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Quiz about Historic Realms The Mughal Empire
Quiz about Historic Realms The Mughal Empire

Historic Realms: The Mughal Empire Quiz


A little rusty on your history? Come learn a little about the world's historic realms in this photo quiz series. Here we have the Mughal Empire. (If you would like to have a better view of the images/maps, please click on them to enlarge!)

A photo quiz by trident. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
trident
Time
5 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
372,641
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
972
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: PurpleComet (8/10), Guest 203 (0/10), Guest 107 (6/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. This representation of the Mughal "Alam", or royal standard, contains a lion and rising sun on a field of green. The Mughal Empire took much of its cultural influence from the Timurid Empire, which had been based in present-day Iran. As such, the lion was a common symbol for what cultural group that came to rule over India during the Mughal Empire? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Pictured in the center is Babur, the first Mughal emperor. Considering his family background, he had grand ambitions as he ruled from his small kingdom in Farghana (present-day Uzbekistan). On his father's side, he saw the rise and fall of the Timurid Empire. On his mother's side was the Mongolian Horde. Which two giants of history did Babur find in his familial line? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. The son of Babur was overthrown by another ruler named Sher Shah Suri (also known as Sher Khan!) who took control of the Mughal lands. He instituted many reforms, including standardizing silver coins to 178 grains, which in effect became what currency of the Mughals? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. The third Mughal emperor, Akbar, is often considered the greatest Mughal emperor. Not only did he institute grand social reforms, he was able to expand his empire's borders by three times their original size. This image shows soldiers under the command of Akbar during his reign. Along with the Ottoman and Safavid Empires, to what group did the Mughal Empire belong due to the nature of their military successes? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The Mughal Empire under Akbar (which was Sunni) grew increasingly intolerant of other religions, including Hinduism, Shia Islam, and Christianity.


Question 6 of 10
6. The twentieth wife of Emperor Jahangir, she was known to hunt tigers and sit atop war elephants during battle. She often ruled the Mughal Empire while her alcoholic and opium-addicted husband was occupied. Who was she? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. The fifth Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan, is perhaps most famous for the mausoleum he built for his wife. Yet the Taj Mahal wasn't the only famous landmark he built during his reign. He oversaw the construction of what Delhi landmark, which became the residence of the Mughal emperors? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Building on the conquests of his predecessors, the very shrewd sixth Mughal emperor, Aurangzeb, ruled the Mughal Empire at its largest extent, shown here. One of his last conquests was at Golcanda where he captured the Kollur Mine. The mine was the original home of the Koh-i-Noor, a relic that had been controlled by the Mughals since Babur had first captured it. What was the prize of the Kollur Mine? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. In the eighteenth century, the Mughal Empire saw many ineffectual rulers, and due to the fact that the Mughals didn't practice primogeniture, sons of the previous emperors would often war with each other, weakening the empire as a whole. What group pictured here sought to become kingmaker, leveling their power at the throne and even committing regicide? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Here is Bahadur Shah II, the 17th and last Mughal emperor, who ruled only a small, shattered fragment of the mighty empire that had previously stood. Scared of French ambitions in India, what European power propped up the last few Mughal emperors before finally deposing Bahadur Shah II in 1857 and ending the Mughal Empire? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Jun 06 2024 : PurpleComet: 8/10
May 28 2024 : Guest 203: 0/10
May 22 2024 : Guest 107: 6/10
May 20 2024 : Guest 3: 5/10
May 17 2024 : Mrinmoy2023: 6/10
May 10 2024 : Kunalsharm4: 2/10
May 08 2024 : Guest 65: 8/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This representation of the Mughal "Alam", or royal standard, contains a lion and rising sun on a field of green. The Mughal Empire took much of its cultural influence from the Timurid Empire, which had been based in present-day Iran. As such, the lion was a common symbol for what cultural group that came to rule over India during the Mughal Empire?

Answer: Persianate

The Mughal Empire was indeed culturally Persianate, meaning that the rulers of the empire were highly influenced by Persian culture. The empire ruled with a strong centralized government enhanced by inclusive policies. Though the ruling class was minority Islam in a Hindu majority nation, they allowed Hindu subjects to join and progress in the governmental system. Generally, the Mughals tolerated diversity in culture and religion, as it became necessary to rule such a large area effectively.
2. Pictured in the center is Babur, the first Mughal emperor. Considering his family background, he had grand ambitions as he ruled from his small kingdom in Farghana (present-day Uzbekistan). On his father's side, he saw the rise and fall of the Timurid Empire. On his mother's side was the Mongolian Horde. Which two giants of history did Babur find in his familial line?

Answer: Tamerlane and Genghis Khan

Babur is a ruler of some legend, considering his impressive family background and that his empire was built from almost nothing. With a well-trained army and a bit of luck, Babur's forces spread to northern India and began to chip away at the many smaller empires within his sphere. By successfully defending off the Rajputs, Babur was able to solidify his new empire.
3. The son of Babur was overthrown by another ruler named Sher Shah Suri (also known as Sher Khan!) who took control of the Mughal lands. He instituted many reforms, including standardizing silver coins to 178 grains, which in effect became what currency of the Mughals?

