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Quiz about Historic Realms The Tokugawa Shogunate
Quiz about Historic Realms The Tokugawa Shogunate

Historic Realms: The Tokugawa Shogunate Quiz


A little rusty on your history? Come learn a little about the world's historic realms in this photo quiz series. Here we will talk about the Tokugawa Shogunate. (If you would like to have a better view of the images/maps, please click on them to enlarge!

A photo quiz by trident. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
trident
Time
6 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
369,955
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
483
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 98 (7/10), Guest 168 (2/10), Guest 203 (3/10).
photo quiz
1. The Tokugawa clan apparently took its name from the village of Tokugawa in the Kozuke province in the thirteenth century, though they didn't rule the shogunate until 1600. Here we see their "mon", or family crest, which is a familiar sight in Japan symbolizing shogunate power. What is the pattern of the mon called? Hint

gold cloverleaf
triple hollyhock
receding spades
angry mushrooms

photo quiz
2. Pictured is a battle between two daimyo, or clan leaders, in 1561. Between the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries, Japan's main leader was an emperor, but the position was mostly ceremonial. The shogunate was the main source of power keeping the daimyo, or minor leaders, together. However, many daimyo began to challenge the shogun. What was this war-torn time known as? Hint

Showa Period
Kenmu Restoration
Sengoku Period
Northern Wei

photo quiz
3. The daimyo were at war with each other, and in some cases at war with the shogunate itself. Before the Tokogawa took power, the many clans needed to be reunited under one rule. A common saying at the time referring to Japan's unification was "____________ pounds the national cake, Toyotomi Hideyoshi kneads it, and Tokugawa Iesayu sits down and eats it." Who was the powerful leader who united many of the clans of Japan, allowing for his ally, the Tokogawa clan, to rule? Hint

Masaharu Morimoto
Hiroyuki Sakai
Oda Nobunaga
Rokusaburo Michiba

photo quiz
4. This folding screen depicts many daimyo pledging allegiance to the Tokugawa shogunate at their ruling castle. Previously, the ruling authority and power was based in Kyoto, but the Tokugawa moved the center of the shogunate's power to a small fishing village, which after a name change, is the current Japanese capital city. Where was the new center of power? Hint

Edo
Hiroshima
Sapporo
Misawa

photo quiz
5. Social stratification became less pronounced during the Tokugawa Shogunate and there was more opportunity to advance from one's low class in society to a higher class.

True
False

photo quiz
6. Pictured is a Japanese red-seal ship, which was an armed merchant ship based upon the design of European galleons. They traveled the seas of Asia on merchant trips, as well as defending against piracy. The first European trade ship arrived from Portugal and the Europeans began trading with these red-seal ships within their Asian colonies. Most often associated with the firearms and Christianity they imported into the country, what were the European traders called? Hint

Samurai
Bakufu
Nanban
Ninja

photo quiz
7. The Tokugawa Shogunate utilized the "metsuke" (shown here in Japanese) to help keep the peace in their lands. These well-trained officials were primarily responsible for which of the following? Hint

war tactics and the raising of armies
assassination and structural sabotage
espionage and oversight of administration
religious worship and missionary work

photo quiz
8. The third Tokugawa shogun, Iemitsu, began to meddle significantly in the affairs of the daimyo, shuffling them around, splitting territories, and removing some altogether. As a result, many of the samurai who served under the former daimyo often became leaderless and jobless. As seen in this image, these wandering samurai were angered by this meddling and began the Keain Uprising to push out the shogunate. What were they called? Hint

Sashimi
Yakuza
Ronin
Ashigaru

photo quiz
9. For nearly 200 years, the Tokugawa shogunate instituted the policy of "sakoku" in which foreigners were not allowed to enter the country under penalty of death. There were small exceptions, but the shogunate wished to stem the influence of the Europeans and dash any colonial aspirations. What event shown in the illustration forcibly ended this policy of "sakoku" in 1853? Hint

Dutch colonial forces establishing themselves on the Japanese mainland
The Chinese invasion of Japanese trade ports
The arrival of an American fleet under Commodore Perry
Portuguese hard diplomacy with the threat of naval blockade

photo quiz
10. Discontent over shogunate weakness and the decision to relent to foreign powers led to the Satsuma clan and its allies to begin a campaign on behalf of the emperor to bring him back to power. This photograph shows the generals plotting to overthrow the shogunate. Since the Tokugawa began their rule, they had made the role of emperor a powerless one. However, this uprising succeeded in overthrowing the last shogun, Tokugawa Yoshinobu, who the generals feared as being a strong leader. What was the name of this Japanese civil war? Hint

Russo-Japanese War
Boshin War
Boxer Rebellion
Sino-Japanese War


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The Tokugawa clan apparently took its name from the village of Tokugawa in the Kozuke province in the thirteenth century, though they didn't rule the shogunate until 1600. Here we see their "mon", or family crest, which is a familiar sight in Japan symbolizing shogunate power. What is the pattern of the mon called?

