernard, an Old English sheepdog, and a Pyrenean Mountain dog, among others, but never as one of the small dogs listed as incorrect options!

On stage, Nana was portrayed by a boy or small man (Arthur Lupino originated the role on stage, George Ali played Nana in the 1924 silent film adaptation). According to Barrie's stage directions, the actor should be on all fours, and "must never be on two legs except on those rare occasions when an ordinary nurse would be on four." Disney's animated version in 1953 took some liberties with this restriction.
Source: Author looney_tunes

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