Answer: rupee

Though the Suri dynasty only lasted seventeen years, they instituted many administrative reforms, with their most lasting contribution being the standardization of silver coins, which Sher Suri called the "rupiya". After Babur's son retook his throne, the currency was largely retained, though altered slightly from time to time throughout the empire's existence.
4. The third Mughal emperor, Akbar, is often considered the greatest Mughal emperor. Not only did he institute grand social reforms, he was able to expand his empire's borders by three times their original size. This image shows soldiers under the command of Akbar during his reign. Along with the Ottoman and Safavid Empires, to what group did the Mughal Empire belong due to the nature of their military successes?

Answer: the "gunpowder" empires

A "gunpowder empire" is one that had grand military success due the monopolization of gunpowder weapons in its battles. While many European kingdoms had gunpowder, they could not be considered gunpowder empires because their enemies also had gunpowder at their disposal.

The same could not be said of the Mughal Empire's enemies, who fell in short order. Akbar's acquisition of firearms from the Ottomans and Europeans helped him conquer and expand his empire with a threat that no other force could counter.
5. The Mughal Empire under Akbar (which was Sunni) grew increasingly intolerant of other religions, including Hinduism, Shia Islam, and Christianity.

Answer: False

As he needed to rule a large empire with different religious traditions, Akbar instituted reforms that began to gradually accept different religions. The Hindus were included in their own rule, and were allowed to climb the political ladder. Shia Muslims were persecuted at first, but then Akbar began to increasingly tolerate them, declaring a prohibition on sectarian war between Sunni and Shia groups. With the arrival of the colonizing Portuguese, Akbar became familiar with Christianity and allowed it to be introduced to the Mughal people.
6. The twentieth wife of Emperor Jahangir, she was known to hunt tigers and sit atop war elephants during battle. She often ruled the Mughal Empire while her alcoholic and opium-addicted husband was occupied. Who was she?

Answer: Nur Jahan

Nur Jahan was an impressive woman during her time. She was extraordinarily influential during Jahangir's reign, often leading his battles and conducting his diplomacy. Of the many wives that Jahangir took, she was easily his favorite, and he would take her on his hunting excursions. Nur Jahan was so influential that the future emperor, Shah Jahan, needed to raise forces against her after his father died.
7. The fifth Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan, is perhaps most famous for the mausoleum he built for his wife. Yet the Taj Mahal wasn't the only famous landmark he built during his reign. He oversaw the construction of what Delhi landmark, which became the residence of the Mughal emperors?

Answer: The Red Fort

The Red Fort is perhaps the second most iconic Indian building behind the Taj Mahal. Impressively, both were built by the same emperor, whose reign was certainly the golden age of Mughal architecture. The Red Fort is named because it is built from red sandstone. Though it could technically serve as a fort, it is more accurately a palace or imperial residence.
8. Building on the conquests of his predecessors, the very shrewd sixth Mughal emperor, Aurangzeb, ruled the Mughal Empire at its largest extent, shown here. One of his last conquests was at Golcanda where he captured the Kollur Mine. The mine was the original home of the Koh-i-Noor, a relic that had been controlled by the Mughals since Babur had first captured it. What was the prize of the Kollur Mine?

Answer: diamonds

The Kollur Mine has produced some of the most famous diamonds in the world such as the Hope diamond and the Koh-i-Noor, once the largest diamond in the world before it was poorly cut by an inexperienced Venetian jeweler who was visiting India.

Aurangzeb was able to claim the diamond mines, which were defended to the last man. It was a worthy prize, and one celebrated by the emperor.
9. In the eighteenth century, the Mughal Empire saw many ineffectual rulers, and due to the fact that the Mughals didn't practice primogeniture, sons of the previous emperors would often war with each other, weakening the empire as a whole. What group pictured here sought to become kingmaker, leveling their power at the throne and even committing regicide?

Answer: Sayyid Brothers

Two influential generals, the Sayyid Brothers, took it upon themselves to set the standards for ruling for the Mughal emperors. After Aurangzeb, there was rampant instability, and the Sayyid Brothers (who belonged to the old aristocracy) were seen as a stabilizing force, so were kept around.

They were later murdered by forces jealous that the brothers had consolidated power for the aristocracy.
10. Here is Bahadur Shah II, the 17th and last Mughal emperor, who ruled only a small, shattered fragment of the mighty empire that had previously stood. Scared of French ambitions in India, what European power propped up the last few Mughal emperors before finally deposing Bahadur Shah II in 1857 and ending the Mughal Empire?

Answer: British Empire

Because the French were making gains in India and might have been able to install the Mughal emperor as their own puppet, the British quickly took it upon themselves to defeat the Mughals first. For three emperors, the British allowed the Mughals to keep their holdings until the Indian Rebellion of 1857 briefly saw some Indian rebels look to the Mughal emperor as a unifying force. Though Bahadur Shah II didn't seem interested in becoming this figure, the British removed him from power anyway. The British Raj was now the most powerful force in India.
Source: Author trident

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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  2. Historic Realms: The Electorate of Saxony Average
  3. Historic Realms: The Mughal Empire Average
  4. Historic Realms: The Duchy of Brabant Average
  5. Historic Realms: The Duchy of Milan Average
  6. Historic Realms: The Tokugawa Shogunate Average
  7. Historic Realms: The Mamluk Sultanate Average
  8. Historic Realms: The Crown of Castile Average

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