Answer: triple hollyhock

The triple hollyhock is said to be a representation of Yatagarasu, a three-legged crow common to many East Asian mythologies. The Tokugawa family line has some irregularities; the shoguns attempted to legitimize their dynastic rule as relatives of the Matsudaira clan.

Many historians believe that this effort was falsified, and that the Tokugawa clan came from another ancient clan. Yet, in the end, Tokugawa shoguns ruled Japan for over 200 years, whether or not their ancient lineage didn't quite check out.
2. Pictured is a battle between two daimyo, or clan leaders, in 1561. Between the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries, Japan's main leader was an emperor, but the position was mostly ceremonial. The shogunate was the main source of power keeping the daimyo, or minor leaders, together. However, many daimyo began to challenge the shogun. What was this war-torn time known as?

Answer: Sengoku Period

The Sengoku period took place under the Ashikaga shogunate, and was marked with disloyalty to the shogun and several warring factions. Also during this time, lesser (but capable) lords and soldiers made their way into power, a process known as "Gekokuj˘", or "the low overcomes the high".

The daimyo began infighting, and older, long-established families, such as the Takeda and Imagawa clans, began to consolidate power. The shogunate was very weak during this period, and the clans were quick to take advantage of an ineffective central power.

The Showa Period takes place during World War II, with Emperor Hirohito being the Showa ruler.
3. The daimyo were at war with each other, and in some cases at war with the shogunate itself. Before the Tokogawa took power, the many clans needed to be reunited under one rule. A common saying at the time referring to Japan's unification was "____________ pounds the national cake, Toyotomi Hideyoshi kneads it, and Tokugawa Iesayu sits down and eats it." Who was the powerful leader who united many of the clans of Japan, allowing for his ally, the Tokogawa clan, to rule?

Answer: Oda Nobunaga

Oda Nobunaga was a very shrewd political and military leader, and no wonder, since his calculations were developed early on with the quick death of his father and the subsequent maneuvers he had to perform in order to secure his own claim as daimyo of the Oda clan. After he had unified his own Owari province, he moved to consolidate his power and influence over the region, defeating an army of over 20,000 Imagawa troops with his mere 3,000 men.

Soon after, Nobunaga began to play the many daimyo off one another and conquering the many lands around Kyoto. He brought together many daimyo under his rule and ended the Ashikaga shogunate. After his death (by the betrayal of one of his generals), Toyotomi, a former sandal bearer and close ally of Nobunaga, ruled briefly. Later, Tokugawa Iesayu would take over and establish the Tokugawa shogunate with a large swath of the lands Nobunaga had consolidated previously.

The three incorrect answers are all chefs from the Japanese television program "Iron Chef".
4. This folding screen depicts many daimyo pledging allegiance to the Tokugawa shogunate at their ruling castle. Previously, the ruling authority and power was based in Kyoto, but the Tokugawa moved the center of the shogunate's power to a small fishing village, which after a name change, is the current Japanese capital city. Where was the new center of power?

Answer: Edo

Kyoto was the city where the old shoguns had kept power, but too many influential daimyo had a strangle-hold on the lands around the city. To negate the effects of these influential daimyo, Tokugawa Iesayu moved the center of power closer to his lands to Edo, which is now known as Tokyo.

This new capital city was relatively small, but would grow and continue to prosper with the continuation of the Tokugawa Shogunate, ultimately becoming increasingly urban. The name of the city was changed to Tokyo when the shogunate ended.
5. Social stratification became less pronounced during the Tokugawa Shogunate and there was more opportunity to advance from one's low class in society to a higher class.

Answer: False

Social mobility was actually more pronounced in the Sengoku period before the Tokugawa Shogunate took power. As illustrated by the concept of "Gekokuj˘", low lords and even soldiers could end up as powerful daimyo.

It was ironic that it was Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who had gained so much power from lowly sandal bearer to ruler of Oda Nobunaga's lands, that instituted many of the edicts that would ban such social mobility. Strict class hierarchies were established and expected to be followed once the Tokugawa clan created their shogunate. Because the instability of the previous system, this was seen as necessary for the shogunate to operate definitively.
6. Pictured is a Japanese red-seal ship, which was an armed merchant ship based upon the design of European galleons. They traveled the seas of Asia on merchant trips, as well as defending against piracy. The first European trade ship arrived from Portugal and the Europeans began trading with these red-seal ships within their Asian colonies. Most often associated with the firearms and Christianity they imported into the country, what were the European traders called?

Answer: Nanban

The samurai and ninja were instruments of the shogun (who was called the "Bakufu" in Japanese). However, it was the "Nanban" that were completely foreign to the Japanese. The word traditionally meant "southern barbarian", or those from Southeast Asia. However, since there was no word for Europeans, this catchall was given to them as well.

The Portuguese were the first to land in Japan as early as 1543, and their presence grew before the Tokugawa came to power. The Nanban introduced the arquebus, a type of firearm, to the Japanese. Christianity also spread to Japan during this time as missionaries began to arrive. At first, the religion was accepted, especially since the Japanese (as Shintos) were more wary of Buddhism. However, during Tokugawa rule, it became apparent that Christianity had the potential to become a destabilizing force and many of its practices were outlawed.
7. The Tokugawa Shogunate utilized the "metsuke" (shown here in Japanese) to help keep the peace in their lands. These well-trained officials were primarily responsible for which of the following?

Answer: espionage and oversight of administration

The metsuke (which loosely means "focusing of the eyes") were officials who reported on the activities of lesser officials. The activities of the daimyo and higher officials were dealt with by the "˘metsuke". The metsuke engaged in covert espionage to uncover any discontent in the shogunate, but were also involved in the day-to-day affairs of administration. Any signs of the misuse of funds or of missing taxes was reported by the metsuke.

While not samurai or ninja, these officials were often just as feared. Sometimes the metsuke resorted to torture in order to obtain the information they wanted.
8. The third Tokugawa shogun, Iemitsu, began to meddle significantly in the affairs of the daimyo, shuffling them around, splitting territories, and removing some altogether. As a result, many of the samurai who served under the former daimyo often became leaderless and jobless. As seen in this image, these wandering samurai were angered by this meddling and began the Keain Uprising to push out the shogunate. What were they called?

Answer: Ronin

The ronin were often considered criminals, and many did eventually begin to work for criminal enterprises. However, it was mostly due to the shogunate's disregard for daimyo sovereignty and strict social structure that these ronin were forced to find less-than-desirable work. Some were prideful and refused to work for other daimyo, even though their disgraced lords were no longer in power.

In 1651, the Keain Uprising was formulated and many of these well-trained former samurai planned to take Edo. Their original plan was to begin an enormous city-wide fire to distract the shogun's forces, and then attack Edo Castle. However, the plan failed after it leaked to the shogun's spies and the ronin were slaughtered.
9. For nearly 200 years, the Tokugawa shogunate instituted the policy of "sakoku" in which foreigners were not allowed to enter the country under penalty of death. There were small exceptions, but the shogunate wished to stem the influence of the Europeans and dash any colonial aspirations. What event shown in the illustration forcibly ended this policy of "sakoku" in 1853?

Answer: The arrival of an American fleet under Commodore Perry

Japan's isolation could be considered a reasonable action considering what the shogunate had seen in the colonization of the rest of Asia. The isolation resulted in the continued persecution of Buddhists and Christians, as well as anyone deemed too foreign. The shogunate tried to stamp out all foreign influence, though there were exceptions, especially concerning trade.

However, Commodore Matthew Perry brought four technologically-superior warships to Japan in 1853, and demonstrated their capabilities, demanding the Japanese open their ports. The Japanese called the ships the "kurofune" or "The Black Ships". About a year later, Commodore Perry signed the Kanagawa Treaty with the Tokugawa shogunate and the nation was open to foreigners once again.
10. Discontent over shogunate weakness and the decision to relent to foreign powers led to the Satsuma clan and its allies to begin a campaign on behalf of the emperor to bring him back to power. This photograph shows the generals plotting to overthrow the shogunate. Since the Tokugawa began their rule, they had made the role of emperor a powerless one. However, this uprising succeeded in overthrowing the last shogun, Tokugawa Yoshinobu, who the generals feared as being a strong leader. What was the name of this Japanese civil war?

Answer: Boshin War

The Satsuma clan was ready to pounce against the Tokugawa, but the rise of Tokugawa Yoshinobu and his apparent strength as a leader scared the clan into action and they began their rebellion. This period was marked drastically by the modernization of Japan's military, and even though the Emperor's forces fought for more independence from foreign powers, they utilized foreign intervention from the British to help them win the war.

Tokugawa Yoshinobu's forces were defeated outside of Kyoto, and once he realized that it was the Emperor who was raising this army, he desired an end to the hostilities. He surrendered himself to the Imperial army and resigned from the position of shogun. With the last Tokugawa shogun out of power, the Meiji emperor became the de facto leader of the Japan, ending rule by shogunate in Japan.
Source: Author trident

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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